#1
I am new to guitar building, and was curious what exactly the purpose of having two different woods for the body of a guitar. I have noticed that many guitars will be made of lets say mahogany, and will have a a maple top of something like that. I was curious as to the purpose of using two different woods, and if it's something I should do for my first build.

I am very good with woodworking, and routing, sanding, cutting, etc etc etc won't be a problem for me. Also, if you could possibly recommend some good body woods to use for a nice warm tone, but will make a light guitar as well (I am doing a maple neck with a rosewood fingerboard), It'd help alot.
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#2
Usually guitars with a maple cap have a mahogany body, or a similar wood, so the maple top makes the guitar a little bit brighter. You can also get like, flamed maple tops to make the guitar look "better." Those are the two main reasons I know of. Looks and tonal changes.

If you want a nice warm tone, you would probably be looking at mahogany. It will be quite light too.
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#3
maple top adds more sustain as with the les pauls. It wouldn't be practical to make the whole body out of maple.
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#4
Quote by Artemis Entreri

If you want a nice warm tone, you would probably be looking at mahogany. It will be quite light too.


Who told you mahogany is light? It's not. In fact, it's one of the heaviest woods.

He's right on the warm tone from mahogany though.
#5
Well, Because its my first time building my own guitar, I'm probably going to get a body and neck off warmoth, then do custom paint and wiring and such. Anyway, when you design a guitar online it asks for a laminate and I really wasn't sure what that meant.
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#6
Quote by Vikingx
Who told you mahogany is light? It's not. In fact, it's one of the heaviest woods.

He's right on the warm tone from mahogany though.



actually yeah, you're right. My bad. I don't know what made me think it was light.
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#7
yeah it really depends on the body shape of the guitar

if its a les paul body then yeah mahogony will give it that nice warmth

but for other strat or ibanez bodies lets say they usually use alder

and basswood is considered cheaper wood
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#9
Quote by glam rocker
yeah it really depends on the body shape of the guitar

if its a les paul body then yeah mahogony will give it that nice warmth

but for other strat or ibanez bodies lets say they usually use alder

and basswood is considered cheaper wood


uhh, the shape of the body doesnt affect tone (on electric guitars)

however the size of the body, and amount of wood involved, and the thickness will.

that being said, a you can make ANY shape, do ANYTHING.

the shape is more what you like than anything... it wont affect tone
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