#1
I have two questions

why do the same chords have different names eg C major is Gsus4add13. is it just because they are technically possible or is it so they can fit into other keys? I noticed a lot of chords have a sus chord variation when i looked them up on guitar pro so that doesnt have major or minor tonality technically?


2nd question on the guitar you play the notes in chords in random order eg a major A bass note then E then A then csharp then E. Would these be classed as an inversion?
#2
All I know is this....hendrix played lots of inversions and this is what I can gather from them...

lets look at the "A shape barre chord" we will form a C cord out of it..

so it would look like this
3
5
5
5
3
X< starting on the 3rd fret of the A string...then the inversion of that chord is simple to figure...the notes being played are (C G C E G)

the fives remain and you invert the chord to look like this
X
5
5
5
7
X.....since the 5's still remain, leaving out strings 1 and 6 (both E) this still is a C chord notes played are (E G C E).... it is basically those three triads played together that make the chord a C....i dont fully understand why but this goes as follows all the way up the neck...alls i know is it allows you to barre the 5th fret and hammer on with your other fingers and then stick your ring finger back up to that 7 and strum ur chord again

im sure that
Last edited by Jeradmang at Aug 21, 2009,
#3
It's all based on the notes they contain

For example a C major is formed of C E G

First inversion of a C major chord turns the E into the bass note, giving you the notes E G C which are the same just with a different bass note.

Second inversion makes G the bass note, giving you G C E

Third inversion (if that even exists) turns it back into the standard C major
Last edited by Angry-Mares at Aug 21, 2009,
#4
Yes...that makes sense...so now since i dont fully understand let me ask a question

what would the "2nd inversion" look like...since i kinda illustrated the regular chord and 1st inversion here
Last edited by Jeradmang at Aug 21, 2009,
#5
chords will also have different names so they fit into the context of the song, and the chords surrounding that chord. It makes identifying the key easier when you can clearly see all the chords in the same mode
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#6
It has several possibilities for what it "looks" like. You can start at any C on the fretboard and that will be your root as long as it's the lowest note in the triad. If you're in first inversion with E as the bass note, find an E and form the triad based on the E, using it as your lowest note.

So for first inversion it could be something like

x
x
x
5 - G
3 - C
0 - E

Second inversion could be

x
x
x
2 - E
3 - C
3 - G

Just to avoid confusion.. no matter what note you start with, E G or C, it will still be considered a C major chord because it contains the C major triad (C E G)

edit: changed root to bass note (thanks Eastwinn for the correction)
Last edited by Angry-Mares at Aug 21, 2009,
#7
Quote by Jeradmang
Yes...that makes sense...so now since i dont fully understand let me ask a question

what would the "2nd inversion" look like...since i kinda illustrated the regular chord and 1st inversion here

A 2nd inversion of a C chord:
0
1
0
2
3
3
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#9
Regarding the first question.. it's because Guitar Pro doesn't know which note is the root note, so it gives you the names for all the possible roots from the notes you supplied. For example, take an A minor chord. The notes are A C E. If A is the root, then it's A minor, obviously. But what is C was the root? E is a Major 3rd away from C and A is a Major 6th away from C, so if C was the root it would be a C6 (no 5). What if E was the root? A is a Perfect 4th away from E and C is a Minor 6th away from E. That doesn't really form a chord at all but Guitar Pro does its best to name it for you anyway.

Take note that the root note and the bass note are two different things. In that A minor example, I was changing the root, not the bass. Inversions change the bass note, but not the root note.
#10
Quote by BBell
chords will also have different names so they fit into the context of the song, and the chords surrounding that chord. It makes identifying the key easier when you can clearly see all the chords in the same mode


this is the answer.
#11
okay i understand my first questions answer then, but as i said if you are playing the notes on guitar in a random order are they technically any kind of inversion? Are the bass notes in open position A Am C D E Em and G chords not all also root notes?
#12
Inversions are especially noticeable with a moving bass.

It gives variety, and are called inversions instead of a totally different chord name to give a better overview on things like key and scale choice.

If you want to play an arpeggio or a melody, then a chord in 2nd inversion will immediately tell you that it's the same chord as it's name (ie. C 2nd inversion contains the notes of the C chord, and thus the C major scale notes would still fit, which saves you thinking).

That's mostly helping the lead side.

When you encounter it when your functioning as the harmonic link in the band , it also provides you with easy to access info.

In for example, C 2nd inversion, you can still play a C chord, cause you can assume that the bass will play the 3rd (1st inversion) or 5th (2nd inversion) of the respective C chord.

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#13
The different "names" for most chords are as Eastwinn said, because Guitar Pro isn't perfect. However, there are cases where there are multiple correct names for them same thing. For example: C F G can be Csus4, Fsus2, or G7sus4. The name will be determined by the function, as there is no interval of a third in the chord, and no name is preferable to the others. Another example: C D E F G A B can be Cmaj13, Dmin13, Emin11(b9,b13), Fmaj13(#11), G13, Amin11(b13), or Bmin11(b5, b9, b13). Again the name will be determined by the function, but this time it is due to the fact that regardless of which note is in the bass, the chord will be a fully voiced 13th chord (which will usually take the V13 function).

As for inversions, root position has the root of the chord as the lowest voiced note; first inversion has the third; second inversion has the fifth; third inversion has the seventh. I would assume 4th would have the ninth, 5th would have the 11th, and 6th would have the 13th, but I'm not certain, as these don't come up often. The voicing of all the notes above the lowest never affect the inversion.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
The different "names" for most chords are as Eastwinn said, because Guitar Pro isn't perfect. However, there are cases where there are multiple correct names for them same thing. For example: C F G can be Csus4, Fsus2, or G7sus4. The name will be determined by the function, as there is no interval of a third in the chord, and no name is preferable to the others. Another example: C D E F G A B can be Cmaj13, Dmin13, Emin11(b9,b13), Fmaj13(#11), G13, Amin11(b13), or Bmin11(b5, b9, b13). Again the name will be determined by the function, but this time it is due to the fact that regardless of which note is in the bass, the chord will be a fully voiced 13th chord (which will usually take the V13 function).

As for inversions, root position has the root of the chord as the lowest voiced note; first inversion has the third; second inversion has the fifth; third inversion has the seventh. I would assume 4th would have the ninth, 5th would have the 11th, and 6th would have the 13th, but I'm not certain, as these don't come up often. The voicing of all the notes above the lowest never affect the inversion.



I understand ur logic, but I believe that the sound and function of the chord change to much in upper inversions.

If you invert chords above the 7th, then you end up with equally strong chords, and the upper notes could act as respective 3rds and 5ths, making it a different chord.

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#15
What inversion is it when the 6th is in the bass? Would you just call it (eg)G6(3rd inversion)?
#16
Quote by Declan87
What inversion is it when the 6th is in the bass? Would you just call it (eg)G6(3rd inversion)?


A G6 chord with the sixth in the bass is called Em7.

Quote by xxdarrenxx
I understand ur logic, but I believe that the sound and function of the chord change to much in upper inversions.

If you invert chords above the 7th, then you end up with equally strong chords, and the upper notes could act as respective 3rds and 5ths, making it a different chord.


In my second paragraph, I explained that thirteenths can have several names, and why. The same thing could apply with 9ths and 11ths as well, I imagine.