#1
I'm a bit confused. I get basic timing with the metronome. To play quarter notes, you just turn your metronome on, and play one note per click. At 60bpm you are playing one note per second. To play eight notes you play two notes per click, so you are playing 2 notes per second, the same as quarter notes at 120 bpm. Then sixteenth notes, 4 nots per click. At 60bpm, thats 4 nots per second. Also, I have a thing on my metronome that can be set to Quarter, Eight, Sixteenths ect...... so that instead of playing 4 notes per click at 60 bpm, I set it to sixteenth notes and I play on every click.

Is all the info above correct?

O.k then, now I'm confused about triplets. I have a thing on my metronome which makes it click 3 times on each beat (If I set it at 60 bpm, it would click 3 times a second, sorry if this is confusing) Is that playing triplets? Say if a tab had the Q sign above a bunch of numbers, but it grouiped three of them as triplets, how would I play this with a metronome?

Final question- this tab-

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/b/buckethead/welcome_to_buckethead_land_ver4_tab.htm

Scroll down to the third bar. See that big line of sixteenth notes with a 6 above it (Sextuplet time?) If my metronome was set to a6th notes, how would I play this?

Thanks in advance for answering this long and overly confusing question.
#2
For triplets practice, set you metronome to 60, and instead of playing 1 note per beat and counting 1, 2, 3, 4 etc., you count 1, 2, 3 on every beat.

If in 4/4 time you have one bar with a 1/4 note, followed by two 1/8 notes, then a triplet, then four 1/16 notes you would count like this:-

one, two &, three e &, four e & a
#3
For triplets, how you accent makes a big difference, both in your actual attack on the notes, and in how you count -

ONE, two, three, ONE, two, three.

Or you can do an off-beat accent the second time for a different feel:

ONE, two, three, one, TWO, three, and so on...

As lufc said, the beats fall on the ones.
#4
So if it weas set to sixteenth notes, I would ignore the clicks inbetween, only the accented 60bpm click, and each time that clicked, I would play 3 notes?
What if the triplets were sixteenth notes? Would I play 3 notes for each sixteenth note?
#5
If you set you metronome to regular quarter notes, that corresponds to each bass and snare in a simple rock beat.

With that setting:
1 note per 4 clicks: whole note.
1 note per 2 clicks: half note.
1 note per click: quarter note.
3 notes per 2 clicks: quarter note triplets.
2 notes per click: 8th notes
3 notes per click: 8th note triplets.
4 notes per click: 16th notes.
5 notes per click: quintuplets.
6 notes per click: 16th note triplets, or sextuplets.
7 notes per click: septuplets.
8 notes per click: 32 notes.

Beyond that your pretty much in the land of insanity. Hope this helps some.
#6
Quote by se012101
If you set you metronome to regular quarter notes, that corresponds to each bass and snare in a simple rock beat.

With that setting:
1 note per 4 clicks: whole note.
1 note per 2 clicks: half note.
1 note per click: quarter note.
3 notes per 2 clicks: quarter note triplets.
2 notes per click: 8th notes
3 notes per click: 8th note triplets.
4 notes per click: 16th notes.
5 notes per click: quintuplets.
6 notes per click: 16th note triplets, or sextuplets.
7 notes per click: septuplets.
8 notes per click: 32 notes.

Beyond that your pretty much in the land of insanity. Hope this helps some.


Thanks, I understand the bucketheadland thing now, but I thought triplets were 3 notes per quarter note click?
#7
There are many kinds of triplets. The ones you mentioned above are 8th note triplets. Any time you squeeze 3 notes into the space of 2 they are triplets - ie. 8th notes = 2 notes per click. Squeeze 3 notes into that space, and you've got 8th note triplets.
#8
Ok, so sixteenth note sextuplets would be 6 notes in the space of 4 sixteenth notes, or one quarter note?
#9
Quote by GoldfishMoon
Ok, so sixteenth note sextuplets would be 6 notes in the space of 4 sixteenth notes, or one quarter note?


Both. 4 sixteenth notes = 1 quarter note
#10
I find it helpful not to count, but to recite patterns of syllables to the beat. Konnakol, the Carnatic system of vocal percussion is built around this concept. The advantage to this is that you develop an understanding of what each rate feels like, and become comfortable switching between rates.

The specific syllable patterns vary from area to area in India, but for the sake of giving you some understanding...

one note per beat = ta
two notes per beat = ta ka
three notes per beat = ta ka di
four notes per beat = ta ka di mi

The syllables should be of even length, with "ta" falling on the beat. When counting threes the advantage of the system is minimal, but when switching between a rate of threes and a rate of fives, the benefits are obvious.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#11
^ interesting. Shawn Lane talks about this very briefly in one vid on You tube. Counting numbers is very cumbersome (they become a tongue twister) when going above a certain speed. What are the syllables for when you for when you are playing more than 4 notes per beat? And how is it handled when you have varying notes lengths within a single beat? Like an 16th followed by an 8th, followed by a 16th?
#12
Quote by se012101
^ interesting. Shawn Lane talks about this very briefly in one vid on You tube. Counting numbers is very cumbersome (they become a tongue twister) when going above a certain speed. What are the syllables for when you for when you are playing more than 4 notes per beat? And how is it handled when you have varying notes lengths within a single beat? Like an 16th followed by an 8th, followed by a 16th?


As I said, the syllable patterns change depending on the area in India, but IIRC

rate of 5 - ta ka da ka di
rate of 6 - ta ka da ka di mi
rate of 7 - ta ka di mi chu ti ka

The patterns don't particularly matter. What matter is that you have a number of syllables equal to the rate you intend to play, which is easy to say quickly, and where every syllable begins with a hard consonant sound. Reciting numbers becomes tricky, for example, because the w sound at the beginning of the word "one" has no percussive quality.

As for changing in the middle of the beat, I can only imagine that it would sound sensible if there was a common divisor. One note at a rate of 4s followed by four at a rate of 6s, four notes at a rate of 6 followed by three at a rate of 9s, etc. In you example, I'd just recite ta ka di mi, and let the 8th note last for both vocal beats.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#13
Thanks man! This is very helpful. I'm going to incorporate it into my practice.
#14
Quote by se012101
If you set you metronome to regular quarter notes, that corresponds to each bass and snare in a simple rock beat.

With that setting:
1 note per 4 clicks: whole note.
1 note per 2 clicks: half note.
1 note per click: quarter note.
3 notes per 2 clicks: quarter note triplets.
2 notes per click: 8th notes
3 notes per click: 8th note triplets.
4 notes per click: 16th notes.
5 notes per click: quintuplets.
6 notes per click: 16th note triplets, or sextuplets.
7 notes per click: septuplets.
8 notes per click: 32 notes.

Beyond that your pretty much in the land of insanity. Hope this helps some.

Thanks...really helped me...didnt know what i was playing...but now i know i am playing sextuplets
[ ZAKK ]

Gear:
Dean Dimebag Far Beyond Driven tribute ML
Epiphone () Zakk Wylde Bullseye Les Paul
Dunlop Dimebag Wah
Boss DS-1 Distortion
Line 6 Spider III 12x10 120 watt
(very loud)
#15
Quote by se012101
Thanks man! This is very helpful. I'm going to incorporate it into my practice.


You should notice that you become much more comfortable with how a certain rate sounds and feels. Eventually, you won't really feel the need to count every 6 or 4 (or 5 or 7), you'll just be comfortable with how it feels and sounds.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.