#2
hmmmm.... jazz can be a very complex genre. i'd suggest you start off by just jamming on a 1-4-5 blues progression.

jazz is very much improv based, so brush up on your scales and realting them to the right chord changes.

or, if you're feeling brave, listen to some pat methaney.
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#3
Quote by Jhachey22
hmmmm.... jazz can be a very complex genre. i'd suggest you start off by just jamming on a 1-4-5 blues progression.

jazz is very much improv based, so brush up on your scales and realting them to the right chord changes.

or, if you're feeling brave, listen to some pat methaney.

Agreed.

After a while, try some Les Paul (RIP) stuff.
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#4
Wes Montgomery.
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#5
I suppose Yes would be considered jazz/rock fusion stuff which may be a good stepping stone. Have a look at what Steve Howe does in 'Yours is No Disgrace'. I'm pretty sure he played a Barney Kessel Gibson back then. Gorgeous tone.
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#6
If you can, take a look at some "taste" (Rory Gallagher's old band), it's very jazz based (the drummer, is amazing at the jazzy stuff. . .well was, when Taste were still playing) but it's a lot rawer and more simplistic (if you've ever heard Rory Gallagher's stuff, imagine that but jazzier).
#7
If you want players to listen to, I can give you several who have solos that aren't very difficult to learn. The best way to learn jazz is by learning solos, and picking the solos apart to see why the player played what they did over the changes.

First, check out Charlie Christian. He was around during the Swing Era, so his stuff is pretty old-fashioned, but a lot of the stuff he played with the Benny Goodman Orchestra is simple and blues-based, so it shouldn't be too hard to grasp. Wes Montgomery taught himself to play jazz by learning every Charlie Christian solo.

Speaking of Wes, he's also a great player to listen to when you're first starting out. Well, he's good even if you're a jazz legend, but he's also a good player to try to learn solos from.

Third, Jim Hall. Now, Jim Hall does stuff that might be a bit over your head harmonically (or WAY over your head, since you're just starting out), but he's known for playing really melodic stuff that isn't that complicated in technique. I'd give him a shot.

Now, for more modern players, I'd start with John Scofield. Get a copy of A Go Go, which is a great album, full of tracks that are based mostly around short vamps. He does some really cool stuff on there, and you should take every opportunity to steal every lick on that album. I wouldn't recommend trying to learn his earlier stuff until much, much later, because it's fusion, and fusion is WAY over your head right now. Feel free to listen to it, though. His stuff after A Go Go is kind of in a similar vein, but some of it can be a bit advanced, so just stick with learning stuff from A Go Go for now.

You could also check out Pat Metheny's album Bright Size Life, since there's some good stuff in there that shouldn't be too hard to figure out. As a plus, it has Jaco on bass. You can find transcriptions of his solo from the title track just about anywhere on the Internet, including here, although it's in tab form, and tabs are a no-no in jazz.