#1
Hi guys! Sorry if this thread has been done before, I did a quick search on the forums and google but was not able to find what I'm looking for.

My problem is that I'm unable to memorize and identify notes that I play on guitar. For example, if you play me an F and then an A, these notes sound different to me, I know they aren't the same. Four seconds later, you play the A again I can't tell you that it's not the F.

Maybe if I had some way to associate the tone with some kind of visual that would help me, but I'm not sure..

The main reason this has came up is because I'm trying to learn the notes on the guitar, and I'd much rather be able to identify my position on the fretboard by hearing a single note, as to counting the frets.

Also, I dream of one day being able to tune my guitar without using a battery eating gizmo that hides itself in a different place each day.

Please advise!
#2
study intervals, aka the space between notes. theres some songs that you can think of when theyre played to help memorize them: ie, minor 2nd is jaws, major 6 is the nbc news theme, etc etc.
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#3
Few people can do that. It's called perfect pitch and it's a trait that you either do or do not have. However, it's not that important and many people dislike having it. (Do you really want to know what note your lawnmower sounds?) You should be able to tell the difference between the interval F to A and the interval F to Ab, however, and you should be able to tell that A to C# is the same interval (major third) as F to A, and that G to Bb is the same interval (minor third) as F to Ab.
#4
At the start of your post you are talking about perfect pitch. What I do to maintain mine is when I wake up each morning I choose a note to sing. I then go and test it on my keyboard to make sure I got it right, if I haven't I correct it.
When you first start out, you should probably just start on C each morning, once you get this right each morning for a week, add another note in. Although, if you know one note, and are good with your intervals, you should be able to just relate your other notes to the C you already know.

Tuning your guitar without a tuner. For me, I know exactly how the first chord in Blackbird sounds. I know that the G on the E string must sound like this and I tune it to that. then I just tune the other strings working off my E string.
Once you know your guitar and have played for a while, you will know how an open strum is meant to sound. I tjust comes with hearing it so often. I played blackbird a lot (it was one of the first songs I learnt) so that is what I use.

Quote by bangoodcharlote
However, it's not that important and many people dislike having it. (Do you really want to know what note your lawnmower sounds?)

My Dad tends to speak in the key of F Major, except when he is angry, then he tends to go down Eb.

He was mowing the lawn this morning, my memory aint that good, but I think the general vibe was pretty G-ish
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 22, 2009,
#5
Quote by mdwallin
My Dad tends to speak in the key of F Major, except when he is angry, then he tends to go down Eb.

He was mowing the lawn this morning, my memory aint that good, but I think the general vibe was pretty G-ish


I don't believe this at all.
#7
Perfect pitch to the point where you know what pitch lawnmowers, ceiling fans are making is not that uncommon. Certainly not average, but not 1 in a 1000 either. A colleague of mine at work actually has sound to color sythestitia (sp?). That's a lot rarer, and it's a physical condition - an MRI he had as a kid actually showed the connection. Needless to say, knowing the pitch a dog is barking in is no problem to him, but he says that going to a restaurant or any public place where there are lots of different sound sources is an absolute head f*ck.

I've read that it's possible for a person with good relative pitch to develop something that behaves like perfect pitch by memorizing the pitch of just one note, and recognizing everything else relative to that.
#8
se012101: I'm pretty sure you're right on that last bit. I'm sure a lot of guitarists who don't have perfect pitch can still recognize an E3. From that, they could recognize other notes, I suppose.