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#1
Hey Ug'ers.

I'm really curious, and I want to practise guitar for between 3-8 hours a day.
Thing Is I don't really know what to do within' 8 hours?
I mean my usual practise is that i go on to guitar pro 5 and usuall learn to play leads for 4 years i've been doing.

I mean, right now I am studying for grade 4.

So could you help me construct maybe a time table?

Also what do you guys do for 8 hours?

If you are going to suggest theory, could you tell me what to study? I mean I know my shapres and flates and triads and stuff like that.


Okay thanks guys.

P.S how do I upload pics if they are on my computer not on the internet?

Thanks.
#2
to upload pics, click on my profile and click my pictures, then hit upload pictures and find the pic in your computer and upload it
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#4
if you just want to kill time then learn entire albums. when a friend of mine gets bored he just plays through the hyde park gig of the chili peppers.
#5
I think if you're practising for 8 hours a day...it would just be jamming along to stuff you know, trying to work out songs by ear or attempting some of your own material. I don't have time for that kinda session, as much as I'd like to every now and again, but studying theory is kinda tedious and should be an hour at a time or so before you get back to doing what you feel like doing, or you'll just get bored and lose motivation.
#6
dunno bout anyone else but i usually spend time practising the songs im learning or know, (perfecting solos, cleaner play, sweeping etc) then move onto sweep pick practising with a metronome n gettin faster etc going through scale shapes in diffrent keys, writing my own material n just generally messing around XD but thats only a few things, i try to do lots of different things each session to stop boredom. As far as theory goes, I only dabble in dat sorta shiz once a week or so.. (Circle of fifths, scales, scale degrees, key changes blah blah)
Hope this helps =]
#7
if you have 8 hours worth of music available to you. learn them all on guitar.
#9
there are many good articles and lessons concerning practice
just look them up
a timetable would be very good, you also need a way to observe your progress, to know that you are getting better (e.g. playing a scale at 100BPM and getting to 150BPM after some time shows progress and gives motivation)
#10
People don't practise 8 hours a day. They might play 8 hours a day while surfing the net or something, but focused practise for 8 hours would just wear you out.

2 hours a day is plenty.
#11
A timetable might help but it could also make it quite boring and really kinda take the fun out of it and thus you'll probably end up NOT doing the full thing anyway haha.
I think the best thing is just to really try a whole load of different things and try and work on what you're not good at.
There's only a certain amount of time you can go over scales or technique and learn something from it, but with things like improvising and playing over/learning songs, you learn more about "feel" which is something that you can never really stop picking up on.
Also if you find you're getting bored of playing the same old songs again and again, try learning some different genres like jazz and classical, fingerstyle etc. (assuming you don't already of course). A lot of very talented players lack diversity and I think it's a shame really.
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#12
well if u practice for 8 hours a day then youll get fed up of hte guitar. and youll get RSI. 4 hours is more than enough, i practice about 1.5 (stupid college). when i was about grade 3/4 i was doing 3 hours. and as long as you practice instead of moodling about then you improve VERY QUICKLY, as to what to practice. work on consistency, at that level just playing tends to improve your skills, so find something that challenges you and play
#13
Here's how I form my practice routine:

warm up / classical technique - 25min

these two alternate every other day:
scales, arpeggios, improvisation -1 hour
chord and rhythm - 1 hour

sight reading - 1 hour

repertoire - 1-2 hours

ear training - 45 min

music theory



Comes out to about 4-5 hours throughout the day. To keep a long practice routine you have to switch what you're working on whenever you find yourself not concentrating on whatever you're working on and of course take at least a 20 minute break in between each hour of practice
#14
Quote by griffRG7321
People don't practise 8 hours a day. They might play 8 hours a day while surfing the net or something, but focused practise for 8 hours would just wear you out.

2 hours a day is plenty.


Pretty much.

