#1
I have a quick question, how are piano chords transcribed into guitar chords?
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#2
notes are notes, it doesn't matter what instrument
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#3
well, a guitar generally won't be able to play the same exact voicings as the piano because we only have six strings so we can only play six notes at a time.

but the chord is usually figured out and then you play the closest thing to it that you can
#4
Not sure what you mean by 'piano chords'. If you mean sheet music..

it is all notes. Just be wary that guitar is in fact a transposing instrument, when we play middle C it will not sound like the middle C a piano plays (which is at concert pitch).

Here is an example of the diatonic chords of C Major, and how you can play them on guitar


although, if wanted at concert pitch you would have to play everything an octave up. Because guitars are so limited with just 6 string, we do not usually bother about this and just play the notes in the most suitable and conveniant way we can.
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 22, 2009,
#5
if a piano is playing a minor, i play... a minor
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#6
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if a piano is playing a minor, i play... a minor


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#7
Quote by PinoyxRockar
I have a quick question, how are piano chords transcribed into guitar chords?


You just play the notes the piano is playing on your guitar. Sometimes this isn't possible due to a guitar having a smaller range than a piano, or just some very awkward stretches when many small intervals are involved, due to the guitar only being able to sound one note per string.
#8
It depends if the chord voicing is important to the structure of the song or not. If it's not then just play the chord in the position it is most comfortable in.

If it IS for example if chord extensions are forming part of the melody line or the bass line is not being played as root notes then it is important to keep the voicing f the chord so as not to jump around octaves too much. for example if in C major the melody goes C D E (without octave jumps) and the chords are C Em7 and Am then i would make sure that the C D E was kept in the same octave, so not putting the D in the Em7 on only the high B string followed by the E in the A being only voiced on the low a-string for example. does that make sense?

i would not play x32010 022030 575585 as the E in the last chord is sounded low down so would not be obvious in the melody.

Most of the time however voicings should be taken by what is easiest, particularly if you will struggle to play the same voicing as a piano.
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#9
Want to know a really trippy fact? Chords, are chords. Oh and another thing, notes are notes. Wooowww man. Im like totally tripping out.
#10
^These responses don't help. You're just being an ass. I think TC was asking about some of the huge chords pianos can do. Most of these are impossible on the guitar in standard tuning. Most of the time you'll just have to settle for the smaller voicing possible on guitar. For chords with important notes, IE, 7ths, 9ths, 13ths and so on. The first interval to drop is the 5th. Next IIRC is dropping the root. Like, if you were to play an E9, you could just play E-G#-D#-F#. Leaving out the B note, as its not crucial to the sound. If you had an even bigger chord that had more notes, I'd leave the root out next. Just never leave out the third, 7ths or the highest interval in the chord. Unless another instrument is playing it.
#11
What the third post said is right. The notes on the piano voicings are too close to each other for a guitarist to play. Because the guitar is tuned to 5ths and 4ths our voicings have to be much more spread out.
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#12
Quote by MadAudioMan
^These responses don't help. You're just being an ass. I think TC was asking about some of the huge chords pianos can do. Most of these are impossible on the guitar in standard tuning. Most of the time you'll just have to settle for the smaller voicing possible on guitar. For chords with important notes, IE, 7ths, 9ths, 13ths and so on. The first interval to drop is the 5th. Next IIRC is dropping the root. Like, if you were to play an E9, you could just play E-G#-D#-F#. Leaving out the B note, as its not crucial to the sound. If you had an even bigger chord that had more notes, I'd leave the root out next. Just never leave out the third, 7ths or the highest interval in the chord. Unless another instrument is playing it.


Only leave the root out if another instrument is playing it.
#13
I've been attempting to learn piano recently, one thing I've noticed about it is when you change chords on a guitar you change to specific chord "shapes", piano you don't really think about chords in terms of shapes, it's more like, building them from scratch using '1, 3, 5' etc. when changing chords a piano player will usually choose the notes closest to where his hand was on the last chord, eg: say they were going from C to G, say C is '1, 3, 5' -> C,E, & G (lowest to highest note) they might play G as '3, 5, 1' ->B,D & G. it's the same "G" in both chords. it means if they're say, watching their left hand play bass they can judge where the keys are better, it makes changes alot smoother and easier. whereas inversions are novelties for guitarists, on keys they're the norm.

to sumerise, try using inversions of chords, using chords with notes close together (as in prev. posts. remember a pianist can only span about an octave or so with his/her right hand), and maybe keeping one note common to both chords when changing chords, or at least, keeping them really close together.
It might help phycelogically if you think about like, chord formulas, rather than chord shapes when trying it, I don't know...
Last edited by jimRH7 at Aug 23, 2009,
#14
^ I do actually picture piano chords as shapes. It's helpful, just as it is on guitar.


To answer the TS's question though..... The notes are the same, but the voicings on the piano aren't always playable on the guitar. Especially tight voicings where the notes are close together.....easy on piano.... not always the case on guitar.


If your trying to convert piano music to guitar, like exactly as written... you will run into parts that you just can't play. You can though, if you have the experience, find ways to arrange those parts for guitar.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 23, 2009,
#15
Quote by jimRH7
I've been attempting to learn piano recently, one thing I've noticed about it is when you change chords on a guitar you change to specific chord "shapes", piano you don't really think about chords in terms of shapes, it's more like, building them from scratch using '1, 3, 5' etc. when changing chords a piano player will usually choose the notes closest to where his hand was on the last chord, eg: say they were going from C to G, say C is '1, 3, 5' -> C,E, & G (lowest to highest note) they might play G as '3, 5, 1' ->B,D & G. it's the same "G" in both chords. it means if they're say, watching their left hand play bass they can judge where the keys are better, it makes changes alot smoother and easier. whereas inversions are novelties for guitarists, on keys they're the norm.

to sumerise, try using inversions of chords, using chords with notes close together (as in prev. posts. remember a pianist can only span about an octave or so with his/her right hand), and maybe keeping one note common to both chords when changing chords, or at least, keeping them really close together.
It might help phycelogically if you think about like, chord formulas, rather than chord shapes when trying it, I don't know...


I think of piano chords as "shapes" too. Its just like on guitar, only you have to displace your fingers for the black keys.

And I use lots of inversions on guitar. The lowest note the guitarist is playing generally isn't very important, since the bassist notes will determine the inversion. I like to use inversions just to make it sound smoother.
#16
Quote by GuitarMunky

If your trying to convert piano music to guitar, like exactly as written... you will run into parts that you just can't play. You can though, if you have the experience, find ways to arrange those parts for guitar.


that's exactly what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to tab out Luvsic by Nujabes. I have the sheet music for it, but I have no idea what I'm doing. I have my cousin read my the sheet music as I can't read it myself. I
"When words fail, music speaks"

Gamertag - Acoustickk

Call me Vincent
#17
^you should learn to - it's not hard, just takes practice. Sure you'll be slow at first but you'll pick it up pretty fast.
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#18
www.musictheory.net has a great note trainer, one of the best things I've ever forced myself to do.
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#19
Quote by PinoyxRockar
that's exactly what I'm trying to do. I'm trying to tab out Luvsic by Nujabes. I have the sheet music for it, but I have no idea what I'm doing. I have my cousin read my the sheet music as I can't read it myself. I


Well, you have to do things that are realistic for your current skill level. I would say you're in over your head there.


I don't really have a quick fix type of solution. There are alot of skills you would need to develop and that takes time (like years not days or weeks).

Maybe for now you could use your ear and come up with a simpler version on the guitar and/or work on something more realistic.
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