#2
there is a section on this under the lessons tab at the top of the page...not exactly sure where but its really helpful and easy to follow...probably better than anything someone will explain to you on a message board

edit...i found it for you...what a gentleman i am

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/the_circle_of_fifths_explained.html
Last edited by Jeradmang at Aug 27, 2009,
#3
How much theory do you know? If it's little then you need to learn some more basic stuff first.
#5
hope it did and no problem man, just when you figure it out promise you will teach me a little better hahaha!
#6
I never learned it. My music theory teacher just forced us to learn all the sharps and flats in every major key and then learn the relative minors
I smile because I have no idea whats goin on
#7
Quote by pwrmax
How much theory do you know? If it's little then you need to learn some more basic stuff first.


Thats the most basic thing there is

To TS. Its a tool used to determine how many flats/sharps are in each key. Other that it has little to no purpose
#8
Quote by tubatom868686
Thats the most basic thing there is

To TS. Its a tool used to determine how many flats/sharps are in each key. Other that it has little to no purpose


It does have purpose - it is the definition of semitones in western music. The octave is a doubling of frequency, the 5th is a tripling. It's from this that the semitone divide is defined. It is all the notes which occur by generating 5ths from a given note. It has little USE but much purpose.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#9
Quote by tubatom868686
Thats the most basic thing there is

To TS. Its a tool used to determine how many flats/sharps are in each key. Other that it has little to no purpose



...No it can help with common chord progressions, transposing, chords in the key, relative minors and many other uses.



Take any note (or chord) on the circle the one to the left of it is the subdominant the one to the right is the dominant I IV V progression.

This isnt politically correct but think of this as a husband (dominant) and wife (subdominant) driving home in key of C.

C is home
G is husband
F is wife

The wife drives her car and normally finds her way back home. Usually.

The husband drives his car and always finds his way home.

If the wife cannot find her way home, she will meet her husband then go back home I goes to iv then v.

You can instantly tell what the three major chords are in any key because they are next to each other in the circle (F C and G for example in key of C)

On the co5 the relative minor is always at a 90 degree angle or 3oclock (if you move the circle so the tonic is at 12 oclock). Using the above husband analogy the relatives live just around the corner! The relatives are also picked up by the husband lol. Also the one to the right and the left of the relative minor are also minor

Co5 is a way of not having to worry so much about scale degrees, steps chords progressions etc because its all in there.
Last edited by Metallicker. at Aug 27, 2009,
#10
also im taking A.P. theory this year and on the first day our student teacher taught us a method of remembering how many sharps or flats are in a key, and it helps me alot.

in the major scale there are 7 notes, the magic number is 7 so when you want to find out how many sharps are in a scale think about how many flats are in its flat scale (sounds stupid but hang on)

F major has 1 flat (Bb) so F# major has 6 sharps
C major has no sharps and no flats so C# major has 7 sharps
G major has 1 sharp so Gb major has 6 flats.
and that works for ever scale in the major scale

i hope that helps it helps me
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#13
This isn't conventional, but I use it for intervals. In a syntonic tuning system (like 12-edo for example), any major or augmented interval can be constructed as a chain of ascending fifths, and any minor or diminished interval can be constructed as a chain of ascending fourths (descending fifths).
#14
I don't use it at all, personally. It doesn't make anything more convenient for me.

EDIT: I agree with the post directly below me.
Last edited by Eastwinn at Aug 28, 2009,
#15
Quote by Metallicker.

C is home
G is husband
F is wife

The wife drives her car and normally finds her way back home. Usually.

The husband drives his car and always finds his way home.


wtf