#1
i want to make an investment in a guitar. to keep, and barely use. preferablly a gibson. i dont wanna spend much more then 2500. any ideas what kind of guitar would increase the most in price after many years? opinions?
Gear:

Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany

Epiphone Les Paul Goldtop with Seymour Duncan Alnico II's

Seagull 25th anniversary Mahogany Edition

Crate GT65

Digitech Metal Master

Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#3
If you are going for a Gibson and want it more to just collect than to play, you might want to look into some of their Limited Production models and see what they offer. While it's hard to know what is going to be valuable in the future, stuff that is in limited production will probably be able to fetch a greater price.

Chances are that after a model is long past production, a guitarist is going to want to purchase one.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#4
Possibly a JEM.

Thats $2,499.99 =P

But Gibson guitars aren't too much of an investment considering their quality has pretty much dive-bombed over the years. But more recently the past 5 years.
#5
Quote by Xeron Brigs
If you are going for a Gibson and want it more to just collect than to play, you might want to look into some of their Limited Production models and see what they offer. While it's hard to know what is going to be valuable in the future, stuff that is in limited production will probably be able to fetch a greater price.

Chances are that after a model is long past production, a guitarist is going to want to purchase one.


Gibson limited productions run for far more than 2500$.
#7
Quote by captainoid
Why a Gibson?


because gibsons are the only guitars i feel i would spend alot of money on. they feel right. i dont know why. their just classy
Gear:

Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany

Epiphone Les Paul Goldtop with Seymour Duncan Alnico II's

Seagull 25th anniversary Mahogany Edition

Crate GT65

Digitech Metal Master

Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#8
Quote by captainoid
Gibson limited productions run for far more than 2500$.


You never know. I managed to shave $700 off the MSRP price for my most recent purchase. Plus, you can always buy them used.

Just beware of fakes, the market is rampart with them.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
Last edited by Xeron Brigs at Aug 23, 2009,
#10
I'll be honest; those two eBay links you posted seem kind of shady.

Not only have I never seen either models, but the seller is not an authorized dealer and they aren't showing a clear picture of the headstock, which is a common way to identify fakes.

I'm not say that they are definitely fakes, but they certainly raise a red flag. What you might do is ask for the serial number and then call Gibson customer support about it.
"Notes are expensive, spend them wisely." - B.B. King
#11
they give you serial numbers before you make any payments.
Gear:

Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany

Epiphone Les Paul Goldtop with Seymour Duncan Alnico II's

Seagull 25th anniversary Mahogany Edition

Crate GT65

Digitech Metal Master

Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#12
Once you get your gibson try and get a world famous artist to sign it, imagine how much signed les paul guitars will be in a few years, or a guitar signed by randy rhoads, kurt cobain or jimi hendrix is worth.
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#13
Quote by JAHellraiser
Once you get your gibson try and get a world famous artist to sign it, imagine how much signed les paul guitars will be in a few years, or a guitar signed by randy rhoads, kurt cobain or jimi hendrix is worth.


.

Oh no you didn't!
#14
im thinking les paul of some sort.
Gear:

Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany

Epiphone Les Paul Goldtop with Seymour Duncan Alnico II's

Seagull 25th anniversary Mahogany Edition

Crate GT65

Digitech Metal Master

Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#15
This is a really terrible idea.

Firstly, if you're looking at investing in something then putting a price bracket on it is stupid.
Secondly, there aren't currently any models worth investing in. LE models are wildcards, they could increase in value dramatically or they could become worthless. Look at some of the rarer LP and SG models that Gibson made in the 60's and 70's, they're worth ****-all now while a basic, standard LP from 1958 is worth a small fortune. Which makes you think the best thing to buy as an investment would be a normal Les Paul Standard, but the Standards have done nothing but depreciate in value for years now, and especially the current Standards, which are pretty oddball themselves, probably won't ever reach the dizzy prices that 50's and 60's Gibsons do.
Then there's the simply fact that for the first twenty years, you'll only be losing money. Then, if you're lucky and somehow people in twenty years decide that 00's guitars were alright, you might get your money back (just like 70's and 80's Gibsons right now are worth roughly what they were new - a mid-70's Les Paul Goldtop in top condition is only worth about £1850, which is the same as a new LP Standard). Then in thirty to forty years time, if you're lucky, you might make profit, but who knows how much.

Buying any guitar as an investment is very, very silly, and a poor use of money. It's a huge gamble that probably won't pay off, it'll be decades before you get to see just how much money you lose, and of all the things to throw money away on, a guitar isn't the best choice.


If you really were hell-bent on investing on a guitar, you'd need to spend a lot more money and you'd need to buy something that you know for sure is only going to grow in value - you can pick up a 50's Strat in decent condition for about £20,000, depending on spec and the exact year, and that will only increase in value. To put this in perspective for Gibson, a 1976 Firebird in mint condition is currently sitting in a shop here for £5000 (about $9000) - and the store owners who happen to be the main dealers of vintage guitars in the UK, do not know for usre if it will ever be worth any more than that. And that's just a 70's Firebird - you'd be paying even more for an earlier Les Paul or SG that stands any chance of gaining value.
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#16
^ +1

Any vintage guitar that isn't already worth a lot may very well stay that way. The market for vintage guitars is rather unpredictable, and relies on who is buying, what they want to buy, and how bad they want to buy it.
#17
You're not getting anything "investable" for $2500 - all you're getting is a nice mass-produced instrument that'll depriciate same as anything else.
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#18
Quote by captainoid
Gibson limited productions run for far more than 2500$.

