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#1
what scale should i try to solo over it in???

im playing G#, Eb, E, C#, B, A#

and my main breakdown just consist of powerchords following along... G#, E, B, A#

i've tried Ab harmonic minor as it contains a good all the notes...but it don't sound right ....is there any other scale that may be appropriate????
#4
Actually, after playing the progression, I'd say its in G#minor.
The key is G#minor, and play G#minor for the scale.
#5
E--------------------------------------4---
B---------------------------------5-8--
G-------------------------4-6-8
D-----------------5-6-8----
A---------4-6-7-------
E-4-6-7--

is this the scale??? my scale book calls it G#/Ab harmonic minor...is that the same as G# minor...is the harmonic unnecessary?
#7
E--------------------------------------4---
B---------------------------------5-8--
G-------------------------4-6-8
D-----------------5-6-8----
A---------4-6-7-------
E-4-6-7-- is this the scale??? my scale book calls it G#/Ab harmonic minor...is that the same as G# minor...is the harmonic unnecessary?

No, harmonic minor is different from natural minor. Harmonic minor has a raised seventh for a leading tone. Don't even worry about harmonic or melodic minor until you have an absolutely sound knowledge of natural minor.

Natural minor scale has the formula 1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7, 8.
From this, one pattern off the fourth fret on guitar you get would be:
E-----------------------------------------------------4--6--7---
B-------------------------------------------4--5--7------------
G--------------------------------3--4--6-----------------------
D------------------------4--6-----------------------------------
A-------------4--6--7-------------------------------------------
E--4--6--7------------------------------------------------------


B major and G# minor are the same thing so play a G#minor pentatonic, B major scale

They are not the same thing. B major means the tonal centre is B. G# minor means the tonal centre is G#.
#8
but G# pentatonic has a buncha different notes and really don't feel right...u sure?
#9
Quote by Jeradmang
but G# pentatonic has a buncha different notes and really don't feel right...u sure?



Make sure ur playing a minor pentatonic not major
#10
ok so G#/Ab natural minor makes sense but in my scale book is a little diff from what you tabbed....they have it like this

E------------------------------------4
B-------------------------------5-7-
G-----------------------4-6-8
D---------------4-6-8
A--------4-6-7
E-4-6-7
#11
E----------------------------4-7
B-----------------------4-7
G------------------4-6
D-------------4-6
A--------4-6
E---4-7

pentatonic G#/Ab right?
#13
I would touch up on theory before trying to give advice Hendrallica. You're looking at them as shapes. For example, If a piece is in C major, even if you play the Am shape, It is in C major because it resolves to the Cmaj. Shapes don't make a difference.

Edit: To ts, use chord tones and it will sound fine. If you don't know what that is, look up some lessons on this site. Or use the notes you are using in the song, don't rely on shapes.
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#14
ok so G#/Ab natural minor makes sense but in my scale book is a little diff from what you tabbed....they have it like this
E------------------------------------4
B-------------------------------5-7-
G-----------------------4-6-8
D---------------4-6-8
A--------4-6-7
E-4-6-7



Same thing, I just moved up some of those notes on theirs to the next string, because it's just more comfortable to me.

I'd recommend learning the intervals between the minor scale, learning the fretboard and by using that learning how to play the minor scale all over the fretboard. Same with major and minor/major pentatonics.
Last edited by KillahSquirrel at Aug 26, 2009,
#15
Quote by Emo-Slayer
I would touch up on theory before trying to give advice Hendrallica. You're looking at them as shapes. For example, If a piece is in C major, even if you play the Am shape, It is in C major because it resolves to the Cmaj. Shapes don't make a difference.


Well yeah I know but the notes in the two keys are the same so if you want to solo over it it gets way too repetitive so using scales from Both keeps it interesting...but I see what ur saying the way I worded it just wasn't perfect
#17
Quote by KillahSquirrel
^You can't use both. It's one or the other.



Not true...I'm saying I worded it wrong. It is in the key of G#minor but playing B major scales over it does work. Play an Am Pentatonic over a Cmajor chord and tell me how it sounds
#18
Yes but, you can't use the major and minor pentatonic. If the song is in (for example) A minor you are using the notes from A minor. It's not multiple scales. Sure you could use the "harmonic minor" but it's not a different scale either. It's just A minor with accidentals in this case.

Edit:
Quote by Hendrallica
Not true...I'm saying I worded it wrong. It is in the key of G#minor but playing B major scales over it does work. Play an Am Pentatonic over a Cmajor chord and tell me how it sounds


You are thinking in shapes. DON'T. If you are playing in C major, even if you play Am pentatonic over it, it is Just Cmajor. They are the same notes. Not to be an ass, but you are wrong. Try and understand what we are saying.
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#19
Playing Am pentatonic over a C major chord sounds like C major pentatonic. That's because it is C major pentatonic
Same with playing G#minor over B major. You can't play relative minor/major over something. It just doesn't work like that.
#20
I see what ur saying though, like the I, IV, and V are major inthe key of G#maj so if you look at B major, the III, VI and VII are major
#21
I use "the gig bag book of scales" it seems pretty accurate...

i've been trying to learn intervals, i just now understood what this old man told me about "almost all the strings are tuned fourths apart" so the interval would be.....

