#1
Metronomes confuse the poo out of me. I get what they do, in some way. Then I hear most people talking about doing 16ths at 240? Is that like 16 notes between every click? I'm trying to figure out how fast I can play. But I'm lost lol.

Anyway, aside from the prior question, can someone tell me what the speed is of Avenged Sevenfold - Bat Country, where the verse first starts. Not the RAAAAAAA part, where Shadows actual has lyrics lol. Even if I can't figure out how to use a metronome I can kind of base it off that... Even if it is faster lol.


"Hey I played 16ths going 200!"
"Well I play 3.5x Bat Country speed, B*TCH!"

Oh, and I couldn't figure out what forum this went into, so sorry if its the wrong one.
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#2
LOL, 16ths means 4 notes per click. Basically, a measure in music is divided into 4 beats. so quarter notes, eighths, etc., are divisions of the measure rather than of a single beat.
#3
a bar is typically 4 beats in duration (in common time) so a 16th note lasts 1/16th of a bar, or 1/4 of a beat. That means to play 16ths at 240 you would be playing 4 notes per-click.

Measuring how fast you play shouldn't be very important to music. It's useful to be able to play fast sometimes as it gives you more options in terms of what you can do musically, but it's a means to an end not an end in itself. The only purposeful reason to measure your speed is if you have set personal targets of practice and speeds you wish to reach. It then makes no difference how you measure your speed, so long as you're consistent. That's not to say don't practice your speed up - just make sure you do it for the right reasons.

As a side note metronomes typically range between 40-208bpm i have no idea why 208 is an upper limit but i've seen it on more digital metronomes than i care to mention. anyone know why?
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#4
Quote by doive
As a side note metronomes typically range between 40-208bpm i have no idea why 208 is an upper limit but i've seen it on more digital metronomes than i care to mention. anyone know why?

Maybe metronomes don't like shredders

As for the first verse of Bat Country, it seems to be around 125-130 or so. If you want to find the tempo for a song you can find programs on the internet that let you tap to the beat of the song while listening and the program will tell you what speed you are clicking at.
#5
I'm guessing that songs just don't generally go over 200 BPM, unless its some shredder just showing off. and 40 bpm is just ridiculously slow
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#6
Quote by turtlewax
I'm guessing that songs just don't generally go over 200 BPM, unless its some shredder just showing off. and 40 bpm is just ridiculously slow


Most of those shredder songs aren't over 200. They just contain 32nd and 64th notes. Listening to the drums is generally a better way to find the bpm, than listening to the guitar.
#7
Yer it's true, you never see anything much over 200bpm - but that still doesn't explain why they all go up to EXACTLY 208bpm - someone must have decided that at some point. i want to know why.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
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Practice more
#9
Quote by doive
Yer it's true, you never see anything much over 200bpm - but that still doesn't explain why they all go up to EXACTLY 208bpm - someone must have decided that at some point. i want to know why.

Seems to be based on the original patent for the metronome awarded to Maelzel in 1816 when he started manufacturing. His scale was described in a lawsuit (he stole the design) as "Maelzel's scale was needlessly and arbitrarily complicated, proceeding by twos from 40 to 60, by threes from 60 to 72, by fours from 72 to 120, by sixes from 120 to 144 and by eights from 144 to 208"

So obviously we should use this as our basis since it didn't really make sense back then either.

This is also where the "MM 40" standard metronome came from.

For more useless trivia please see:

http://www.1911encyclopedia.org/Metronome
Last edited by Quintex at Aug 26, 2009,
#10
What are yall talkin about? Metronomes go faster than 208. The one sitting in front of me goes up to 255! And I have another one that goes to 270!

To ts. I guarantee if you learn to read music, this question will answer itself