I used to think I practiced like 8 hours a day, but it wasn't until I really learned to properly practice that I realized I was just fiddling around for most of that time. Lots of people play guitar all day long, but if you aren't focused and challenging yourself with uncharted territory you aren't going to be progressing much. There certainly nothing wrong with playing guitar all day ( ) just don't fool yourself into believing that its "practice".
Last edited by Flobbey at Aug 22, 2009,
#16
Quote by rockinrider55

Comes out to about 4-5 hours throughout the day.


And how many hours social life?
#17
Quote by deHufter
And how many hours social life?

I dunno for other : but 8 hour of sleep , 8 hours of work, 4 hours of pratice ( and just playing whatever I feel like non-seriously most of the time ) and 4 hours of what I want, usualy social or video game
that's how I view it anyway

on the topic : I build my pratice schedule week by week, so every week I cover everything, with a emphasis on what's my priority, and it don't get repetitive

(sorry for my english)
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#18
Usually when i practice for more than three hours a day, it is just me playing around everything i know how to play.
I will make these funny pretendenations i am at a gig and would be playing these covers, except i improvise and put more of my own style into them.

Say im playing Scar Tissue by the Red Hot Chili Peppers, for the solos i use more of a modern metal type of soloing practice, say sweeping and chromaticness.
Or Im playing Dead by Norther, the final chorus and outro i am making some silly solo.

So play everything you know, but improvise more so you can have more of an idea of how you would play.
Also there are times i will sit on the couch with my amp on and will midlessy watch tv and just practice scales.
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#19
Have a mix of serious (and boring) rhythm practice and some improvisation as well. And then the usual learn songs, entire albums if you like all of the songs.
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#20
Hey!
Well my teacher always says to me that you get better faster by doing exercises! Like doing scales and knowing them until you can skip parts and play them where ever you like on the fingerboard. Fingerpicking exercises for the right hand aswel eg:p i a m, p m a i . Things like that!

He always said that when he was in college he knew guys that practiced for 5 hours everyday! But because it was only playing the songs that they have learned and messing about on the guitar they did get better as fast as others. Others which practiced for an hour but, they structured it by doing finger exercises and warm-ups and scales !

anyhelp!?
#21
Quote by deHufter
And how many hours social life?
Well during the school year:
wake up a 5am
practice classical for ~2 hours (mainly technique maybe some repertoire brush ups)
go to school
get out of school @ 12
homework
practice guitar (electric routine above then classical repertoire)


I'm finished at about 5 or 6 pm, which leaves plenty of time to go out with the girlfriend or find some players to go jam with.

I am now going to be a junior taking AP/Honors classes where I ended up with a little higher than a 4.0, have a girlfriend, time to go out with friends, and lots of weekend gig opportunities.

The no social life thing just seems to be an excuse for those who want to justify them not putting in time to practice. As long as you are careful (ie not practicing for the 5 hours straight) and stretch properly, you can stay productive for you practice sessions.
#22
Quote by mdwallin


that is what I wrote in the last thread that asked this..


What I wrote in the first thread I remember asking this:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1120073

My practise hours in a day are a bit split up, 'cause I have school. below is my timetable.
In the morning:
As soon as a I wake-up I will pick a random note to sing. Then I will go to my keyboard, to make sure I got it right, or correct it. This is part of my aim to get perfect pitch. I then make a few chords and try to pick out each note in them.
If I have time I run through some scales that I know I still need some practice on. To finish up I sing some base notes that I could use that scale to improvise over, and have a little fun.
On the tram on the way to school I turn on my ipod and get a pen and some manuscript to do a bit of transcription. This gets me some odd looks, but whatevs.

