#1
How can I find out whether my system is able to run 64-bit OS, i'm going to get Windows 7 64-bit so it would be handy to know
Manchester United
#3
Start> Right click Computer > Properties
In system, it will say system type. 64 or 32bit.

Next time use the computer thread.
#4
Quote by Gaz_m2k5
Start> Right click Computer > Properties
In system, it will say system type. 64 or 32bit.

Next time use the computer thread.


I am running 32 bit now i already know this, i wanted to know whether i can run 64 bit

I have 4GB of DDR2 ram and the Asus P5QC motherboard
Manchester United
#5
Quote by Shabalaba
I am running 32 bit now i already know this, i wanted to know whether i can run 64 bit

I have 4GB of DDR2 ram and the Asus P5QC motherboard



should be fine man i run similar specs and run xp64 very nicely. the only issue (and it was a pain in the butt was DAW music recording software that wasnt compatable including hundreds of dollars of plugins.
Last edited by Serg1 at Aug 22, 2009,
#6
Depends on your processor
Make sure you do lots of research on 64 bit before you commit
Currently most software and drivers are written for 32 bit so you need to decide what you want the computer to do and make sure 64 bit is compatable with that.
Last edited by Frankie_Stone at Aug 22, 2009,
#7
Quote by Gaz_m2k5
Start> Right click Computer > Properties
In system, it will say system type. 64 or 32bit.

Next time use the computer thread.


No, I think that only tells you whether the current OS is 64 bit or not. Actual 64 bit capability is dependent entirely on CPU architecture I think.
#8
Depends what processor you have, right click on my computer and select properties. Google your processor type to find out. Pretty much any dual core will most likely be 64bit. Plus you will be able to access all of your ram with 64 bit.
#9
Intel Core Duo E8500 @ 3.16 (2 CPUs)

EDIT:
Quote by Frankie_Stone
Depends on your processor
Make sure you do lots of research on 64 bit before you commit
Currently most software and drivers are written for 32 bit so you need to decide what you want the computer to do and make sure 64 bit is compatable with that.


I did think about that, I did some research but it was pretty 50/50. Some were saying you should wait a while before updating because 32 is the best at the moment but others were saying you should get 64 bit because it is the future and has sufficient amount of drivers and software out
Manchester United
Last edited by Shabalaba at Aug 22, 2009,
#11
Quote by Shabalaba
Intel Core Duo E8500 @ 3.16 (2 CPUs)


Intel Site says all their Core 2 Duo products (with that on the list) support 64 bit systems, you're good to go.
#13
Quote by Shabalaba
Thanks

But would you advice it or not?


I switched from XP to Vista 64 on my computer so I couldn't really tell the difference, but my neighbour went from XP to XP64 and there quite a noticeable difference in speed
#14
Quote by Shabalaba
Thanks

But would you advice it or not?


Yeah, I would. Everything seems to run much faster and more smoothly.
#16
While we're discussing it... What about a single core processor? 32 bit only?
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#17
You will most likely encounter problems with drivers and/or programs. The main weakness of a 64-bit system, is compatibility. A lot of legacy software will not work, and there might not be drivers for certain devices. All new CPU's and GFX-cards have drivers for 64-bit systems, but things such as external sound cards, recording software, printers etc. might not be supported. Other than that, I recommend it. Unless you plan on playing 15 year old games all day, you should typically get everything to work. You can make use of more ram, and your CPU will have an increased performance. 64 bit is the future, as applications get bigger and bigger. 3gb of ram just won't be enough in a few years.

Installation is usually the biggest problem. Getting everything up and running could take some more time. For instance, certain combinations of hardware would cause Vista 64 to bluescreen if it was booted with more than 3 gigabytes of ram. The solution was installing Vista with 2gb, then installing Service Pack 1, and then insert the extra ram.

Wrong forum, though.