#1
I want to learn how to write progressive music better, but im not sure where to start.

Should I focus on studying prog bands or continue learning theory?
#2
Quote by Hamer213
I want to learn how to write progressive music better, but im not sure where to start.

Should I focus on studying prog bands or continue learning theory?


Both
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#4
Learn Compound Meter, the combination of duplets & triplets to create odd time signatures, like 5/8, 7/4, 11/8.
By studying songs from prog bands, figure out how they use these meters and attempt to figure out the 'grooves' established in these time signatures, before writing your own.

While learning compound meter, jam out simple riffs in weird counting schemes.

1 & a 2 & a 3 & being basic 4/4 split into three compound beats, so put melodic emphasis on those beats & jam away until you're ready for 1 & a 2 & 3 & (7/8) or 1 & a 2 & (5/8)

Of course, in compound meter there are limitless possibilities.

Figure out what scales they use, jam out using weird rhythms and understand the structure of a progressive song. Good luck in your endeavors.
#5
Well progressive rock or metal or whatever is a really vague label that is applied to a lot of music that does not necessarily share much in common. Get an idea of what sounds you like and try to figure out what they are doing, and what sort of genre it borrows from. Studying harmony and other theory is going to help you no matter what you want to play.
#6
Well i understand meter and time sigs pretty well.

My questions more lie in the melody side of things. Like chords progressions and stuff like that. And how to create odd melodies like the main riff in "Three of a Perfect Pair" by King Crimson.
#7
Quote by Hamer213
Thats what I thought. But which is more essential to learning prog?


Well if want to "study prog bands" you aren't going to get very far without at least a basic understanding of theory.
#8
Quote by thekingofhearts
Learn Compound Meter, the combination of duplets & triplets to create odd time signatures, like 5/8, 7/4, 11/8.
By studying songs from prog bands, figure out how they use these meters and attempt to figure out the 'grooves' established in these time signatures, before writing your own.

While learning compound meter, jam out simple riffs in weird counting schemes.

1 & a 2 & a 3 & being basic 4/4 split into three compound beats, so put melodic emphasis on those beats & jam away until you're ready for 1 & a 2 & 3 & (7/8) or 1 & a 2 & (5/8)

Of course, in compound meter there are limitless possibilities.

Figure out what scales they use, jam out using weird rhythms and understand the structure of a progressive song. Good luck in your endeavors.


Although Im not a huge prog player, this sounds like the best thing to practice. Almost all prog music is grounded in odd time signatures for songs. I would suggest leaning more towards focusing on theory if you don't have a solid theoretical basis. If you do, then focus on analyzing the structures of the prog band tunes you listen to. This way, you have a theoretical idea for what constitutes "progressive" sounding playing.
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#9
Quote by Hamer213
Well i understand meter and time sigs pretty well.

My questions more lie in the melody side of things. Like chords progressions and stuff like that. And how to create odd melodies like the main riff in "Three of a Perfect Pair" by King Crimson.


Learn about harmony. Pick up something like Harmony and Voice Leading by Aldwell and Schachter.
#10
in most prog bands that ive listened to they mostly have odd time sigs and there is always something musically interesting going and there riffs ussually repeated a lot but changing the drums or bass or w/e. and what type prog you thinking of cause opeth is good for prg death and porcupine tree is good for rock
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#11
Quote by kaos572
in most prog bands that ive listened to they mostly have odd time sigs and there is always something musically interesting going and there riffs ussually repeated a lot but changing the drums or bass or w/e. and what type prog you thinking of cause opeth is good for prg death and porcupine tree is good for rock



Well im mostly studying Between the Buried and Me and a little Protest The Hero. But mostly BTBAM. im not a huge fan of Dream Theater and stuff like that.
#12
A couple things to learn would be, as well:

- Proper chord voicing (stray away from using generic chord patterns, find new, interesting ones that are properly voiced in context)

- Scalar resolution (understand why the half-steps in the major scale are where they are, why a melody will sound incomplete and tense in C major when it lands on B, etc, and abuse this knowledge to create moments of tension and release.)

^^,
#13
Quote by Hamer213
Well im mostly studying Between the Buried and Me and a little Protest The Hero. But mostly BTBAM. im not a huge fan of Dream Theater and stuff like that.


Listen to 70's prog like Genesis, Yes, Pink Floyd, Jethro Tull... etc.

And lets get this straight, those bands you mentioned are NOT prog or anything close really.
#14
Well, Protest the Hero fits more into the mathcore genre, and Between The Buried and Me are decently progressive/decently mathcore, so let's not get picky about genre. The same fundamental concepts lie in many genres, and mathcore and progressive are very similar in terms of rhythm, melody, and harmony. Mathcore is just heavier and more metal-centric, where progressive has a more jazz-oriented approach.
^^,
#15
Really the best thing you can do is listen to TONS of different types of music.

Get some death metal in there, maybe some Jazz, Jazz Metal, Progressive metal and rock.

Band wise,
Atheist, Cynic, you really should listen to Dream Theater, Isis, Scale the Summit. Etc.

And the more music theory you know, the better.
#16
Quote by Ssargentslayer
Really the best thing you can do is listen to TONS of different types of music.

Get some death metal in there, maybe some Jazz, Jazz Metal, Progressive metal and rock.

Band wise,
Atheist, Cynic, you really should listen to Dream Theater, Isis, Scale the Summit. Etc.

And the more music theory you know, the better.


Lets not forget Classical music
#17
Just analyse what makes those bands prog? What kind of chords, scale structures do they use. Brushing up on your theory will help you to approach writing music like that from a new perspective.

It's a very generalised question because by definition progressive music isnt a strict sound, hence why you can go from Tull to Opeth and still find similarities in the category, its more of a set of ideals, progressing on exisiting music really. Trying to do something that hasnt been done too much in the past.