First school break:
After I eat (very important) I jam with mates. We are all around the same level and it can really help to jam with other people. We take turns to shout out random key changes, or timing variations. The first school break doesn't go for very long, so we don't do much.

second school break:
I go through my scales and arpeggios. Do some sight reading. Put my ipod on shuffle and play along to songs. I then work on any songs im making. Then I work on any songs I need to have done for school.

after school:
On the way home, on the tram: if im not with friends I'll do some more transcription, and whatever music theory homework I got in class that day (any other subject I tend to make sure I do as much as possible during class and private study). When I get home (after eating some more) I do half an hour of aural training (interval recognition, more transcription, chords, and other stuff), then a heap of sight reading. The sight reading usually inspires me to make a few little diddles which I tend to record or put on my loop pedal to stuff around on.
Then I do a lot of theory study, since I do a lot of theory exams. This usually includes going over terms (which I suck at memorising, since I hardly ever see them used) and composition stuff (voicings of chords and 'rules'). I know I need a lot more work on the exam material, as its a more traditional stream, and the rules and terms are a little different to the jazz im used to.
I go through school songs some more. I go through exam songs some more (moste of my exams are not done by my school). Then I go through songs I want to learn. I work a little more on whatever I'm writing at the time. and then last but not least, I just stuff around and have fun. But almost as a rule, I finish on what I need to work on most. I'm not sure why, most people finish on the fun stuff
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 22, 2009,
#23
Quote by rockinrider55

get out of school @ 12


Well, that saves you plenty of time indeed.

Quote by rockinrider55

The no social life thing just seems to be an excuse for those who want to justify them not putting in time to practice.


Not really, the no social life thing is for people who'd like do other stuff rather than practice guitar for 5 hours a day, and still play guitar after that in their 'free' time. Don't get me wrong, you should do whatever you want, but i dont bother spending so fricking much time in my life playing guitar ending up in a caféband earning a crate of beer and 200 bucks every week. like to play with my band once a week and have gigs once a couple of months so i dont practice or play more than 2 hours a day.
But everybody should do what he or she wants.
#24
I don't have a timetable, and I don't generally practice that long all in one go - its split up throughout the day. But I generally cover:

Warm up/mess about with scales
chords/chord changes/strumming patterns/chord progressions
improv
whatever technique I'm focussing on
practice whatever song I'm doing for my lesson
practice 'band' songs (its more of a bandlet atm :P)
improv
write something based on whatever theory I learnt lately
more improv lol

I have a 3hr train ride to/from work twice a week too, and I generally use it to either write something or transcribe something.

As far as no social life goes - I am really antisocial in the week, as I'd rather go home and practice than go to the pub. Only time I'm really sociable in the week is jam sessions lol Weekends are different as there's time for both then
#25
Quote by deHufter
Not really, the no social life thing is for people who'd like do other stuff rather than practice guitar for 5 hours a day, and still play guitar after that in their 'free' time. Don't get me wrong, you should do whatever you want, but i dont bother spending so fricking much time in my life playing guitar ending up in a caféband earning a crate of beer and 200 bucks every week. like to play with my band once a week and have gigs once a couple of months so i dont practice or play more than 2 hours a day.
But everybody should do what he or she wants.
Well one of the reasons I practice so much is to keep up and get 'accepted' by the big jazz scene guys. Right now I play at least two gigs a week, get called to help record, and a few times a month get called to sit in on some burning established jazzers.
#26
Cant believe nobody recommended transcribing. Id say put a solid hour of transcribing solos. You learn sooooooo much. Might also want to put some time into sight reading.
#27
Most of the time, continuous exercise of technique or hard core theory learning is the best.

But i approach it by kind of screwing around on the guitar, like i play randomly, ****ing around with pedals, with feedback and just playing random ****. Sometimes when your doing this, a tune comes or you make a great lick, or even accidently figure out a melody to one of your favourite songs .

Of course the most practical approach is still shredding out exercises or what not, but i find ****ing around, or just jamming quite helpful
#28
Quote by PortgasDRoy7
Most of the time, continuous exercise of technique or hard core theory learning is the best.

But i approach it by kind of screwing around on the guitar, like i play randomly, ****ing around with pedals, with feedback and just playing random ****. Sometimes when your doing this, a tune comes or you make a great lick, or even accidently figure out a melody to one of your favourite songs .

