#1
if i were going to play guitar in college (most likely jazz), what could i expect from them and what would they expect from me? of course this varies for each college, but i'm talking in general. i prefer to play a mix of blues, rock, funk, and maybe a touch of jazz, but if i feel like i would get laughed away with hendrix style music. also, how intense music theory knowledge would they expect me to know to get into the music programs?
#2
You would more likely than not become part of a jazz ensemble, in which case you would play rhythm and the occasional solo.
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#3
They probably only have jazz ensembles in which you can play guitar
I guess its possible the symphonic band or something might want a guitarist for a song or two but I doubt they'd want a full time classical guitarist

For the jazz ensemble you'd need to be able to comp proficiently and read music
You should be good at improvising too, but in a big band its not the most important thing
In a small jazz combo, however, your improvising ability is extremely important

Also, jazz takes a LOT of knowledge of music theory

If you haven't played jazz before you'll be at a huge disadvantage compared to guitarists who played in their high school's big band

EDIT
I'm only talking about the bands directed by the school itself, of course
Also, the level of competition varies by which school you go to
Last edited by The Horror! at Aug 27, 2009,
#4
Be able to improv, know a lot of chord theory, be able to play in ugly keys.
#5
Buy a real book. Sightread lots of the pages at tempo. If you can't do that well (and by well, i mean comp good with good voice leading, swing, time, etc.) for 90%+ of the time then you're probably not good enough.
#6
Yeah I considered this, from the responses, I don't think i'm even near proficient...haha.
#7
If you're asking a forum, then I'd guess you are not good enough yet.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#8
Jazz is hard for rhythm players. One guy who joined jazz ensemble last year can play any Dream Theater song on guitar AND drums, he tried both instruments in jazz and he was mediocre at both. Now he's sticking with drums ... and the onus is on me to push him if he's slowing down.
#9
Quote by troyponce
If you're asking a forum, then I'd guess you are not good enough yet.
Why is that?
#10
Quote by rockinrider55
Why is that?



Without self confidence, your playing suffers.

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#11
Quote by rockinrider55
Why is that?

It is difficult to get in to music school. If you're asking people on a forum if they think you have what it takes, then you don't know what the standard is and aren't going to have put in the proper work yet. If they posted their audition tapes and asked if it was up to par, that would be another story, but this seems like a no brainer.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#12
Quote by troyponce
It is difficult to get in to music school. If you're asking people on a forum if they think you have what it takes, then you don't know what the standard is and aren't going to have put in the proper work yet. If they posted their audition tapes and asked if it was up to par, that would be another story, but this seems like a no brainer.
Well if you don't know anyone who has taken an audition for a music school then how are you supposed to know what is needed to get accepted. Yes they have requirements on their websites and such but usually they are very generic.

I know a lot of players who make it into state university music programs with not as much playing ability/experience as one would think is needed. I wouldn't say it's that difficult to get into a music school either. For most of the regular universities and big music schools like Berklee you only need your playing skill, a little bit of sight reading, and a small amount of basic scale/chord knowledge.
#13
i love how cocky some of the jazz heads are on this forum.

You go to college to learn, and the school will recognize that. you dont have to be a superb player because theyll teach you, thats what theyre there for. Dont worry how advanced your peers are.

Although it wouldnt hurt to brush up on your theory heh

There are contemporary schools that delve into rock blues and even pop. But i wouldnt recommend going to college for any of those, because all the information for those genres is pretty accessible over the internet, while jazz is a different story which can take years and years of practice.
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#14
Quote by BBell
i love how cocky some of the jazz heads are on this forum.

You go to college to learn, and the school will recognize that. you dont have to be a superb player because theyll teach you, thats what theyre there for. Dont worry how advanced your peers are.

Although it wouldnt hurt to brush up on your theory heh

There are contemporary schools that delve into rock blues and even pop. But i wouldnt recommend going to college for any of those, because all the information for those genres is pretty accessible over the internet, while jazz is a different story which can take years and years of practice.

They don't allow beginners in, at least not at my school.
#15
Quote by rockinrider55
Well if you don't know anyone who has taken an audition for a music school then how are you supposed to know what is needed to get accepted. Yes they have requirements on their websites and such but usually they are very generic.

I know a lot of players who make it into state university music programs with not as much playing ability/experience as one would think is needed. I wouldn't say it's that difficult to get into a music school either. For most of the regular universities and big music schools like Berklee you only need your playing skill, a little bit of sight reading, and a small amount of basic scale/chord knowledge.

Berklee is a bad example to use. I know several people who have applied there, all of them were accepted. When people ask about music school, I assume they mean something like Depaul or Lawrence. Once again, I think this comes back to the 'talking about it on a forum' issue. Kids online care about going to GIT or Berklee instead of finding where they will get the best education, which skews the balance. Berklee takes people who pay tuition. UMass or U of I (good state schools with solid music programs) will reject talented and dedicated musicians who simply aren't at a high enough level yet.

to Bbell: If you were referring to me, I'm not a jazz head by any means. Just trying to be honest about the realities of music school, knowing full well the caliber of people who make it and those who don't. In the interest of full disclosure, I know am one of the people who would not make the cut.
Quote by nightwind
You must never double the leading tone ever. Failure to comply will result in a fugue related death.
#16
Well he didn't mention anything about classical it obviously won't be one of the big classical conservatories or the older private universities. Most of those require a few repertoire pieces from different time periods and you'll be playing some parts out of bachs lute suites and one of the villa lobos etudes.

Then he mentioned he has only played a bit of jazz so that is probably throwing out the good jazz centered schools.

USC has a popular music program that could look into (probably so do a few other colleges). But other than that it sounds like you're pretty limited to a state college or like berklee (keep in mind they accept loads of players, but the first two years supposedly weed out a lot of the people who aren't committed)
#18
id say learn to read, then get a copy of the real book, the charlie parker omnibook and a book called jazz conception. learn drop 2 voicings, shell voicings, and how to apply various extensions to chords and brush up on your rootless chord voicings. shed all that stuff for a while and you'll be pretty solid if you have a decent foundation for jazz. if you dont theres a book called how to play jazz and improvise and rhythm section workout, both by jamey aebersold (whose entire very usefull catalogue can be easily torrented). eventually start to work on transcription and jam with others. eventually you will get good if you practice. check out individual schools faculty and level of students to gauge the quality of the program, not the acceptance (or rejection) rate. see the repetoire requirements they have (many great schools are very vague 'three tunes in contrasting styles' for example). also, big band and combo playing experience is invaluable and probobly the most important thing to have for a jazz player (the ability to play well with others).