#1
I've had it with both my Strats going out of tune with the lightest touch of the tremolo. I've followed every advice on this planet - from locking tuners, to graph-tech nuts and saddles, meticulous strings stretching, slanting the spring claw, lubricating the whole damn house.

It's not working.

On both my Strats, using the tremolo will always return my pitch sharp. It doesn't help that I am really picky and demanding of my tuning - even a slight deviation will drive me nuts.

Anyway, I've read a lot about devices that help tuning stability and ordered a Tremsetter. It all honesty it has been sitting in my case for a month now, because I honestly hoped I could address the tuning issues the old fashioned way. Well, I tried everything and my Strats are still going out of tune.

I am aware that the Tremsetter is tricky to fit (involving drilling and accurate measurements), but who cares I might as well try it.

Anyone able to share any experience? Reasons why I should not do it?
Last edited by Sirakov at Aug 26, 2009,
#2
I have installed a tremsetter on my parts o caster (all fender parts) and let me tell you it was the single best mod I made to that guitar. It now stays in tune for weeks at a time even with trem use. Strats now coming out of the Fender custom shop have the tremsetter as either an option or standard equipment. I'd say it's pretty telling that a manufacturer thinks an aftermarket device is so good it starts offering it on it's guitars. Also while your at it replace the springs with new ones, they are cheap enough and it will help as well.

If your not comfortable with drilling on your axe I'd take it to a competent luthier who can install it for you. If you want to do it yourself there are a couple of video's (from the manufacturer and others) on youtube that can show you how to install and adjust it.

Jim

Edit: There is one other trick to try if you only do dives on the trem. You can tighten the springs till the trem lies flat on the body and returns there after you use the bar. Make sure to use enough spring tension so that bends to not pull the trem up off the body.
Also use a good type of lube on the nut. I use gun oil (Hoppe's no. 9 to be exact) others I have heard use graphite type compounds. A string not sliding in the nut can cause all kinds of tuning issues.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Aug 31, 2009,
#3
My experience was exactly the opposite of the above - I fitted it, adjusted it, didn't stop it going out of tune, repeated many many times and in the end I gave up. One thing it did do, as claiming, was stop other strings going out of tune when bending.

Then I fitted a Wilkinson Trem (a proper one, with a big steel block) and I've not had a single problem with it going out of tune since.

I'm sure it can work - I just think my problem wasn't something a tremsetter could help with - since I changed to a Wilkinson 2 point trem, it's been like a different guitar.
#4
^Then your problem has probably been more in the realm of crummy saddles.
Quote by Sirakov
...slanting the spring claw...

This will never work. It's just not mechanically possible.
#5
Do your strings only raise in pitch when you lift the bar or does it happen when you depress it too?
I used to have a problem with my trem raising in pitch after lifting and lowering in pitch after depressing. That was sorted pretty quickly after fiddling with the knife edges.
#6
Quote by Pikka Bird
^Then your problem has probably been more in the realm of crummy saddles.


Quite possibly - they were the only things I hadn't change - mainly because decent ones were about the same same price as the whole Wilkinson trem, but I was suffering the same issue as the OP, so a Tremsetter may not fix his issue either!
#7
Quote by sparkeyjames

Also use a good type of lube on the nut. I use gun oil (Hoppe's no. 9 to be exact) others I have heard use graphite type compounds. A string not sliding in the nut can cause all kinds of tuning issues.


Who told you to use Hoppe's 009 as a lubricant?

009 is a copper fouling remover! I soak my bores in 009 so that it dissolves the copper and other fouling in the barrel, before I swab it out. I wouldn't use Hoppe's as a lube because it's corrosive!

Nitro-Solvent, the most universally used solvent for removing primer, powder, lead and metal fouling - for preventing rust. Quick, super-efficient, safe and easy to use. Flows freely and penetrates rapidly. Five sizes meet every cleaning requirement.


From Here
Quote by Cal UK

...that's what Skeet always says anyway and he's a sex god.


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#8
Quote by Skeet UK
Who told you to use Hoppe's 009 as a lubricant?

009 is a copper fouling remover! I soak my bores in 009 so that it dissolves the copper and other fouling in the barrel, before I swab it out. I wouldn't use Hoppe's as a lube because it's corrosive!


From Here


Try reading it does wonders. My post does NOT say 009 it says Hoppe's no. 9 it is a light lubricating oil. It is not corrosive. It can be used on (so the label says) guns, fishing reels, and other mechanisms. It also has no odor. Used to use it on my paintball guns.

And I'll one up you a link...

http://www.hoppes.com/products/lubricating_oil.html
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Aug 31, 2009,
#9
It's a good investment if there's nothing left to do. I know a guy with one on a strat. Doesn't kill tone or anything. Don't know how easy it is to install or anything, but it works the way it should.
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#10
Quote by sparkeyjames
Try reading it does wonders. My post does NOT say 009 it says Hoppe's no. 9 it is a light lubricating oil. It is not corrosive. It can be used on (so the label says) guns, fishing reels, and other mechanisms. It also has no odor. Used to use it on my paintball guns.

And I'll one up you a link...

http://www.hoppes.com/products/lubricating_oil.html


You're a sarky mofo aren't you!

I assumed you had neglected to put the two 0's in. I was not aware that they also did a No9, that happens to be a lubricant.

I think we can both agree that the information I posted is HIGHLY valid, if someone were to go out an buy 009 to do what you said with (albeit by mistake).
Quote by Cal UK

...that's what Skeet always says anyway and he's a sex god.


Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list


I support Shay van Fani
I can supply WD Music, ABM and AllParts products to UK builders at DISCOUNTED prices!
#11
Quote by mark_wuk
My experience was exactly the opposite of the above - I fitted it, adjusted it, didn't stop it going out of tune, repeated many many times and in the end I gave up. One thing it did do, as claiming, was stop other strings going out of tune when bending.

Then I fitted a Wilkinson Trem (a proper one, with a big steel block) and I've not had a single problem with it going out of tune since.

I'm sure it can work - I just think my problem wasn't something a tremsetter could help with - since I changed to a Wilkinson 2 point trem, it's been like a different guitar.



What was the original trem on that axe? A Fender 2 point? Did you fit the tremsetter to the Wilkinson? Just askin.

The tremsetter I put on my strat is connected to a 62 reissue trem with the stamped steel (chromed) saddles and the 6 screw body mount.

When I got everything put together I was getting a strange tinking sound after doing a dive on the trem. Drove me nuts for about 3 days. After taking the bridge off and examining everything it dawned on me that the noise might not be coming from the bridge. All though it sounded like it was. Once I lubed the strings going across the nut that stopped. Been smooth sailing ever since.
Last edited by sparkeyjames at Sep 1, 2009,