#1
I'm having a hard time finding a 100 watt combo bass amp with 2 channels, clean and distortion, a foot pedal to switch them and an EQ for under 500 bucks, but i could get my hands on a guitar amp that does all of this for 450. I know you're not supposed to play bass through a guitar amp but i'm not completely sure why, if someone could elaborate id be thankful. I assume it'd be something in the amp that you could change, maybe i could get this guitar amp and then switch out some resistors or the speaker and use it as a bass amp


tl;dr what do i have to do to a guitar amp to make it fit for playing bass
#2
pu a bass speaker in there, it will sound like gay though
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#3
Unless this is a tube amp you're talking about, a bass distortion pedal will sound just as good.
#4
Quote by pwrmax
Unless this is a tube amp you're talking about, a bass distortion pedal will sound just as good.


I think its a valve amp, at least that's what the buddy said, he never told me much more than that, it was only mentioned in passing. And i probably wont, cause 450 for a used 100w guitar amp is a bit much i think, I'm more interested in knowing if its possible. And I'm hoping a bass distortion is my last resort.

Quote by dave2233
pu a bass speaker in there, it will sound like gay though


What does "gay" sound like, will it sound unique? cause then that's probably a good thing.


Edit: fixed quote tags
#6
Hook it up to bass speakers. That doesn't mean it will sound good though, the amp itself might not have enough lows.
#7
To get it to sound like a bass amp, you'd have to do some mods to it. Nothing too dramatic (removing most if not all of the cathode bypass caps in the preamp).

I'd go w/ bass speakers too.

And it isn't automatically going to sound like ass either...one of the most coveted amps out there for electric guitar, the 5F6-A Fender Bassman, was (as the name suggests) a bass amp that worked great for electric. No reason it can't work the other way.
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#8
Some guitar amps are very easy to mod for bass while others are very difficult. If the amp is one that is easy to mod then it'll probably be a valve amp of some sort. As a general rule you just double the value of the filter caps and coupling caps, change the speaker, and if the amp has a valve rectifier you change it to a solid state rectifier (a step that must be performed if you are going to double your filter caps). Then you swap speakers and play with valves and biasing (often this means changing the cathode resistor value or removing a cathode resistor bypass cap) until you get everything sounding right. If you don't know much about amps then you are stuck getting yourself a real bass amp and a good distortion pedal.


It should also be noticed that in the early days of Marshall their bass amps and their guitar amps used exactly the same circuits.
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Last edited by CorduroyEW at Aug 24, 2009,
#9
One thing everyone is failing to mention is the frequency response of the output transformer. You'll want to make sure the output transformer can produce low frequencies (I'd say 30 hz, but you could make do with 40 hz).
#10
Quote by DLrocket89
And it isn't automatically going to sound like ass either...one of the most coveted amps out there for electric guitar, the 5F6-A Fender Bassman, was (as the name suggests) a bass amp that worked great for electric. No reason it can't work the other way.


It worked great for electric, but not so great for bass. Those 10" speakers didn't really have enough low end.