#1
So if i had an e then played a b a few octaves apart from it would it still just be termed a perfect fifth or would you add the word octave in there?
#2
just quoting wikipedia

"Intervals larger than an octave are called compound intervals; for example, a tenth is known as a compound third.[3] The quality of the compound interval is determined by the quality of the interval on which it is based. For example, a perfect eleventh is the same as a compound perfect fourth.

Intervals larger than a thirteenth seldom need to be spoken of, most often being referred to by their compound names, for example "two octaves plus a fifth"[4] rather than "a 19th"."
#3
It'd be a perfect fifth. Only when you begin talking about tensions do you use intervals greater than 8 (9ths, 11ths, and 13ths).
WHY IS EVERYONE IN THE PIT A FUCKING METALCORE KID
#4
It's a compound interval, just add 7 for every extra octave. So perfect 5th + octave = perfect 12th.
#5
Quote by pwrmax
It's a compound interval, just add 7 for every extra octave. So perfect 5th + octave = perfect 12th.


so for another octave gap would it be a perfect 19th?!?
#6
Quote by Metallicker.
so for another octave gap would it be a perfect 19th?!?


Yes. But in a harmonic context, it is still the fifth.
#7
Quote by isaac_bandits
Yes. But in a harmonic context, it is still the fifth.


but what im trying to get at, is if you were expaining the interval to someone would you say a 19th?
#8
Quote by Metallicker.
but what im trying to get at, is if you were expaining the interval to someone would you say a 19th?


No. You could say 5th plus 2 octaves. But usually when you see intervals that big, their written in notation. You dont really talk about them ever
#9
Quote by tubatom868686
No. You could say 5th plus 2 octaves. But usually when you see intervals that big, their written in notation. You dont really talk about them ever

My theory prof refers to compound intervals as 12th, 10ths etc all the time.