Of course the most practical approach is still shredding out exercises or what not, but i find ****ing around, or just jamming quite helpful
As far as improving goes, do the opposite of this

For one, if you only practice one thing for a long period of time you will lose focus and not gain anything from your work.

Also, any teacher will tell you just messing around isn't going to get you anywhere and practicing a long time ever once in a while won't either.
First Figure out how much time you have on a regular basis (whether it be 30 minutes or a couple hours) and practice every day. Someone practicing every day for 30 minutes will get better so much faster than one who plays all day once a week.

Then make goals of where you want to be next week, next month, next year, and then one long term goal.

Finally structure your routine into basic categories that will help you achieve the goals you've set for yourself



#29
Try learning different types of techniques. Maybe finger picking, sweeping, hybrid picking, ect. Also try doing chromatics and stuff like 1-2-3-4 going up and down then left and right and stuff to get all your fingers going good and fast. Really helps on speed and clean playing.
#30
Here's my hypothetical practice schedule for about 3 hours every other day or so

Sightreading-usually just go through some tunes from a real book
Voice/ear training-singing the modes, singing arpeggios, singing while sightreading
Transcribing-pick a few jazz or whatever tunes before hand and notate the melodies or solos
Transposing-pick a realbook tune and change it's key
Lefthand exercise-scales, arpeggios, linear chord inversions all over the neck
Righthand exercise-PIMA work, flamenco techniques (Quintuplet tremolo, rasqueados), tapping arpeggios, artificial harmonics, picking
Rhythm training-odd meter and/or syncopation work, comping during a solo in a recording.
Jamming-either with selfmade grooves, my friends, or recordings

Then I do the transcribing, lefthand exercises, rhythm training and jamming on bass too.

That sir, is how you become a good musician.
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#31
a postitive role model to aspire to .
I remember reading the article in "guitar world" December 1999 with Steve vai ,
( i wonder if "guitar world " publish an article in December 2009, if they will dress Steve vai in playboy bunny ears .... ! )
anyway as a teenager the original article was really inspiring it steve vai talked about his long practice schedules , which gave me as a teenager , a postitive role model to aspire to .
one thing that is overlooked about this article was aside from the technical exercises which are well documented , steve vai also talked about the importance of meditation.
you can compare this with another interview with Joe satriani where he talks about his "Hendrix candle" a candle he lit placed in front of his eyes , he closed his eyes and focused on the inspiration Hendrix gave him .

what do you practice ?
what i am trying to say is we all practice 3 - 8 hours a day ,
we spend most , if not all our life practising .
the question is what do you practice ?
now the way i see it ,
the most obvious place is to pick up your guitar and learn a song you like , work on some scales ,listen to music ,perform some songs , maybe develop your theory and language .
this is great - but i think we can learn from farmers;they plant the seed ;but then they nurture it , at this stage it seems to an outsider that nothing is happening , but nurture is an important part of the process.
they know that this is the way the crop will be successful .
our goals in practising are similar .

music has a timeless magic to it , and sometimes to focus on this we need , to stay still .
be with ourselves ....
#32
Alright i've been playing for 15 years and now have taught guitar for 10 years and i never had a regime i just practiced what i wanted when i wanted. For me it make me burned out.

Im pretty obsessive though as a person so what i tend to do is laser focus on one thing for a month like solos then for a month theory. Its just the way i am, but eventually i get everything done. If you find it is becoming a chore just stop and come back to it. Its not a race (and anyway 10 hours fresh on the guitar a week are more valuable than 20 hours fed up).

Some time saving tips i could give...

1. DONT SIT FOR HOURS PLAYING WHAT YOU ARE ALREADY GOOD AT.

2. learn basic piano skills which saves so much time understanding theory

3. dont waste time pushing yourself with stuff too hard for you. its much better to play easier stuff well than to play hard stuff badly.
Last edited by Metallicker. at Aug 24, 2009,
#33
Quote by Metallicker.
Alright i've been playing for 15 years and now have taught guitar for 10 years and i never had a regime i just practiced what i wanted when i wanted. For me it make me burned out.

