#1
Hello!
I was concerned for this reason:
I like my dual rectifier and all, but i find it more suited for like drop d riffing and linkin park type numetal stuff. which is great but i find myself into more intricate rock/jazz fusion and just more sophisticated lead guitar stuff at the moment which is why i feel that i need a more smoother, rounded and focused tone for lead as opposed to the jagged bright and loose tone i am getting at the moment.

question, is there a pedal that i can get that will help me out, ie a compressor or a maximizer, i have heard of these being used for processing lead guitar sounds but i never ever really have been exposed to them and what they do etc. will this help?

or do i get a new head.... i mean its not out of the question i like the Drec but maybe its time for something new who knows
thanks!!!

-trauma
#2
I'm not the expert here so this is mainly a bump.

I've played the Dual Rec a few times and I can see what you are saying. Great amp don't get me wrong. I've used a MXR and Boss compressor and I can't really see how those would fix anything. Also, I've heard meh things about the Maximizor so ditto.

You can probably find an amp that will get you close the metal crunch tones you enjoy now plus give a more sophisticated lead tone.

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#3
I've heard some pretty great lead tones from a Dual Rec, a local dub-ish band uses them.
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#4
I own a Dual Rectifier and I can definitely agree that it's built more for numetal type tones. If you're looking for something a bit smoother but still want something aggressive, look at the Peavey 5150 series.
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#5
Rectifiers are ****. They sound awesome recorded for rhythm stuff but they dont cut through in a live mix and have NO versatility whatsoever. For Lead they're poop IMO.

I know a lot of people slate 5150's for not being versatile but my money goes with the Peavey EVERY time. I've owned 3 Recs and about 6 5150's and a couple of 6505's so I know what Im talkin about when it comes to comparisons between the two.

The best thing you could to to improve your lead sound on the Rec is get a Tube Screamer or Maxon equivelant. It'll smooth it out a fair bit and give it that little something extra in the upper mids, ideal for the singing solo thing your after.
#6
Quote by jscustomguitars
Rectifiers are ****. They sound awesome recorded for rhythm stuff but they dont cut through in a live mix and have NO versatility whatsoever. For Lead they're poop IMO.

I know a lot of people slate 5150's for not being versatile but my money goes with the Peavey EVERY time. I've owned 3 Recs and about 6 5150's and a couple of 6505's so I know what Im talkin about when it comes to comparisons between the two.

The best thing you could to to improve your lead sound on the Rec is get a Tube Screamer or Maxon equivelant. It'll smooth it out a fair bit and give it that little something extra in the upper mids, ideal for the singing solo thing your after.


Out of curiosity, have you tried the newer 5150 III's yet? I sold my original 5150 and I'm thinking of picking up the newer one, however it seems that not many people have tried them out yet.
1979 Gibson Les Paul Silverburst
James Tyler Variax JTV89
Schecter C1 Classic
Ibanez RG520QS
Greg Bennett Torino TR4

Mesa Boogie Dual Rectifier
GSP1101 & Pod X3 Pro
Peavey 5150 & JSX
Bugera 6262 & 333XL
Carvin V3
Spider Valve HD100
#7
Quote by trauma15
Hello!
I was concerned for this reason:
I like my dual rectifier and all, but i find it more suited for like drop d riffing and linkin park type numetal stuff. which is great but i find myself into more intricate rock/jazz fusion and just more sophisticated lead guitar stuff at the moment which is why i feel that i need a more smoother, rounded and focused tone for lead as opposed to the jagged bright and loose tone i am getting at the moment.

question, is there a pedal that i can get that will help me out, ie a compressor or a maximizer, i have heard of these being used for processing lead guitar sounds but i never ever really have been exposed to them and what they do etc. will this help?

or do i get a new head.... i mean its not out of the question i like the Drec but maybe its time for something new who knows
thanks!!!

-trauma
I think you might like a vintage Marshall style amp or even a BF Fender style amp.
#8
Quote by trauma15
Hello!
I was concerned for this reason:
I like my dual rectifier and all, but i find it more suited for like drop d riffing and linkin park type numetal stuff. which is great but i find myself into more intricate rock/jazz fusion and just more sophisticated lead guitar stuff at the moment which is why i feel that i need a more smoother, rounded and focused tone for lead as opposed to the jagged bright and loose tone i am getting at the moment.

question, is there a pedal that i can get that will help me out, ie a compressor or a maximizer, i have heard of these being used for processing lead guitar sounds but i never ever really have been exposed to them and what they do etc. will this help?

or do i get a new head.... i mean its not out of the question i like the Drec but maybe its time for something new who knows
thanks!!!

-trauma


If you're looking to stick with the Mesas, there are the Stilettos, Lonestar Classics, and Lonestar specials that have nice clean tones and some pretty good lead tones.

I've also tried out the Fultone Webb Viola, which has a vintage Marshall dirty sound and very very good cleans for a british voiced amp.

Also, what Jscustom suggested, add a tube screamer/driver of some sort infront of your dual rectifier or just get a Peavey 5150.
#9
on the recto...maybe dial a holdsworth type tone...like rolling the treble down, mids down to like 2-3 and bass half way? and gain where you would like it.

But if you into like allen hinds...electrodyne with a BB preamp.
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#10
Hmm....I own a Rectoverb, which is pretty much the same as a Dual Recto but with reverb and not a third channel, plus it's only a single pair of tubes. And you can get anything out of it no matter what you're looking for. Old-fashioned gain? Try the raw or pushed subchannels. Heck, the vintage subchannel can get a good Zeppelin sound on it if you roll back on the presence knob.
Like others have said, if you still decide on a new head, then do go for the Peavey 5150/6505 head. Excellent cleans yet ripping hi-gain. Jerry Cantrell of Alice in Chains uses one when not using his Bogners.
#11
Quote by EvilAngel93
Hmm....I own a Rectoverb, which is pretty much the same as a Dual Recto but with reverb and not a third channel, plus it's only a single pair of tubes. And you can get anything out of it no matter what you're looking for. Old-fashioned gain? Try the raw or pushed subchannels. Heck, the vintage subchannel can get a good Zeppelin sound on it if you roll back on the presence knob.
Like others have said, if you still decide on a new head, then do go for the Peavey 5150/6505 head. Excellent cleans yet ripping hi-gain. Jerry Cantrell of Alice in Chains uses one when not using his Bogners.


I don't think I'd call the cleans on a 6505 "excellent". Passable seems like a better word.
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