#1
My mom knocked it over while she was hoovering.Whats the verdict? Is it worth taking it to my local guitar shop?


Below is a link to the guitar
http://www.ibanez.co.jp/world/product_news/pages/2007/MESSE_TALMAN/TCY20072.html

had to use the web cam on my lap top to take the picture so the quality is a bit crap.
Attachments:
Broken Headstock.jpg
Last edited by qwertz17 at Aug 22, 2009,
#2
Looks like a very very clean break.
Just put wood glue in and clamp it back up. After a day of the clamp, it should be fine.
#4
Quote by Baby Joel
Looks like a very very clean break.
Just put wood glue in and clamp it back up. After a day of the clamp, it should be fine.

Yeah.

Use Tightbond original, and Make sure you get the whole break.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#5
Shoot your mom.

If my mom knocked over my Ltd, I'd demand a new guitar.
RIP Tom Searle.
#6
Thanks, I've never repaired any of my guitars myself before but you guys make it sound so simple so I'll give it a whack.
#7
Quote by oneblackened
Yeah.

Use Tightbond original, and Make sure you get the whole break.



Not arguing with you but I would like to know why you would suggest Titebond over epoxy. Benefit to Titebond is that it would flow easier. However, I believe epoxy is the only glue that is able to "fill" gaps and provide strength. Once the Titebond glue line obtains any thickness, it is prone to breaking.
#8
In any woodworking case, the benefit of Titebond is that it sets faster and is able to change slightly with the swelling and contracting of wood over the seasons, iirc.

Also, TS, check this video out: http://www.youtube.com/user/emilyguitar2#play/all/uploads-all/0/H41stfp-NVQ

It's on an Epi LP, but the concepts the same.
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#9
Quote by Rusty_Chisel
Not arguing with you but I would like to know why you would suggest Titebond over epoxy. Benefit to Titebond is that it would flow easier. However, I believe epoxy is the only glue that is able to "fill" gaps and provide strength. Once the Titebond glue line obtains any thickness, it is prone to breaking.
ALL adhesives including epoxy are WEAK if they have any thickness. The object is to have an extremely thin layer of adhesive and intimate contact between the wood surfaces. Not to "fill gaps".

Titebond will absorb into the pores of the wood. Epoxy will not.
Titebond will flow easily without air bubbles. Epoxy will not.
Titebond can be squeezed out into an extremely thin layer by clamping. More so than epoxy.


qwertz17
Here's a thread about repairing a broken headstock with pics and a link to a video:
Broken Headstock - Epi Les Paul [PICS]
You can learn a bit from that.


Meadows
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#11
Quote by PTModIT
Check out this video.Perfect for your situation. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-afN6Q9Y1A&feature=related.
Very nice. Personally, I'd be in favor of completing the break to get better access when applying the glue. But a syringe is not a bad idea at all.
Meadows
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#12
Quote by Rusty_Chisel
Not arguing with you but I would like to know why you would suggest Titebond over epoxy. Benefit to Titebond is that it would flow easier. However, I believe epoxy is the only glue that is able to "fill" gaps and provide strength. Once the Titebond glue line obtains any thickness, it is prone to breaking.

Yeah, no.
Titebond is meant for strong joints, and as said earlier, the thinner the adhesive layer, the better.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400 with Gotoh GE1996T (EMG 85/60)
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
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Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#13
Ok, Idk how much you know about repairing or wood work, but if you aren't experienced, I expect you're probably nervous and not sure about fixing this yourself, but believe me, this is an easy fix ;]
All of these tips and links might be too much too fast, so no worries, I'll break it down for you :]
What to do:
1. Remove the strings and tuners. this can usually be done with a couple screwdrivers and maybe a wrench or two. The trussrod cover might get in the way later so it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to take that off aswell.

2. If the headstock is still attached by some wood(in other words, it hasn't broken completely off) you may have to break it off the rest of the way in order to glue it properly, however this isn't always necessary, so when in doubt, post some more pics and we'll be happy to help you in any way we can ;]

3. Find your wood glue. Lots of ppl like different brands, some have already been mentioned...

4. Glue the damaged area. You'll want to apply a thin layer of glue over the entire area inside the crack, it doesn't need to be thickly poured on, the excess will seep out later anyway. Make sure that you are thorough and cover the whole inside of the crack, so that it will be a strong repair job ;]

5. Clamp the headstock back together. Make sure you have the pieces of the guitar lined up as they should be. It would be wise to put a rag under each foot of the clamp/clamps (the parts that touch the guitar). This will protect your finish, at least slightly. as you tighten the clamp/clamps, excess glue will seep out the edges of the cracks. A damp rag can be used to wipe that away nicely.
DO NOT TIGHTEN THE CLAMPS AS TIGHT AS YOU CAN!
That will just crack the head worse XD so tighten them snugly, and it should be fine.

