#1
Hi,
I am receiving classical guitar classes weekly since just a month.
I like very much but I would like to start playing "blues" and "jazz".
My teacher only teaches classical.
So I would like to practice at home with these other styles.
Could anybody recommend me methods and scores for absolute beginners?
Off course starting with blues or jazz.
Thank you very much.
Regards.
#2
Essentially, you could purchase books which contain any jazz standard. Quickly enough, you'll see the sort of chords you need to learn (7ths, 13ths, etcetcetc).

You'll need to learn how to improvise (amongst other things), and any jazz instructional book should give a little insight into such things.
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#3
I'd stick with what your teacher's giving you for maybe 3 or 4 months first. Things start to come easier after a bit longer, right now you'll overload yourself if you try to learn 2 styles at once.
#5
You're one step ahead of the game, kid. Y'should keep doing the classical guitar thing and see how far that gets you since a lot of good playing habits should carry over from that into other genres.

But if you want to play blues and jazz right away anyway, you should scour the internet for available theory on chord structures and rhythm. It's going to be a while before you can get the kind of stamina or focus to play lead guitar (assuming that's what you want to do when playing blues/jazz) so you might as well spend the time learning other practical skills.
Last edited by HoffManCometh at Aug 23, 2009,
#6
Quote by Iriathz
Essentially, you could purchase books which contain any jazz standard. Quickly enough, you'll see the sort of chords you need to learn (7ths, 13ths, etcetcetc).

You'll need to learn how to improvise (amongst other things), and any jazz instructional book should give a little insight into such things.


What do you think about Levine books?
#7
Quote by tom1thomas1
I'd stick with what your teacher's giving you for maybe 3 or 4 months first. Things start to come easier after a bit longer, right now you'll overload yourself if you try to learn 2 styles at once.


I agree.
I am looking for information but probably I won´t start blues and jazz until 3 or 4 months.
But I would like to start preparing jazz theory.
What do you think?
#8
If you want books, I really like John Ganapes books...



Are Ganapes books for absolute beginners?
#9
Quote by HoffManCometh
You're one head step ahead of the game, kid. Y'should keep doing the classical guitar thing and see how far that gets you since a lot of good playing habits should carry over from that into other genres.


I agree.
I would like to take classical habits (posture, fingerstyle, ....) I like very much the classes, but I feel that jazz is the music I would like to play.


Quote by HoffManCometh
But if you want to play blues and jazz right away anyway, you should scour the internet for available theory on chord structures and rhythm. It's going to be a while before you can get the kind of stamina or focus to play lead guitar (assuming that's what you want to do when playing blues/jazz) so you might as well spend the time learning other practical skills.


Internet problem is to select. There ae a lot of information but sometimes, for beginners, It´s difficult to select the best if you are starting a matter.
Thanks a lot for your response.
Last edited by Aceituna at Aug 23, 2009,
#10
Quote by Aceituna
Are Ganapes books for absolute beginners?


I wouldn't say they are for complete beginners. I'd say they are for someone between a beginner and intermediate. The Blues book will definitely improve your knowledge of blues and how to play over a blues progression. The Jazz book isn't as difficult on the technical aspects of playing, but it's heavily focused on theory and how to play over jazz progressions.
#11
What do you think about Levine books?


Far too complicated for a beginner atm. If you don't know some knowledge of theory already that book will be too complicated.


I'd start off with blues, rather than jazz. It's easier. Pick up a few records and get listening, try to play along with them, that's how the greats learned. Once you get a few things under your finger if you start to learn the theory behind it you'll really be a step ahead of the game.


I like your user name, Olive.
#12
Quote by Confusius
Far too complicated for a beginner atm. If you don't know some knowledge of theory already that book will be too complicated.


I agree. I have the book. It´s very interesting.
I am learning harmony with Spanish books for starting later Levine book.
I have read good comments about it.


Quote by Confusius
I'd start off with blues, rather than jazz. It's easier. Pick up a few records and get listening, try to play along with them, that's how the greats learned. Once you get a few things under your finger if you start to learn the theory behind it you'll really be a step ahead of the game.


I think to start with blues too. At the momment, I am only receiveing classical lessons, but in three or four months, I am looking for a good jazz and blues teacher for taking weekly classes. Off course keeping my classical learning.


Quote by Confusius
I like your user name, Olive.


I am from Spain. Do you speak Spanish?
#17
Quote by Aceituna
Sorry, what does "hollow built" mind?
And "semi hollow"?


Semi-Hollow guitars are types of electric guitars with a sound box in addition to pickups. Essentially you have an electric guitar with a little bit of acoustic capabilities. A well known example of this is the Gibson ES-335 or the Gretsch 6120 "Chet Atkins."

For starting off with the blues, you might try these two sites:

www.12bar.de

www.bluesforpeace.com
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King