#1
I've been playing guitar for quite some time now and have gotten quite proficient at it. I would continue to play guitar, but I really want to try to pick up the violin. Of course that would mean dedicating more of my 'music time' to another instrument, but are there any 'risks'? Like, would the technique of the violin damage my guitar playing?
#2
I don't really think that it should hurt your playing. If anything it might make it better. I suppose that the cut into your play time might make you a little rusty but there shouldn't be anything too bad. Besides, if you really want to learn violin, then go ahead.

You should remain proficient at both if you play them for a little bit each week.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
#3
It shouldn't cause any problems. At the same time, the technique from the two instruments won't carry over at all.
#4
I played violin for a few years before picking up guitar, and played both for 5 years. Now, I only play guitar. My technique was not really hurt by either. You have to get used to different vibratos, but overall they don't really hurt your technique of the other.
#5
I did it and its not really that hard if you can read music. I would just buy like one of those $5 starter books. That's what I did and I have a lot of fun messin around with my violin. I can play some stuff from Phantom of the Opera and other little things I figured out by ear. I don't think you could really master it without lessons, but its fun to mess with. It doesnt hurt you guitar playing at all.
#6
shouldn't hurt it, and it'll help develop your ear as well since the violin is a fretless instrument, so you have to be able to hear the notes
#7
Quote by BeckWreck
I've been playing guitar for quite some time now and have gotten quite proficient at it. I would continue to play guitar, but I really want to try to pick up the violin. Of course that would mean dedicating more of my 'music time' to another instrument, but are there any 'risks'? Like, would the technique of the violin damage my guitar playing?



If your interested in it.... yes it's advisable.

I have a friend who can play guitar, violin, and banjo..... all really well.
shred is gaudy music
#8
I believe pull offs and hammer ons apply to all string instruments, no? I've seen cello players do trills and use those techniques before, as for violin I can't really tell what they're doing, but idk. Also, your callouses are gonna be HUGE xD
I've gotten a lot of LOLs in my time but I choose not to sig them to not look like a pretentious douchebag





#9
Quote by Misticalz
I believe pull offs and hammer ons apply to all string instruments, no? I've seen cello players do trills and use those techniques before, as for violin I can't really tell what they're doing, but idk. Also, your callouses are gonna be HUGE xD


They don't talk about "hammerons and pulloffs". On bowed strings we do use a similar technique, which we call "slurring". Saying that having these two similar techniques will make things easier between the two, is like saying that the fact they both have strings and you use your hands will make things easier. The thing with the techniques, is that a violinist holds the violin much different than a guitarist holds the guitar. A violinist's wrist is between different; a violinists fingers are at a different angle to the strings; The right hand technique is completely different using a bow.
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
They don't talk about "hammerons and pulloffs". On bowed strings we do use a similar technique, which we call "slurring". Saying that having these two similar techniques will make things easier between the two, is like saying that the fact they both have strings and you use your hands will make things easier. The thing with the techniques, is that a violinist holds the violin much different than a guitarist holds the guitar. A violinist's wrist is between different; a violinists fingers are at a different angle to the strings; The right hand technique is completely different using a bow.



+1

In general, it wont help your guitar playing, but it will give you a more broad perspective which contributes to you being a more well rounded musician. Plus if you love the instrument, you'll enjoy it.... which IMO is the best reason to pick it up.
shred is gaudy music
#13
Quote by wesselbindt
I know a guy who started playing guitar after 9 years of violin. He's played guitar for a few years now, and he progressed faster than guitarists usually do. So I suppose it's quite good for your playing.


Going from guitar to sax, or flute, or drums, or keys, or vocals, or oboe, or anything really, will be easier than starting that instrument with no experience in anything. You'll just be generally familiar with making music, which helps greatly.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
Going from guitar to sax, or flute, or drums, or keys, or vocals, or oboe, or anything really, will be easier than starting that instrument with no experience in anything. You'll just be generally familiar with making music, which helps greatly.


Yeah it helped me for guitar knowing music.

But be prepared to suck at violin for a while as there are no frets. It takes a while to get the first position pitch perfect, and a lot harder for other positions.
#16
I play a bit of Mandolin. Tuning is the same as Violin but its fretted and plucked (usually very fast). Its a great half-way between the two as you learn the fingering positions etc.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x

#17
as people have said above me, you will find you will progress a lot faster on violin. Because you already have that musicality, and knowledge. Picking up new instruments is always a plus, you will find you improvise in certain ways on different instruments too.

I find that impro on my Clarinet really open my mind up when I impro on guitar. Then on piano, you've got 10 notes you can play at once. Going from Clarinet to piano was heaven
#18
Quote by BeckWreck
I've been playing guitar for quite some time now and have gotten quite proficient at it. I would continue to play guitar, but I really want to try to pick up the violin. Of course that would mean dedicating more of my 'music time' to another instrument, but are there any 'risks'? Like, would the technique of the violin damage my guitar playing?

no, nothing would "damage" you guitar playing. the only risk would be that you end up spending more time on the violin than guitar. that would make your guitar playing not as good.

violin is a hard instrument to learn and be good at. there arent any frets, (unless you get on that has them but they arent as common) so you need a good ear to get the right notes. but if you want to, go for it. maybe you'll like it more than guitar.
#19
Quote by isaac_bandits
They don't talk about "hammerons and pulloffs". On bowed strings we do use a similar technique, which we call "slurring". Saying that having these two similar techniques will make things easier between the two, is like saying that the fact they both have strings and you use your hands will make things easier. The thing with the techniques, is that a violinist holds the violin much different than a guitarist holds the guitar. A violinist's wrist is between different; a violinists fingers are at a different angle to the strings; The right hand technique is completely different using a bow.



