#1
I love my 62 reissue Strat. I really do. But I can't keep it in tune when I use the tremolo. And by the way using is an overstatement. I only gently caress is ala Gilmour and never dive.

I've got he Strat set up according to Fender specs - 1/8'' off the body, 3 springs, both nut and saddles well lubed. The guitar plays in perfect tune when bending, but as soon as I tap the tremolo, the whole thing goes out of whack.

This is what happens:
Let's say the guitar is in tune.
I tap the tremolo and B and G strings go sharp, D string goes flat.
I then bend a few notes on the B and G srings and they both go flat. whereas the D returns to its original position more or less.

I could have lived with going sharp when using the tremolo if the post tremolo bend was to restore the original tuning, but going flat with the post tremolo bend just makes the whole thing unusable.

Any suggestions?
#2
It's most likely that you're not restringing the guitar correctly in the first place. This is the cause of the vast majority of tuning problems on all guitars; you can even get a £100 plywood generic Strat copy to stay in tune if it's been set up and restrung correctly.

There's been lots of posts about how to restring correctly and I belive my guide and another person's guides are in one of the stickied threads, so I suggest you take a look at those.


The other thing is I don't buy into Fender's suggestion of having the back of the bridge base plate 1/8th of an inch off the body. It never works for me. If I tighten the springs so the bridge is flat to the body, and then give the springs another turn or two just to make sure, then it's fine. It does of course limit your vibrato range and make the action of the bridge stiffer, but if you're only doing the occasional light flutter then it probably won't make any difference to you anyway, though it can greatly help tuning stability.
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#3
Quote by MrFlibble
It's most likely that you're not restringing the guitar correctly in the first place. This is the cause of the vast majority of tuning problems on all guitars; you can even get a £100 plywood generic Strat copy to stay in tune if it's been set up and restrung correctly.

There's been lots of posts about how to restring correctly and I belive my guide and another person's guides are in one of the stickied threads, so I suggest you take a look at those.


The other thing is I don't buy into Fender's suggestion of having the back of the bridge base plate 1/8th of an inch off the body. It never works for me. If I tighten the springs so the bridge is flat to the body, and then give the springs another turn or two just to make sure, then it's fine. It does of course limit your vibrato range and make the action of the bridge stiffer, but if you're only doing the occasional light flutter then it probably won't make any difference to you anyway, though it can greatly help tuning stability.


You might hate me for this, but could you point me to this restring guide that you wrote? Thanks in advance

EDIT: Never mind - I found it and this is the exact same way I do it...
Last edited by Sirakov at Aug 24, 2009,
#4
Quote by MrFlibble
It's most likely that you're not restringing the guitar correctly in the first place. This is the cause of the vast majority of tuning problems on all guitars; you can even get a £100 plywood generic Strat copy to stay in tune if it's been set up and restrung correctly.

There's been lots of posts about how to restring correctly and I belive my guide and another person's guides are in one of the stickied threads, so I suggest you take a look at those.


The other thing is I don't buy into Fender's suggestion of having the back of the bridge base plate 1/8th of an inch off the body. It never works for me. If I tighten the springs so the bridge is flat to the body, and then give the springs another turn or two just to make sure, then it's fine. It does of course limit your vibrato range and make the action of the bridge stiffer, but if you're only doing the occasional light flutter then it probably won't make any difference to you anyway, though it can greatly help tuning stability.


This is very correct. Also, if your tuning still blows up afterwards, I would advise you check out your saddles for wear and replace the nut if it's plastic.