#1
Posted in the wrong part of the forum last time.

Why is the formula for a m6 chord 1 b3 5 6
shouldn't it have a flattened 6th because the sixth is flattened in the minor scale?
#2
The chord is based off of Dorian. If you wanted a lowered 6 scale degree in the chord (e, g, b, c) then you would write Em(b6).
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#4
so its the minor 3rd that says the chord is minor, and only if stated, a minor 6 wud instead be used, correct?
#7
If the sixth was flattened the chord would simply be a major 7th in first inversion, whose root is a major 3rd lower than the root of the m(b6) chord.
#9
Quote by timeconsumer09
All chord extensions are major unless noted otherwise.


If I were to write a dim9, would it be 1, b3, b5, bb7, 9? If it is, then there would be an augmented third between the seventh and ninth. I'd always assumed diminished chords would have minor 9ths and 13ths...
#10
Quote by isaac_bandits
If I were to write a dim9, would it be 1, b3, b5, bb7, 9? If it is, then there would be an augmented third between the seventh and ninth. I'd always assumed diminished chords would have minor 9ths and 13ths...


I'm almost positive it would be major.
#11
Quote by timeconsumer09
I'm almost positive it would be major.


The only problem I have with that is the augmented third between the bb7 and nat9. Normally [non-altered] chords are extended by adding major or minor thirds, but never with augmented ones.
#12
Quote by isaac_bandits
The only problem I have with that is the augmented third between the bb7 and nat9. Normally [non-altered] chords are extended by adding major or minor thirds, but never with augmented ones.


But chords also normally don't have double-flatted intervals.
#13
Quote by timeconsumer09
But chords also normally don't have double-flatted intervals.


Diminished chords always do. I was expecting a b9 or bb9 (enharmonic to 1) for a Dim9. Since the bb9 is enharmonic to 1, Dim9 would be the same as Dim7, thus I assumed one would add a b9.
#14
Quote by isaac_bandits
Diminished chords always do. I was expecting a b9 or bb9 (enharmonic to 1) for a Dim9. Since the bb9 is enharmonic to 1, Dim9 would be the same as Dim7, thus I assumed one would add a b9.


Well diminishd chords obviously being the only ones, which was what i was getting at. Wait for archeo or someone to reply, they'll know for sure. I was just always under the impression that extensions were major no matter the quality of the chord you're adding to.
#15
Quote by timeconsumer09
All chord extensions are major unless noted otherwise.


C7?
#16
If you're playing in a minor scale then you can use the sixth chord as the sub-dominant, but not the tonic (that is of course unless you're playing in Dorian, as mentioned) so for example in the key of E minor you could use an Am6 chord. In a major key you can use it for the second degree, ie. Dm6 in the key of C major, once again not used as the tonic.
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#17
Quote by deHufter
C7?


C7 is C major dominant seven, so the dominant states that the seventh is flat.
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#18
Quote by Wiegenlied
C7 is C major dominant seven, so the dominant states that the seventh is flat.


I know you call it a dominant 7, but the extension 7 without major is b7 and that one's not in major. And that was the point: 'unless noted otherwise'.
#19
^but it is noted as dominant. C7 is the universally understood way of writing C Dominant 7.
I think that is just being pedantic, you could say that a Cm7 does not specify the state of the 7th under the same point. (the m specifying the 3rd)

I agree with the original statement.

A Dim9 chord has a major 9th. This is not to say it makes sense, or would be commonplace.... it is just nomenclature.
#20
Quote by branny1982
I think that is just being pedantic


I think that's just an exception to the rule.
#21
i've never fully understood why a 7th chord is a b7 but a 6th chord is a natural 6. I always just accepted it in my head and thought "it's probably something to do with avoiding potentially dissonant semitone gaps".

does any one have a good theoretical reason as to why? (prefereably one they can reference)

Also when dealing with chord extentions the fact that the chord is major/minor/dim doesn't have any effect on the extension, it only effect the 3rd/5th.
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#22
The dominant seventh chord has a flat seventh because it's used on the fifth (dominant degree) which has a flat seventh (think Mixolydian mode). The interval between the 3rd and 7th notes in a dominant chord make a tritone which provides the most dissonance possible before resolving to the tonic. The maj7 chord doesn't have that dissonance but the degrees are all natural so it can be used as the tonic chord in a major key, as well as the sub-dominant.

The reason the chord extensions isn't affected by the tonality of the chord is because everything in modern music theory is based off the major scale. Plus, assuming everything would be flatted simply because the chord is minor would be completly ridicolous. Then we'd be enforncing the scale degrees of the superlocrain scale, rather then the minor. The minor scale only has three flatten degrees the 3rd (which is assumed), the 6th, and the 7th (dominant). Imagine if you had a m9 chord and you had to assume the 9th was flat. Obviously, that would not only sound incredibly dissonant but ruin the function of the chord. Writing music in this manner would force composer to alter so many chord construction and create endless confusion. It's safe to assume everything in reference to the major scale.
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