#2
First one's Db minor 7, but you would definitely NOT fret it that way unless you have giant hands.
#3
The first is a Db minor chord

The second is Gb6 and then Gb7 when you do the hammer on to the sixth fret
#4
I think the second one is an F# maj 7 to a F#maj


Edit: Nevermind, I think I'm wrong on that one. The guy above me sounds right.
Last edited by DasFishy at Aug 24, 2009,
#6
Quote by The Horror!
The first is a Db minor chord


With dominant 7th, the unfretted Eb. Makes it a Db minor seventh.
#7
Quote by Guitarfailwin
With dominant 7th, the unfretted Eb. Makes it a Db minor seventh.


My bad, Eb ain't Db's seventh.
#8
Quote by Guitarfailwin
First one's Db minor 7, but you would definitely NOT fret it that way unless you have giant hands.

There's no C in that chord, so it's not a 7 chord, and it's not too ridiculously hard to fret; he's probably only asking b/c he can reach

Quote by DasFishy
I think the second one is an F# maj 7 to a F#maj

No, there's no maj 7 in either of those chords; the only note that changes is that the 6 becomes a dominant 7
#9
OK, try Eb minor9 and F#6.

EDIT: Make that F#11, there's still a perfect fifth.

SECOND EDIT: Until you fret the F on the B string. My bad AGAIN.
Last edited by Guitarfailwin at Aug 24, 2009,
#11
Quote by Guitarfailwin
OK, try Eb minor9 and F#6.

Quote by Guitarfailwin
And yeah, the first one's impossible to fret.

The first is a simple Db minor chord not Ebm9; try fretting it like this
Second string third finger
Third string first finger
Fourth string second finger
Fifth string fourth finger

If I can fret it you can, my middle finger isn't even three inches long
#12
To fret the second chord (the Gb6 chord I mean) do as such:
Sixth string first finger
Fifth string second finger
Fourth string third finger
Second string fourth finger

Alternatively use your thumb for the sixth string

The hammer on is impossible (unless you use your picking hand) though you can slide up with your fourth finger
Last edited by The Horror! at Aug 24, 2009,
#13
Quote by The Horror!
The first is a simple Db minor chord not Ebm9; try fretting it like this
Second string third finger
Third string first finger
Fourth string second finger
Fifth string fourth finger

If I can fret it you can, my middle finger isn't even three inches long


Thats pretty impressive, especially considering I find it awkward (although not a big stretch) and my middle finger is just over four and a half
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#14
Quote by Guitarfailwin
And yeah, the first one's impossible to fret.



i'm pretty sure I (and many others) can fret that just fine. fail?

It might be awkward if your not used to it, but its not hard. and I definately do not have huge hands, mid sized hands at best.
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#16
Quote by The Horror!
The first is a simple Db minor chord



It is a C#m(add9) chord
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 25, 2009,
#17
Quote by Guitarfailwin
First one's Db minor 7, but you would definitely NOT fret it that way unless you have giant hands.

What?
Thats an easy chord.
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#18
Quote by griffRG7321
It is a C#m(add9) chord


Regardless of whether you call it a C# minor or Db minor, what is indisputable is the FACT that there is NO ADDED 9 in that chord, that's settled, thread is over
#19
Quote by The Horror!
Regardless of whether you call it a C# minor or Db minor, what is indisputable is the FACT that there is NO ADDED 9 in that chord, that's settled, thread is over


So an D# added to a C#min chord doesn't make it a m(add9)? ok

It's a C#m(add9)


It would be most commonly be called a C#min(add9) since key signtures with a Dbm chord in them are Db minor (Fb major) Gb minor (Bbb major) and Ab minor (Cb major) which contain a hell of a lot of flats, therefore the simpler enharmonic key sigs are used - C#m (4 sharps) F# min (3 sharps) and G#minor (5 sharps).
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 26, 2009,
#20
Quote by griffRG7321
So an D# added to a C#min chord doesn't make it a m(add9)? ok

It's a C#m(add9)


It would be most commonly be called a C#min(add9) since key signtures with a Dbm chord in them are Db minor (Fb major) Gb minor (Bbb major) and Ab minor (Cb major) which contain a hell of a lot of flats, therefore the simpler enharmonic key sigs are used - C#m (4 sharps) F# min (3 sharps) and G#minor (5 sharps).


OH NO, sorry I didn't see the open string, I thought he had it muted