#1
Fellow UG-er's, I've been playing for a while now but only recently have I begun to write my own material with any real effort. I have never had any formal lessons and I only know the basics of music theory, and this has caused me to encounter a problem with a song I am working on.

Before I get into the specifics, it's important to consider that I am writing for two guitars and that both play in CGCFAD tuning. That said:

I'm trying to find a chord to compliment each of these:

D: --
A: 3
F: 2
C: --
G: --
C: --


D: --
A: 2
F: 2
C: --
G: --
C: --


D: --
A: 0
F: 0
C: --
G: --
C: --


"Guitar 1" is playing a pattern built around and including these chords but I need something for "Guitar 2" to play behind this part. I'm looking for something a lot lower that has a heavy sound but is still somewhat complimentary. It'll probably just be palm muted and in the background but it needs to fit of course. My band plays metal/metalcore style music so I'm trying to find the backing for this, essentially.

I was trying to use was these:

D: --
A: --
F: --
C: --
G: 7
C: 6


D: --
A: --
F: --
C: 7
G: 7
C: 7
But it sounds weird when you put them together.

My aforementioned limited knowledge of theory tells me that the root note for these chords is G. I'm trying to play them along with these lower chords that also have a root of Gb/G but for some reason it just sounds crappy.

I'm a little bit embarrassed to be asking such a noobish question but I really can't seem to find anything that compliments this nicely.

Thanks in advance for any advice!
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
Last edited by AndyR83 at Aug 20, 2009,
#2
From looking at your tuning and the notes you are playing, on Guitar 1 you are playing a C, G and F. As full chords they look like this:

D: 5
A: 7
F: 7
C: 7
G: 5
C: --

D: 5
A: 2
F: 2
C: 2
G: 0
C: --

D: --
A: 0
F: 7
C: 5
G: 5
C: 5

If you want to play the same notes on the lower two strings to compliment Guitar 1, you might try this:

D: --
A: --
F: --
C: --
G: 0
C: 0

D: --
A: --
F: --
C: --
G: 7
C: 7

D: --
A: --
F: --
C: --
G: 5
C: 5

This gives you C5, G5, and F5 respectively.

From what I can tell from what you have written so far, you are playing in the A Minor scale, so you might want to see if you can find the A Minor Scale for Dropped C tuning.

Hope this helped.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#3
Thanks a bunch for the advice. I'm curious though, how did you determine that the chords I posted correlate to the ones you listed? I'm just trying to advance my knowledge of theory and am curious.
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
#4
Quote by AndyR83
Thanks a bunch for the advice. I'm curious though, how did you determine that the chords I posted correlate to the ones you listed? I'm just trying to advance my knowledge of theory and am curious.


You didn't post any chords, those are 5th chords which arn't chords.

Sounds weird but it's true.
#5
They're not "5th chords", they're just diads ie 2 note intervals.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Quote by Nilpferdkoenig
You didn't post any chords, those are 5th chords which arn't chords.

Sounds weird but it's true.


I thought fifths were things like this:

-
-
-
5
3
-

Or so called "power chords." Am I incorrect?
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
#7
Quote by steven seagull
They're not "5th chords", they're just diads ie 2 note intervals.


I'm used to people referring to power chords as 5th chords.
#8
A power chord is a root and 5th, that's not what he posted.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
It is a powerchord. Dropped tuning.
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#10
The first could be seen as an inverted C5, but the two others are a G major and F major diad.
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#11
Quote by steven seagull
A power chord is a root and 5th, that's not what he posted.


But it's the octave of the root with it's 5th.

It's still the same notes.

Wouldn't we call


-
-3
-2
-
-
-

A/D5 or something?

A D5 with an A as the root, no?
#12
no, because there IS no root those two notes are just a G and a C, the interval between them is a 4th
Actually called Mark!

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#13
Quote by steven seagull
no, because there IS no root those two notes are just a G and a C, the interval between them is a 4th


But it's there, just higher
#14
But that doesn't make it the root - you typically only count intervals from the lowest note
Actually called Mark!

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#15
Quote by steven seagull
But that doesn't make it the root - you typically only count intervals from the lowest note


But couldn't you technically count it as a different voicing of a powerchord?
#16
Quote by steven seagull
no, because there IS no root those two notes are just a G and a C, the interval between them is a 4th

Right... =D
#17
Hello,

I have taken music theory I back at Undergrad in Bangalore, India. The correct harmoization goes I-V-IV in key of C major the chords C, G, and F, a retrogression I see no acceptance you are not writing in the style of J.S. Bach, no?

Thanks,

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#18
Quote by AndyR83
Thanks a bunch for the advice. I'm curious though, how did you determine that the chords I posted correlate to the ones you listed? I'm just trying to advance my knowledge of theory and am curious.


Well, looking at the three intervals, I found the notes that they contained, which was G,C for the first, G,B for the second, and F,A for the third. Using that, the simplest thing to do is to try to find the root and play that plus the fifth note.

So for the second, the root note of what you are playing is a G while the 5th is a D, so you play a G and a D on the first two strings. For the third, you use an F and the fifth from that is a C.

For the first 5th, I just used exactly the same thing that you played, which was a G and a C, but I just reversed them to be a C and a G. Since they are both C intervals (you are playing a C (no3) while the one I listed for Guitar 2 is a C5.)
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
Last edited by Xeron Brigs at Aug 24, 2009,