#1
^so yeah
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#3
a lot of iron maiden songs, dont remember which ones right now..
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#5
Quote by Aramoni
a lot of iron maiden songs, dont remember which ones right now..


This. The Trooper comes to mind, especially. Powerslave may be too, not sure about that one, though. Hallowed Be Thy Name is, too- but the intro is in Harmonic E Minor.

I'm curious, though, why do you want to know, OP?
#8
Well, E minor is a mode of G, so I'd say it counts- same notes and all.

Also what issac said- G major and G minor are totally different things, which do you want?
#9
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
Well, E minor is a mode of G, so I'd say it counts- same notes and all.

Also what issac said- G major and G minor are totally different things, which do you want?


No. Modes have nothing to do with anything here.
#10
G major
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#11
Practically every metal song is in the key of a low open string, like E, D or whatever else people down-tune to.
#12
Quote by timeconsumer09
No. Modes have nothing to do with anything here.


Why not? This is metal and all, so pure G major's going to be hard to find.

But I'm definitely no authority on this, so explain away
#13
If modes have nothing to do with it then good luck.

It's hard to find metal that's in a major scale.

Even most rock music is in minor scales because the major scale can generally just sound too "mary had a little lamb".
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#14
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
Well, E minor is a mode of G, so I'd say it counts- same notes and all.

Also what issac said- G major and G minor are totally different things, which do you want?


E minor is not a mode of G major. They are two completely different things, which happen to share the same notes, and are thus relative. Neither E minor or G major are modes.

Quote by windowmaker
If modes have nothing to do with it then good luck.

It's hard to find metal that's in a major scale.

Even most rock music is in minor scales because the major scale can generally just sound too "mary had a little lamb".


There is some metal that can sound very "happy". Check out this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AipaLbKnFPA 2:26 - 2:42
#15
Quote by isaac_bandits
E minor is not a mode of G major. They are two completely different things, which happen to share the same notes, and are thus relative. Neither E minor or G major are modes.


Wait, now I'm confused. I thought that E minor was the Aeolian mode of G major and that G major was it's own Ionian mode?
#16
Quote by GuerillaGorilla
Wait, now I'm confused. I thought that E minor was the Aeolian mode of G major and that G major was it's own Ionian mode?


E minor and G major are tonal. E aeolian and G ionian are modal. If you play the scales, E minor and aeolian will be identical, and G major and ionian will be identical, but when a song is in E minor it will be different from E aeolian, and likewise with G major and G ionian. If you want to know further look up the modes sticky, which should explain to you the differences between tonal and modal music.
#17
Quote by isaac_bandits
E minor is not a mode of G major. They are two completely different things, which happen to share the same notes, and are thus relative. Neither E minor or G major are modes.


What? Of course they are modes. Unless you are trying to argue some kind of stupid "aeolian vs minor" thing.

But to the other guy, just because something might be a mode of something else does not mean it has any real functional relation to it.
#18
Quote by isaac_bandits
E minor and G major are tonal. E aeolian and G ionian are modal. If you play the scales, E minor and aeolian will be identical, and G major and ionian will be identical, but when a song is in E minor it will be different from E aeolian, and likewise with G major and G ionian. If you want to know further look up the modes sticky, which should explain to you the differences between tonal and modal music.


Huh. I'm going to have to do researching now, since I never knew there was any difference in how Minor and Aeolian worked progression-wise. Just when you think you understand something...

And sorry for accidentally derailing this into a mode discussion... I know how tired the UG community is of modes talk here.
#19
Quote by Flobbey
What? Of course they are modes. Unless you are trying to argue some kind of stupid "aeolian vs minor" thing.

But to the other guy, just because something might be a mode of something else does not mean it has any real functional relation to it.


Aeolian and minor are different. Read the modes sticky to learn about modal music. Look almost anywhere else to learn about tonal music.
#20
Marty Friedman's solos in Holy Wars are in G major and G minor, and his solo in Foreclosure of a Dream switches between G Mixo and minor. Metal in a major key is difficult to find, maybe some power metal is though...
#21
Quote by isaac_bandits
Aeolian and minor are different. Read the modes sticky to learn about modal music. Look almost anywhere else to learn about tonal music.


I know all of that, and there isn't a difference. Calling them such is pedantic and only confuses people. The "modal music" is a term pretty much only used in a historical context, today the difference is described as static vs. tonal harmony, which concerns the harmonic background and not the scales themselves. They are the same, and only an annoying nerd would ever play up the supposed distinction between the two.
#22
Quote by Flobbey
I know all of that, and there isn't a difference. Calling them such is pedantic and only confuses people. The "modal music" is a term pretty much only used in a historical context, today the difference is described as static vs. tonal harmony, which concerns the harmonic background and not the scales themselves. They are the same, and only an annoying nerd would ever play up the supposed distinction between the two.


