#1
Im trying to write more and more songs, but i keep falling into these tacky chord progressions. what are your guy's fav progressions?

So far, mine is a I, III, VI7 in aolean.

Why are progressions that follow triad formulas always the best?! like the progression above? as the roots of the chords insist A-C-F which is an F major triad at the 2nd inversion.
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#2
Quote by xFinnellx
Why are progressions that follow triad formulas always the best?! like the progression above? as the roots of the chords insist A-C-F which is an F major triad at the 2nd inversion.


I'd say that's because with only three chords you're going to be playing the tonic chord (that is, the I chord) for two bars which strongly establishes the tonal center for the other two chords to develop. If the tonic chord is only played for one measure the tonal center would be less obvious and the development might just turn into senseless meandering progressions; if played for more it would sound boring. All this applies to progressions that are only four measures long.

Establishing a strong tonal center, being able to develop it, and knowing how to set up cadences are three very important things in chord progression. And I suspect that one's ear is at least as important as a solid base in music theory when it comes to mastering progressions.

J.
#3
Quote by Sewe Dae
I'd say that's because with only three chords you're going to be playing the tonic chord (that is, the I chord) for two bars which strongly establishes the tonal center for the other two chords to develop. If the tonic chord is only played for one measure the tonal center would be less obvious and the development might just turn into senseless meandering progressions; if played for more it would sound boring. All this applies to progressions that are only four measures long.

Establishing a strong tonal center, being able to develop it, and knowing how to set up cadences are three very important things in chord progression. And I suspect that one's ear is at least as important as a solid base in music theory when it comes to mastering progressions.

J.


but also, in this progression, the last 2 measures of the four are designated for the VI chord. but i for got to mention that the VI chord is a VIsuspended
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#4
Probably going off topic, but as I thought about this it came to me that this chord progression might possibly imply a different key.

In D Aeolian it would be: Dm - F - Bbsus.

But because the Bbsus is repeated for two bars it might actually come across as a Bb major key using the progression iii - V - I.

Don't really know though. Is there any way to verify this?
Last edited by Sewe Dae at Aug 29, 2009,
#6
damn im kinda of an idiot. ACTUAL PROGRESSION!

Gmin7- Bbmaj-D#/A#sus

(im playing this in CGCFAD)
gmin7 for 1 bar, Bbmaj for 1 bar, sus for 2 bars

im pretty sure its in Gminor (or any one of those relating modes)
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#7
instead of looking at what you're playing you might want to look at how you're playing them. there are literally thousands of songs that use the same progressions. obviously you're gonna want to change up the progression up, but also try changing the strum patterns, the tempo, inversions, dynamic, where you play the chords on the neck, whether you arpeggiate the chords or strum them, etc...