#1
Okay, this upcoming school year I'm playing stand-up bass in my school's band
so me not playing any instruments other than guitar and electric bass, would playing stand up bass just be like playing bass flipped up or is it an entirely different instrument and i'd have a difficult time learning it?

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#2
i play both and its not really that different

the harderst part is getting the bow right

but you should pick it up really easly
#3
It'll be similar to the bass, but there are no frets, so you have to imagine where the frets are supposed to be and put your finger there. Also, using the bow might be a little awkward at first. Other than that, it shouldn't be too hard. I know of people who switch from upright bass to bass guitar with little trouble, but I'm not sure if the reverse is true.
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#5
Well it depends how long you've played bass for. I'm sure somebody who's played for 10 years will find it easier than someone who's played for a few months.

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#6
Its really different. you use many different muscles and techniques playing the Double bass. It takes time and effort. The scale length is longer, and the different positions require different technique as you move down the fretboard. Its difficult ive been playing since april may now, and im still finding many things difficult. Also then theirs price of a decent double bass. Unless youre renting or can borrow one it will mean you need to buy one. Which is 1000 + for a beginner one and then a setup, although there are some very good schemes out there. Ie you can pay it off over 12 month sort of things.

I would find a really good teacher first. Go and talk to him or her and see what they say. Rent a double bass for a couple of months and take lessons and see how you find it.
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#7
mindset is the same, technique is different.
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#8
^Nick, I disagree to some extent. Your technique is going to be different, therefore you do have to have a different approach and mind set in your playing. I have to agree with Sam on this.

I play an unlined fretless and the first time I played an upright it was a completely different experience.
#10
I guess it will be fine if you get some practice in beforehand
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#11
Quote by anarkee
^Nick, I disagree to some extent. Your technique is going to be different, therefore you do have to have a different approach and mind set in your playing. I have to agree with Sam on this.

I play an unlined fretless and the first time I played an upright it was a completely different experience.

I don't think technique should ever effect mindset, besides, of course, the little effects, like arco, fretless slides, fuzz, or wah that allow you to do what you do in a different way.
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I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

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#13
Quote by anarkee
I think our definitions of mindset are not the same.

hmm.

mine is how you approach the instrument's role in in the music, such as being the primary melody, the beat, a secondary melody, or whatever.

what's yours?
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I wouldn't call what we have here on the Bass Forum a mentality. It's more like the sharing part of an AA meeting.

Quote by Jason Jillard
HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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#14
To me, mindset covers technique, approach to play and the musical sense in one package. Between upright and electric--there is a difference.
#16
The double bass really isn't as popular as a bass or guitar (Upright Bass Hero?) so you probably won't find as many people who you can play with or ask for help. It's also a lot bigger, and as I've heard, harder to play if you're short and/or have short arms.
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#17
I think i'm going to agree with tam on this one. With double bass you really have to play for the band more, milk the money position (first and half) with electric, although your still rhythm section you have a more dominant roll then double bass.

That's my opinion anyway
#18
I'm with Tams. The first and most important thing you have to do to be successful at upright bass, is forget everything you once thought about playing the electric. I see where Humanity is coming from in that musically it's similar, however, in all technical aspects of the instrument it's totally different. From hand position, to techniques, everything. It's going to be as difficult to learn Upright as any other instrument, but if you've played electric you'll at least have some of the basic musical concepts down. So my answer is, as long as you don't attempt to play it in any way shape or form like an electric, then you shouldn't have more trouble than any other instrument.
#19
I feel so alone...

in many jazz groups, an upright bass does take a solo. not as common, but, there aren't many upright bassists who have reached that point. same with flamenco, classical, it does melodies in rock-

it's not as common, but I think approaching the upright as a melody instrument is a really cool thing.

listen to Miles Mosley, some MMW, Reynaud Garcia Fons, Dragonetti- it takes much, much more skill and even just plain out hand size in some cases, but those artists have overcome technique to embrace using the bass as a melody. skill is a boundary of where your limits are, mindset is how you move within those limits.

I'm open for rebuttal- in the new forum plan- this could venture into spam territory quickly.

EDIT: TS, don't try to play it like an electric, you should be ok. like Jazzy (and everyone else) said.
Quote by FatalGear41
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HUMANITY WHATS WRONG WITH YOU.


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http://www.myspace.com/rustingbloom
Last edited by the humanity at Aug 30, 2009,
#20
The most important thing about jazz upright is a punchy attack and playing the root on one. Start there I guess
#21
You better hope it's easy bass music. I've been playing upright for years now and I can't even play some of my schools band music without help from a professional. I'd say get a local who knows what they're doing and ask for lessons. The double-bass is far more difficult than the electric unless your doing like insane br00tal deathcore metal that has an absolutely mind-blowing bass part. There are many bad habits you can make with a double-bass so watch out for.

-wrong bow position (this is a B*TCH to get rid of so for your sake learn correct bow position first off)
-Hand position on the fingerboard, that's not as bad but it really is a pain in the ass to have, and makes it harder to play.

There's more but I think those 2 are really the biggest ones. Try your best, it really isn't easy.
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