I was never arguing that the scales are different. I know that they are the same. But, considering that the thread is about songs in G, he is asking about the key of the song, not the scale used. As you said yourself the difference between the two is the harmony, and the harmony also dictates what key a song is in. Thus the difference between the two is important in this discussion.
#23
why specifically g major - you trying to run a few songs together? you trying to fit your vocal range better? is Em an acceptable alternative?

not quite metal but Knockin on heavens door by GnR is PLAYED in G major, except for the fact that's g relative to the annoying 1/2 step down tuning GnR use

for Em try war pigs - black sabbath
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#24
Well, E minor is a mode of G

If modes have nothing to do with it then good luck. It's hard to find metal that's in a major scale.

They are the same, and only an annoying nerd would ever play up the supposed distinction between the two.



They are not the same at all. You can't play E minor in G major, it just doesn't work. You won't be able to resolve. They have the same notes, but they are not the same
#25
Quote by KillahSquirrel


They are not the same at all. You can't play E minor in G major, it just doesn't work. You won't be able to resolve. They have the same notes, but they are not the same


I was saying that aeolian and minor are the same, brush up on your reading skills boy
#26
Quote by isaac_bandits
I was never arguing that the scales are different. I know that they are the same. But, considering that the thread is about songs in G, he is asking about the key of the song, not the scale used. As you said yourself the difference between the two is the harmony, and the harmony also dictates what key a song is in. Thus the difference between the two is important in this discussion.


I guess there was a misunderstanding, but I was responding to "Aeolian and minor are different.".
#27
To help teh confusion:

E minor IS a mode of G major, but just because something is a mode of something else doesn't really mean much outside of a derivation. Functionally they are completely different keys and in no way can be considered "the same". The other thing was a boring argument about naming conventions.
#28
Quote by Flobbey
I guess there was a misunderstanding, but I was responding to "Aeolian and minor are different.".


And my assumption based on the omission of the word 'scale' and the ambiguity as to which minor scale was being talked about, was that we were talking about keys not scales.
#29
I was saying that aeolian and minor are the same, brush up on your reading skills boy


What you originally said:

What? Of course they are modes. Unless you are trying to argue some kind of stupid "aeolian vs minor" thing. But to the other guy, just because something might be a mode of something else does not mean it has any real functional relation to it.


You were trying to say E minor is a mode of G major, which is just the wrong way of thinking of them
#30
Quote by KillahSquirrel
What you originally said:



You were trying to say E minor is a mode of G major, which is just the wrong way of thinking of them


Its a fine way of thinking of them, E minor (E aeolian) IS a mode of G major. Go ahead now and tell that aeolian and minor are so different and I mustn't confuse the two.
#31
I see what you're saying, but to describe modes that way is just not useful.
Playing E minor/aeolian - whatever you want to call it - over G major/ionian just doesn't work; it doesn't resolve. Sure, they are relative modes, but not truly modal.
#32
Quote by KillahSquirrel
I see what you're saying, but to describe modes that way is just not useful.
Playing E minor/aeolian - whatever you want to call it - over G major/ionian just doesn't work; it doesn't resolve. Sure, they are relative modes, but not truly modal.


I don't see why you think I'm saying that they would. Modes derived from scales don't necessarily have anything to do with the things they are derived from in a functional sense but they are still modes of that scale.
#34
Quote by Flobbey
Practically every metal song is in the key of a low open string, like E, D or whatever else people down-tune to.


Not true, there's even metal in Eb while the guitar is tuned to E (Through the fire and the flames for example)
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#35
Quote by KillahSquirrel
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They are not the same at all. You can't play E minor in G major, it just doesn't work. You won't be able to resolve. They have the same notes, but they are not the same


You can play E minor licks in G major, as long as you resolve to G, unless I'm missing something.

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#36
jump in the fire by metallica, one of my fav metal songs in G
one of the best metal riffs youll ever heard in that song... its on kill em all
its in standard tuning, what real metal should be.
#37
Quote by Zoso1994
You can play E minor licks in G major, as long as you resolve to G, unless I'm missing something.


The licks are not in E minor if you're playing in G. That's the thing. You might have learned it as being E minor. But it's not. The key depends on the harmony/context of the notes, not a pattern you might have learned off a tab called 'licks in Em'.
#38
Major of minor?
Paradise City is G major.
But that's not really Metal.....
I'll browse through my albums and try to find something.
#39
Quote by Zoso1994
You can play E minor licks in G major, as long as you resolve to G, unless I'm missing something.


You cannot. You can play G major licks in G major, which will have all the same notes as E minor licks, but because the harmony underneath is G major, you must name what you play as G major, not E minor. Its a thing of standardized nomenclature, not of restricting specific notes being played over specific chords.