#1
OK, so I know the notes on the fretboard and alot of scales. But, I've always wondered why there is no B# or E#, but there is A#,C#,D#,F#,and G#.
Why is that? I cant figure that out.
Thanx for the help
#3
There are, depending on what scale you are in. the C# Scale is composed of C#, D#, E#, F#, G#, A#, and B#.
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#4
B# is the same as C and E# is the same as F. all notes on are a whole step away from each other except these, which are only a half step
#6
Those terms are just uncommon because it's easier to say "F" than it is to say "E#" when naming basic notes. However, the names are all contextual. The posts above me by sixstringsteve and the one above him have hit the nail on the head in terms of a direct answer.
#7
Quote by awesomo41894
OK, so I know the notes on the fretboard and alot of scales. But, I've always wondered why there is no B# or E#, but there is A#,C#,D#,F#,and G#.
Why is that? I cant figure that out.
Thanx for the help


E# and B# do technically exist but they are just commonly called F and C. That's because on a piano, between B and C, and E and F, there's no black key. Between all the other notes, there is a black key which is sharp/flat. So since there is no key between B and C, and E and F, that means there is no fret between them on the guitar.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.