#1
Yeah, I just bought a strat a couple of weeks ago, and it goes outta tune all the time

What is there a way to fix this?
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#2
replace the bridge (by a non tremolo), use locking tuners or place a locking nut, that should do the trick, if you don't want to mod your guitar, then just keep retuning it
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#3
Yeah i know they go out of tune fast, but this one goes out of tune if i as much as bend a string
#4
Re-slot the nut (probably strings catching in there) with a file
Stretch your strings
Learn how to string it up in a proper way ( = not too many windings etc) check google on this

Most of the people here will tell you to buy decent (locking!) tuners,
but you can go a long way by just winding it up properly.
#5
yeah same thing happend with me, if think it's normal with new guitars but do what the guy above me said
#6
Quote by dogmax
Yeah i know they go out of tune fast, but this one goes out of tune if i as much as bend a string



Change your strings, and make sure each string goes around the machine head ike 5 times. Also put graphite (pencil shaving stuff) in the gaps of the guitar nut - that helps a bit.
#8
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
Re-slot the nut (probably strings catching in there) with a file
Stretch your strings
Learn how to string it up in a proper way ( = not too many windings etc) check google on this

Most of the people here will tell you to buy decent (locking!) tuners,
but you can go a long way by just winding it up properly.

this!

i'd advice taking it to a guitar tech if you haven't worked on a nut before but often the nut is the main culprit for tuning problems, though very few people seem to realise that.
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#9
Quote by The Chimney Man
Change your strings, and make sure each string goes around the machine head ike 5 times. Also put graphite (pencil shaving stuff) in the gaps of the guitar nut - that helps a bit.


No way Jose

Less winding equals better tuning

The trick is to let the string lock itself in (again ... google)
#10
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
No way Jose

Less winding equals better tuning

The trick is to let the string lock itself in (again ... google)

Well, that's not true either, but there's a middle way and 5 is way too much. Try 2.

You do this like this: Kink the string slightly about 2 finger-widths from the peg, and use that kink as a start for the winding. You should end up with about two.
#11
Quote by Dunkelheit-164
No way Jose

Less winding equals better tuning

The trick is to let the string lock itself in (again ... google)


Depends on the guitar, really. If there's no string trees, sometimes you need a few more wraps for a sufficient string angle over the nut or you'll get buzz at the nut. The important thing is to not have overlapping windings.

dogmax is it going sharp or flat? If the strings are going sharp, chances are they are binding in the nut so as said earlier you need to lightly sand the slots to make sure they are smooth. If they are going flat, it's likely that you haven't got the strings stretched in yet (as long as they are wound on the posts properly).

Could be other things, but these are the common problems.
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#12
GHS makes white liquid graphite that can be put on to all the contact points of the strings. This stuff is about 7 dollars and it works!
#13
is it a fender strat? they usually keep in tune well. if it's a cheaper copy then that might be something to do with it. also, as said above, don't overdo the windings around the pegs, i usually aim for 3.
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