6. Wait a full day before removing the clamp/clamps. You want to give that glue time to dry ;]
I would wait a full week before stringing it up again, but it isn't necessary to wait that long, and I'm cautious XD

7. Reassemble the guitar. Put ur tuners, trussrod cover, and strings back on, and try it out. With any luck you'll have done a great repair and your guitar will be good as new...except a slightly visible crack line

Hope that helps, I'm by no means an experienced luthier (wood working person), but this is a simple and easy fix that will probably cost less than $20 and is certainly better than buying a new guitar :]

If anyone noticed a mistake, or has a better way to do this, please feel free to correct me. I am, by all means, not an expert XD
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#14
Quote by Shaggy Shadric
Ok, Idk how much you know about repairing or wood work, but if you aren't experienced, I expect you're probably nervous and not sure about fixing this yourself, but believe me, this is an easy fix ;]
All of these tips and links might be too much too fast, so no worries, I'll break it down for you :]
What to do:
1. Remove the strings and tuners. this can usually be done with a couple screwdrivers and maybe a wrench or two. The trussrod cover might get in the way later so it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to take that off aswell.

2. If the headstock is still attached by some wood(in other words, it hasn't broken completely off) you may have to break it off the rest of the way in order to glue it properly, however this isn't always necessary, so when in doubt, post some more pics and we'll be happy to help you in any way we can ;]

3. Find your wood glue. Lots of ppl like different brands, some have already been mentioned...

4. Glue the damaged area. You'll want to apply a thin layer of glue over the entire area inside the crack, it doesn't need to be thickly poured on, the excess will seep out later anyway. Make sure that you are thorough and cover the whole inside of the crack, so that it will be a strong repair job ;]

5. Clamp the headstock back together. Make sure you have the pieces of the guitar lined up as they should be. It would be wise to put a rag under each foot of the clamp/clamps (the parts that touch the guitar). This will protect your finish, at least slightly. as you tighten the clamp/clamps, excess glue will seep out the edges of the cracks. A damp rag can be used to wipe that away nicely.
DO NOT TIGHTEN THE CLAMPS AS TIGHT AS YOU CAN!
That will just crack the head worse XD so tighten them snugly, and it should be fine.

6. Wait a full day before removing the clamp/clamps. You want to give that glue time to dry ;]
I would wait a full week before stringing it up again, but it isn't necessary to wait that long, and I'm cautious XD

7. Reassemble the guitar. Put ur tuners, trussrod cover, and strings back on, and try it out. With any luck you'll have done a great repair and your guitar will be good as new...except a slightly visible crack line

Hope that helps, I'm by no means an experienced luthier (wood working person), but this is a simple and easy fix that will probably cost less than $20 and is certainly better than buying a new guitar :]

If anyone noticed a mistake, or has a better way to do this, please feel free to correct me. I am, by all means, not an expert XD
Looks good, Tim. The only thing I have to comment on is step 5. You are correct that if he clamps it too hard it can indent or even crack the wood, but he has to make sure he clamps it hard enough that he gets a good glue joint. For an unexperienced woodworker working on fragile parts, finding this balance can be difficult, but this break appears to be a very good break. it's a clean break, and it appears to be broken such that clamping will be easy, as the headstock is flat. (Clamping on the back of the neck where it's round can get difficult)

Also, I recommend not breaking the headstock off the rest of the way. This break appears to be such that you can get glue all the way into it without breaking it off the rest of the way. And, if you don't break it off the rest of the way, the remaining wood will keep the pieces from moving around a little when you clamp it, and you will get a nice, perfectly aligned joint.

And make sure you clean up the excess glue that squeezes out of the crack while it's still wet, as it's essentially permanent once it dries.
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#15
man if my mom broke my guitar like that. the consequences would be dire.
Classical Guitarist
#16
I know this is an old bump, how did you get on in the end?

My mum done the same to my Epi LP Standard! Exactly the same break too.
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Nevermind.........
#17
Check out those videos that have been posted. They'll describe exactly how to fix the headstock
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A man chooses, a slave obeys.
#18
back in 95ish I was in the northridge earthquack in ca.... my half stack fell on two of my guitfiddles...
one was a hamer steve stevens and one was a gibson sg jr...

my hamer was literally splintered into thousands of pieces... I took some GOOD QUALITY wood glue and an air hose... held guitar upside down while I dripped wood glue into the splintered headstock... used the air hose to blow glue as far up in there as possible... then clamped the piss out of it...
been using that guitar ever since.

make certain you get glue all the way up in there... might even be better to spread the hole or even finish the break cause if there is a dry spot it may rattle later on or even break in a new direction...

just my humble opinion.

oh and interesting fact I learned as a woodworker - the wood glued area will actually be stronger than the original wood assuming it was a good fix...
so you've managed to strengthen your guitar!
Last edited by mistermikev at Sep 13, 2009,
#19
Quote by mistermikev

make certain you get glue all the way up in there... might even be better to spread the hole or even finish the break cause if there is a dry spot it may rattle later on or even break in a new direction...

Quoted the most important part of that statement.
R.I.P. Les Paul, 1915-2009

A man chooses, a slave obeys.