Well, like I said, I don't really know what a violinist is doing since they hold it up and stuff.


Howabout you forget guitar and violin and learn the all mighty SYNTHESIZER
I've gotten a lot of LOLs in my time but I choose not to sig them to not look like a pretentious douchebag





#20
Quote by isaac_bandits
It shouldn't cause any problems. At the same time, the technique from the two instruments won't carry over at all.


I don't know about that. They are certainly very different, but the notes are fingered in a similar method to a guitar, and the finger independence achieved from guitar would transfer over as well I think.

To the OP, definitely go for it. It will probably help your ear a lot because of the whole intonation thing where you have to find the correct pitches without the aid of frets.
#21
Quote by Flobbey
I don't know about that. They are certainly very different, but the notes are fingered in a similar method to a guitar, and the finger independence achieved from guitar would transfer over as well I think.


If you've ever seen a violinist's left hand, you would know that the fingers are held much closer to parallel to the strings, while a guitarist's fingers are much closer to perpendicular. Also, the fingers need to be placed in the exact right spot for the correct intonation. There isn't really anything alike for the fingers. The violin's position also dictates that a different arm position must be used.

Right hand technique is unquestionably unrelated, going from a pick to a bow.
#22
Quote by isaac_bandits
If you've ever seen a violinist's left hand, you would know that the fingers are held much closer to parallel to the strings, while a guitarist's fingers are much closer to perpendicular. Also, the fingers need to be placed in the exact right spot for the correct intonation. There isn't really anything alike for the fingers. The violin's position also dictates that a different arm position must be used.

Right hand technique is unquestionably unrelated, going from a pick to a bow.


There is still a significant similarity, I would say what is more important than what angle your hand is at, or specifically where you put your fingers, is what muscle groups are used, and that the fingers are trained to be independent. Its the same with piano, very different technique but still, there would be transfer of ability to a large degree because there are many similarities in muscle groups and basic motions.
#23
There's no similarity at all - the hand is in a completely different position and operates in a completely different way when playing the violin.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#24
Quote by Flobbey
There is still a significant similarity, I would say what is more important than what angle your hand is at, or specifically where you put your fingers, is what muscle groups are used, and that the fingers are trained to be independent. Its the same with piano, very different technique but still, there would be transfer of ability to a large degree because there are many similarities in muscle groups and basic motions.


The hand dexterity from guitar can help with violin, but the technique is different. You don't need to play an instrument to have good hand dexterity. You can get it from typing....
#25
Quote by steven seagull
There's no similarity at all - the hand is in a completely different position and operates in a completely different way when playing the violin.


Doesn't matter. You still push down with the same muscles and the fingers still alternate in a similar manner. The left hand shares a large similarity, actually.
#26
Quote by isaac_bandits
The hand dexterity from guitar can help with violin, but the technique is different. You don't need to play an instrument to have good hand dexterity. You can get it from typing....


The muscle development is a large factor, and the left hands are quite similar between the two. Different angles of approach, but many of the common movements are shared.
#27
i cant see how it could be a bad thing.

I started the guitar a year ago after playing the violin for over 8 years..

I feel its bettered my playing on both instruments.. I've picked up many guitar techniques (for example hammer on, pull off, vibrato and playing very fast lol )really early on due to playing the violin.

The only negative is when i started bending on the violin haha.

go for it dude. It should help your theory too.
#28
Quote by isaac_bandits
The thing with the techniques, is that a violinist holds the violin much different than a guitarist holds the guitar. A violinist's wrist is between different; a violinists fingers are at a different angle to the strings; The right hand technique is completely different using a bow.
and because if this I'd seriously recommend getting a teacher to make sure you're at least holding it right to start with TS. If you don't start out with the right technique you've got no chance of getting decent, and you'll probably injure yourself in the process.

I do think there is some crossover though - I played violin for years when I was younger, and when I took up guitar I found fretting relatively easy, as it was similar enough to violin for the skills to be somewhat transferable. No its not the same, but it still helps. I never 'learnt' to do hammer-ons and pull-offs - I did them naturally from the first day I picked a guitar up, from my violin days. It does mean that when I get lazy I resort to vioin-style vibrato tho lol

I think guitar give you lot less of a head start playing the violin than the other way round though. For starters you'll have to develop your ear and get used to placing your fingers really accurately for violin - you won't have the luxury of frets.
#29
Quote by isaac_bandits
It shouldn't cause any problems. At the same time, the technique from the two instruments won't carry over at all.


the techniques are the same in both.. well almost

defo get a teacher if possible... even with a teacher i learned bad technique and had to start again.. i wasnt anything major but its just stuff like holding the bow and violin that affect your playing
Last edited by kevinherrera at Aug 24, 2009,
#30
Quote by kevinherrera
the techniques are the same in both.. well almost


Go get try and play a violin with proper technique, and then tell me that again.