Im pretty obsessive though as a person so what i tend to do is laser focus on one thing for a month like solos then for a month theory. Its just the way i am, but eventually i get everything done. If you find it is becoming a chore just stop and come back to it. Its not a race (and anyway 10 hours fresh on the guitar a week are more valuable than 20 hours fed up).

Some time saving tips i could give...

1. DONT SIT FOR HOURS PLAYING WHAT YOU ARE ALREADY GOOD AT.

2. learn basic piano skills which saves so much time understanding theory

3. dont waste time pushing yourself with stuff too hard for you. its much better to play easier stuff well than to play hard stuff badly.


1) What if you really enjoy some of the music that you are already good it?

Playing music that you like, and are good enough at to enjoy is good thing IMO
To me that's the reward for all the work you've put in. If deny yourself that, then it's all work and no play....... not a healthy approach from my experience.

2) good tip

3) good tip

In general very good post, I just disagree with that one point.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 24, 2009,
#34
Quote by GuitarMunky
1) What if you really enjoy some of the music that you are already good it?

Playing music that you like, and are good enough at to enjoy is good thing IMO
To me that's the reward for all the work you've put in. If deny yourself that, then it's all work and no play....... not a healthy approach from my experience.



Well the thread is about practice regimes and i see the majority kids who just unconsciously jam riffs out etc when they think they are 'putting in 8 hours a day'. Its great to play stuff you know but you are not learning anything new. They think they are putting in 8 hours a day when in fact they are jamming for 90% of the time and will eventually get burned out.
#35
Quote by Metallicker.
Well the thread is about practice regimes and i see the majority kids who just unconsciously jam riffs out etc when they think they are 'putting in 8 hours a day'. Its great to play stuff you know but you are not learning anything new. They think they are putting in 8 hours a day when in fact they are jamming for 90% of the time and will eventually get burned out.


Yeah, I understand your point. I think it is possible to overdo things, especially scale and technique practice. Still, time spent enjoying the instrument can only be a good thing.

Anyway, good tips man.
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#36
^ +1 playing the stuff i was already good at was the fun part of putting up with teaching myself stuff. i'd practice something i sucked at for a little while, then i'd play something fun to reward myself. eventually the stuff i was practicing to get better at became the stuff that was fun.
#37
i would say break up your routine throughout the day (with proper warm-ups), but also I gotta ask (and to be honest I haven't read through the entire thread), are we counting noodling in the 8 hours? or is it a real 8 hours? b/c i dunno about you guys, but i can't sit around running scales and crap for that long without getting board and taking a little stroll down to wankersville.
#38
Is there anyone on these forums who actually puts in a "true" solid 8 hours or more of practise each day? I really would like to hear what they say and how they structure their routines

I myself just try to have fun and challenge myself each time I pick up the instrument.
The amount of time spent isn't the emphasis, just feeling accomplished and satisfied is AND again, of course, having fun. Isn't that the whole point?
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#39
Quote by JRex
Is there anyone on these forums who actually puts in a "true" solid 8 hours or more of practise each day? I really would like to hear what they say and how they structure their routines

I myself just try to have fun and challenge myself each time I pick up the instrument.
The amount of time spent isn't the emphasis, just feeling accomplished and satisfied is AND again, of course, having fun. Isn't that the whole point?


I put in a solid eight hours every day on my trumpet practice for college. Guitar shouldn't really be any different. Practicing new pieces, perfecting old ones, theory, rhythm studies, good warm-ups, etc.
#40
when i teach , i teach sometimes over 8 hours a day , i dont play all that time , but there are days , by the end of it my fingertips are numb .
ive been playing guitar for just under 20 years , but even now after what is a 9-5 of guitar, my fingertips are knackered .
the last gig i played was a wedding , i did 3 hours non stop there, i wont lie to you by the end i was sick of the guitar , and i must say i normally love playing .
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