WHWWHWW for the natural minor...which i guess i need to just sit and do the math as i call it and figure out how to quickly relate that to the fact strings are tuned fourths apart correct???
#24
YOU ARE NOT PLAYING G#MINOR PENTATONIC THOUGH. IT IS BMAJOR. THEY ARE THE SAME NOTES, AND IT RESOLVES TO BMAJOR, THEREFORE IT IS BMAJOR. IN NO SUCH WAY IS IT G#.


Read this over and over.
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#25
Quote by Emo-Slayer
Read edit. ^

To hendrallica.



You've been misunderstanding everything I've said...the major scale contains all the notes in the relative minor scale...I never argued against that
#26
so what emo slayer is saying is even though it is the same shape...and contains the same notes but can be Gminor or Bmajor depending on what you are playing to decides what it is called...by itself it could be called either but with a Bmajor chord it has to be called bmajor to technically be right...and resolve it to B instead of G#?
#27
Exactly. So if a song resolves to the major. You can't play the relative minor scale. They are the same notes, and you would be playing the major even though your ending note might be on the vi.

Edit:
Quote by Jeradmang
so what emo slayer is saying is even though it is the same shape...and contains the same notes but can be Gminor or Bmajor depending on what you are playing to decides what it is called...by itself it could be called either but with a Bmajor chord it has to be called bmajor to technically be right...and resolve it to B instead of G#?


Yes. If a song resolves to B major, theoretically it's not G# minor at all. It is B major in that context.
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#28
Dammit again ur arguing points that I'm not making!!! I know it is in B Major if the progression resolves to that as the I chord...all I was saying is they have the same ****ing notes in them!
#29
Hendrallica no worries man...im with you on that, the name don't really matter to me its the sound and all the stuff thats in the middle...but i appreciate what slayer says too cause it makes me think politically correct...and that is good for the musical mind

i completely understand you and don't feel like you are an idiot, you definitely know me than me...and what you said is right...to the wrong minded person! haha
Last edited by Jeradmang at Aug 26, 2009,
#30
No. You were saying that if a song is in the major to play the relative minor scale. I was just trying to tell you that you might be starting on a different fret, but it is still the major. No need to get your panties in a bunch.
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#31
Dammit again ur arguing points that I'm not making!!! I know it is in B Major if the progression resolves to that as the I chord...all I was saying is they have the same ****ing notes in them!


But you can't play G# minor over B major, or vice versa. You claimed that you could, and you also said that playing both would make it less boring, which is clearly not the case.

The best way to picture it is on a piano, say in the key of C maj for simplicity. Play ANY of the white keys, and theyre in key; you're playing C maj. There's no possible way to play anything else with just the white keys.

Of course, this isn't overly a big deal, since it's still diatonically correct; the problem surfaces when people start thinking theyre playing something different. You hear what you want to hear, I guess.
Last edited by KillahSquirrel at Aug 26, 2009,
#32
Well you could play Aminor. :p But he will probably see your point.

Edit: AS to not confuse, you could only play Aminor if it resolved to A minor though
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#33
well says G#minor and BMaj have the same notes...ok...i dont even know for sure but just say....

you got both your scales....now the chord is Bmaj definitely but you play your G#minor and find the B note and use that as the root and resolve back to that...would that work?
#34
well says G#minor and BMaj have the same notes...ok...i dont even know for sure but just say.... you got both your scales....now the chord is Bmaj definitely but you play your G#minor and find the B note and use that as the root and resolve back to that...would that work?


Not really, because they are one and the same; they are parts of the same scale. Like I said, picture a piano, where they don't have these boxed in patterns.
#35
Quote by Jeradmang
well says G#minor and BMaj have the same notes...ok...i dont even know for sure but just say....

you got both your scales....now the chord is Bmaj definitely but you play your G#minor and find the B note and use that as the root and resolve back to that...would that work?


Yes. As long as it resolves to B major, you can play any notes of the scale, anywhere on the fretboard.

I'm just being theoretically correct about not playing the minor if it resolves to the major.

Edit: But technically you wouldn't be playing G# though.
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#36
haha slayer....that quote in your sig is frickin awesome...wow what a douche...like i barely know anything about music but that just seems like someone throwin a buncha mumbo jumbo out there and trying to sound smart...

damn i dont think sweeping really ever came into full swing till like the 80's??? i can't even think of any 70's stuff that definitely sounds swept??? can you guys name a song that may use sweeping from the 70's?

wow
#37
Jerry C maybe,I'm not sure when he first came around though. The guy in my sig actually knows his **** tho. He was messing with a guy who was pissing us off.

Edit: He was a troll though. We aren't mean to random people in MT.
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Last edited by Emo-Slayer at Aug 26, 2009,
#38
Jerry C??? who is that? Jerry Cantrell is only one who comes to mind when you say Jerry C...and i think he is way after 70's
#39
Quote by Jeradmang
Jerry C??? who is that? Jerry Cantrell is only one who comes to mind when you say Jerry C...and i think he is way after 70's


THE famous Canon Rock instrumental...he was the original
#40
Yea, the guy who plays canon rock. I'm not a big fan of sweeping anymore. I don't really know when it first came popular tbh.

Well actually, classical did it alot, and some jazz.
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