#1
A single note on the guitar can be seperated out into several pure tones.
A single note is a collection of pure tones and a chord is a collection of notes.

Different instruments play b notes differently. The root pure tone of the notes are the same but the over tones are different.
This is similar to the fact that it is possible to have multiple chords with the same root note.

Those different chords are named different things like b minor or b major.
Therefore a single b note could be further described by talking about the overtones.
It could be a b major note or a b minor or something else.

It could also be possible to scientificly alter the note to be different.
So instead of just going by ear with the distortion people could specify whether they want the note to be b minor or b major.

Is it possible to adjust the overtones of the b note without resorting to computers and pedals?
P.S. I didn't ask about pedals because it is very possible to do it with them.
edit: Do some tuners specify the overtones of a note or chords as well?
Last edited by Zombiechao at Aug 21, 2009,
#2
the overtones are just different octaves of the fundamental tone
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#3
Quote by Eggmond
the overtones are just different octaves of the fundamental tone


Not true, there are also 5ths and all kinds. For example, pinch harmonics bring out all kinds of notes that are definitely not just octaves of the fundamental.
#4
if you've ever seen the waveform of a note you'd realise how complicated they are - it is not easy to add or take away frequencies from a note. Also there is up 20.000 waves a second, removing overtones from something that fast oi damn near impossible
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#5
Quote by doive
if you've ever seen the waveform of a note you'd realise how complicated they are - it is not easy to add or take away frequencies from a note. Also there is up 20.000 waves a second, removing overtones from something that fast oi damn near impossible


No it's not.

Changing those, changes the timbre of a sound.

It's part of wave shaping technology used in hard and soft synths.

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