I bought my 1999 40th for $2400 recently. I expect that to hold its value for awhile at least.

Granted that is $1100 below book in the Vintage Guide, but occasionally you can find a good deal.
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#19
i'm anti-investment.

it's a waste of money to buy a gibson just to store it away and hope to make more money from it later. it's wasteful, greedy and just plain stupid.

my advice to you would be either spend the money on something worthwhile, or simply save the money for later. the modern gibsons i'm afraid are probably going to be thrown into the norlin bin in later years. vintage norlin era gibsons go for a little less than a brand new equivalent. though mathematically they've appreciated in value, when you take inflation into account, they've actually depreciated.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

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#20
Buy stock in gibson lol, Dont know if u actually can or not....

I guess you need to ask yourself do you really want to deprive yourself of playing a Gibson for the next 30 years or so. 30 years might be exaggerating a bit but its gonna take a while for it to become vintage and worth money. The guitar you buy now might not even become a 'collectors item'. You will have to find a model which is in limited production.

Its also important to consider the concept of 'time value of money'. This means that you can buy the gibson for $2,500 today and sell it in 10 years for $25,000. But if you go to a music shop in 10 years time they might be selling equivalent brand new gibson models for $25,000. Essentially your 10 year old gibson is worth the same amount as a new gibson so effectively you dont make any money if you sell it. Again exagerated figures.

Theres some food for thought, sorry if i confused or bored you.

I think the only reason to invest in a gibson is because you want to get endless hours of enjoyment out of it.
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#21
Quote by Tatsumaru
I think the only reason to invest in a gibson is because you want to get endless hours of enjoyment out of it.

this is my point really.

and buying something with no intention other than to sell it for more money later on deprives the decent people who just wanna make music of these instruments, of the good instruments - the reason vintage guitars are so expensive is because most of them have been hoarded by collectors who hardly play guitar, and simply store them away and wait for the value to go up, sell to another collector who'll do the same - it's pushed some of the best guitars beyond the reach of anyone who wants something to play, and enjoy, rather than make money from, which is a real shame.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#22
+1 On what McFibble and Blompcube said. Quality has really gone down the drain for Gibson in recent years so I doubt many people are going to want a 2000s Gibson Les Paul as a player.

If you aren't quite satisfied with the replies here ask about this at The Gear Page. http://www.thegearpage.net/board/index.php
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#23
First off, I wouldn't buy anything new. Second, for something pristine I would spend a lot more.

The only thing I would consider doing that with would be the limited signiture model Rickenbackers - as they have all been made in small numbers and have gone up over the years.
#25
Don't invest in electric guitars if your not planning on getting the enjoyment of playing out of it.

If you want money from investment, buy stock.
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#26
After reading a bit through this thread, I'm not sure investing in that 1971/1972 Deluxe Goldtop a couple of months back was such a great idea. I mean, I play the thing often, but my intentions were definitely impure and it probably won't jump in value beyond the $3200 I paid for it. :S
#27
I own an explorer and I love it to death, but I wouldn't recommend a Gibson.

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#28
i want an explorer! badly.
Gear:

Gibson Les Paul Vintage Mahogany

Epiphone Les Paul Goldtop with Seymour Duncan Alnico II's

Seagull 25th anniversary Mahogany Edition

Crate GT65

Digitech Metal Master

Dunlop Original Crybaby Wah
#29
Quote by r0ckth3d34n
Possibly a JEM.

Thats $2,499.99 =P

But Gibson guitars aren't too much of an investment considering their quality has pretty much dive-bombed over the years. But more recently the past 5 years.
Uh... no that's not how it works. Gibsons made during the '90s are actually very high in quality, and in general, superior to the wide majority of guitars made in the '70s through the '80s, and yet those are not increasing in value, one can find a les paul standard from the early '90s for ~$1500 if they look hard enough, and one can find historics from the later '90s for under $3000. And "recent years"? That also has not kept models like the 2005 CA Page model from skyrocketing in value, and I assure you that if there was a CA Page that played like hell, and sounded like a dead log, one could still sell it for twice it's original price.

I will say this to the TS as well, a $2400 Gibson bought new today will not increase in value. Why? 1. They're not that great, 2. they make a ton of them. Same reason why no one cares much about Norlin era Gibsons, which disregarding inflation, have basically not gained any value at all.
Last edited by al112987 at Aug 23, 2009,
#30
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#31
IMO, the only guitar worth investing in is Ibanez. They are one of the very very few companies that puts out a sought after and highly limited guitar on a yearly basis. Look at the RG550XXDY or RFR. Those models have already increased in value about 40%. The Limited satch, Vai and Gilbert models are a smart investment as well.
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#32
Quote by MrFlibble
This is a really terrible idea.

Firstly, if you're looking at investing in something then putting a price bracket on it is stupid.
/sensible rant.

This guy hopefully warned you off of the horrible idea you've got. Buying a guitar not to play it is like buying soda not to drink it: against the whole idea of the guitar. If you're going to spend that much money, put it toward something you'll use, or a house payment, or something for your car, or... A DATE! (or something for your wife if you've got previous obligations)
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