#1
I've been playing guitar for several years. All I've ever done has been to look at tabs and try to figure out how to play them. I know one position of the major scale (I think it's called the E shape) and having only recently learned that more shapes exist, started working with the D shape this week. I know a "blues scale" though I'm not even sure which one it is. I know what quarter notes, half notes, etc. are. I know the notes on the fretboard but only if I start from the 12th fret or the open string and figure it out by going up one fret at a time.

Despite how this makes me sound, I'm really not a bad guitar player. My problem comes in trying to write material and not having enough theory to fall back on to help me find interesting compositions.

Every time I try to find an article or video to help me they go off into all this lingo that I don't understand. I don't know what a fifth or a ninth is, I don't know what a degree of a scale is, I don't really understand intervals or the principles behind scales, or any of those things, yet this is the way every video or lesson explains the concepts. I end up not being able to understand what they're trying to teach because they assume I already know all this stuff when I do not. Is there any source for people like me that have minimal knowledge and want to start from the ground up?
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
#2
Learn the notes of the fretboard first
There are aload of sites that have those!
you just have to search and dont try and have a big ego and just skip the beginner secition just go on it
#3
if it helps. there are some figures/tricks of learning the notes.
Like the 5th fret one string is same notes as open next string(except for G and B)
and skip a string and move 2 frets further you have the same tone

example:
D:-4---6---7
A:-------------
E:-2---4---5
F# G# A

Al the same notes, higher octave. This also applies on A and G string but again not on B(there you have to go 3 steps up from D)
#4
Buy a Theory book, and forget "D shapes and E shapes". Learn what notes are in the scales and learn all the notes on the neck so if someone says, play in F# major for example, you can instantly think the notes you can use are F# G# A# B C# D# E# and be able to find them anywhere on the neck.
#7
You've answered your own question - you know what the gaps in your knowledge are so fill them. The best way to progress on guitar is simply to look at your current limits and look to move on directly from there, to learn the next thing you don't know...that approach will automatically lead you on to anything else you may want to learn.

Video lessons are useless for theory - theory isn't a visual concept. If you don't understand something just look it up, all the information you need is available on the net for free, you just have to spend a bit of time looking.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Last edited by steven seagull at Aug 26, 2009,
#9
Oh, well those ones are probably pretty good
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by Freepower


Some people learn better when they're spoken to in a slightly disdainful manner by a lanky bloke with a shaved head.


Why did they not get you to teach in my school?! I would have excelled being taught under such circumstances!
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#12
Hell, I don't know. The people in charge just don't seem to understand esoteric educational needs. I learn best from Eliza Dushku but the state just won't fund the pilot programme.
#13
Quote by Freepower
Hell, I don't know. The people in charge just don't seem to understand esoteric educational needs. I learn best from Eliza Dushku but the state just won't fund the pilot programme.


Obviously we need to march on local government buildings and get them to free up more funding for things like this; stuff road maintainence, I need to be taught things by... uuhhh... Olivia Munn.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#14
Quote by Freepower
^ speaking of useless video lessons, I think I have some pretty good video lessons on theory for beginners on my youtube account. Give em a go.


Those bite sized theory videos are indeed awesome, thanks for making them!

I've also discovered www.scalerator.com which is proving to be a very handy tool
Andy Fox
Hard rock guitarist
I play a Jackson DK-2 and an Ibanez RG through a Peavey 6505+ stack
#15
The way I learned modes was pretty simple get a notebook and a pencil and write down all the notes in the A major scale then the intervals next to it... Like A-B-Dflat-D-E-Eflat-Gflat-Aflat the intervals are whole,whole,half,whole,whole,whole,half

Now instead of starting the A start on the second note (B) and you got B dorian and so on and so on...there's a million sites for this....then you'll figure out what scales are relative which adds for interesting playing...like C major/A minor,A minor/E phrygian....this helped me out a lot...

I love studying theory because you can figure it out yourself without anyones help with a pencil and paper....
Fender 70s Ri Strats w/various Dimarzios
Modded 1982 Marshall JCM800 2203

Boss DS-1,Dunlop Crybaby,MXR Phase 90,Ibanez AD9,Boss CH-1

Check out randy dobsons underground ,tell me what you think
#16
Relative scales don't make for interesting playing - "using relative scales" over the same progression amounts to nothing more than using the major scale.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#17
Quote by rdobson2

Now instead of starting the A start on the second note (B) and you got B dorian and so on and so on...there's a million sites for this....then you'll figure out what scales are relative which adds for interesting playing...like C major/A minor,A minor/E phrygian....this helped me out a lot...




Starting on a different note does not mean you are playing modally.

IMO people should totally scrap the idea of teaching modes by 'how they relate to what scale degree you start on' and instead just teach them the intervals, it would be alot less confusing.
#18
Quote by griffRG7321
Starting on a different note does not mean you are playing modally.

IMO people should totally scrap the idea of teaching modes by 'how they relate to what scale degree you start on' and instead just teach them the intervals, it would be alot less confusing.


agreed. I severely underestimated the power of knowing intervals up till a few weeks ago. They make things so much easier to work out.
--Clips in profile! comment please!--
Guitars
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
Schecter Solo-6 Limited
Takamine G330H

Amps
Line 6 Vetta
Carvin X100B

Pedals
cmatmods Signa Drive, Brownie, and Boost
Morley Bad Horsie 2 Wah
MXR 10 band EQ