#1
I don't quite know how a stack works. I know you plug the head into a cabinet. But, for example if I played a 50 watt head through 2 cabinets is it twice as loud than with one, or is it a bigger sound or what? And if I have a 100 watt cabinet played with a 50 watt head, will it be louder than a 50 watt cab with the same head or does it mean it can just take more power potentially. And what does Ohms mean on an amp. Sorry for all the questions but I am new to stacks, I've been playing combos. Thanks in advance, Dave.
#2
Let me explain.
Speakers do not produce power.
A 50 watt amplifier into a 100 watt cabinet will not be louder than a 50 watt cabinet.
But It will have a higher amount of headroom.
Headroom is the amount of voluume before clipping.
In a sence it takes the power better.

Ohms are the measuring unit of Resistance.
If your ristance from cabinet to amplifier does not match up, you could be in dire trouble.
Make sure they always match up.
#3
Two cabs is technically louder, but it's only like 3-5 decibels or somehting like that.

Only handles more power, doesn't make it louder.

Ohms is the resistance. Like an 8 ohm cab would need the head to be set to 8 ohms, a 16 ohm cab would need the head at 16 ohms.... etc.

STREDIT: Not really. I can't exactly remember, but the ohms can not match up. I just forget if it's the head is lower than the cab or vice versa... But the can. Will it sound as good as exact match? Not really.
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Last edited by stratman_13 at Aug 23, 2009,
#4
If you really want to get technical I could break open the chapter on electronics for you in my physics book and give you an Ohms-Lecture

All you really need to be definate on is that those numbers match up!

EDIT: With the unpredictability of Tubed amplification you best damn match those numbers!

And the Resistance would probably have to be less than the head theoretically so the amp gets rid of its entire load consistantly. Yes?
Last edited by [[BurnTheDusk]] at Aug 23, 2009,
#5
[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Ohms are the measuring unit of Resistance.
If your ristance from cabinet to amplifier does not match up, you could be in dire trouble.
Make sure they always match up.
In this case, Ohms designate impedance, not resistance.

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#7
[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']If you really want to get technical I could break open the chapter on electronics for you in my physics book and give you an Ohms-Lecture

All you really need to be definate on is that those numbers match up!

EDIT: With the unpredictability of Tubed amplification you best damn match those numbers!

And the Resistance would probably have to be less than the head theoretically so the amp gets rid of its entire load consistantly. Yes?
I know that they should definitely be matched up. But I also know that there's some way to run them mismatched, but I can't remember which way it goes.

It's definitely not good, but you can do it, that's all I'm saying
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How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

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#8
Don't come crying to me Stratman when you try out this confounded Ohms experiment and you blow up somebodys Grandmother!
#9


Dude I'm not telling him to do it, I'm just pointing out a fact

TS, please, please match up the ohms if you decide to get a head. It's the surefire way to not fry your amp.

There, Dusk, you happy?
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#10
I'm still calling my Grandma and telling her not to hang out with the lot of you anymore!
#11
Quote by stratman_13
I know that they should definitely be matched up. But I also know that there's some way to run them mismatched, but I can't remember which way it goes.

It's definitely not good, but you can do it, that's all I'm saying


You'd just lose power if you made sure the head is running at a lower impedance than a cab. Never put an amp's impedance selector higher than the cab's impedance. The amp won't be able to get rid of all it's power and you'll ruin your OT.
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#12
Quote by hardrockerdave9
I don't quite know how a stack works. I know you plug the head into a cabinet. But, for example if I played a 50 watt head through 2 cabinets is it twice as loud than with one, or is it a bigger sound or what? And if I have a 100 watt cabinet played with a 50 watt head, will it be louder than a 50 watt cab with the same head or does it mean it can just take more power potentially. And what does Ohms mean on an amp. Sorry for all the questions but I am new to stacks, I've been playing combos. Thanks in advance, Dave.
Typically more speakers mean you are moving air over a larger area, this typically means a "bigger" not louder sound. The wattage on the speaker refers only to it's power handling and has nothing to do with it's volume.

The rule of thumb for head wattage and speaker wattage is that you want the total power handling of the cabinet to be at least 1.5x that of the head. Some amps can put out way more than their listed wattage, it all depends on how the maker rates the amp and at what point they start to break up. For example, one could use a 30 watt speaker with a Vox AC30 and be fine, the AC30 only puts out ~35 watts running full tilt and the speaker can handle some of that extra power, but try 30 watts with a Marshall JTM45, which is also rated at "30" watts, watch it go up in flames.

In terms of ohms... it's kind of a touchy subject, generally you want to match the impedance, BUT... there are some cases where it is OK to mismatch, some amps tolerate it better than others. I do it all the time on my amp, running my amp at 8 ohms into my cab that is 4 ohms, but would not on others as my amp is a specific case.