#1
We had a gig last week.
It was KICKASS.
I nailed every solo, every riff DEAD ON.
Even the Videos were killer. Possibly my best gig to date.

But yesterday I tried to record our original songs.

I COULDN'T EVEN KEEP RHYTHM WITH A METRONOME.

I was (and still am) in a state of shock, that my very foundation is in a bad shape.
I can't believe I played so well on stage. Is it that somehow on stage this gets masked?
But even in the practice room we sound damn good, if I made these kind of timing/rhythm errors, SOMEONE in the band would have noticed...

Why did I sound so terrible with a metronome on record?

Can someone help me remedy this?

Thanks
Srinivas
#2
hmmm, are you recording with only a metronome? Or did you have recordings of drums etc as references?
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#3
i think a lot of people find recording a lot harder because its hard to play to a click track... with a full band its a different enviroment and it makes it easier... also people can subconsciously slow down a little or speed up a tiny bit depending on the feel of it... which makes it easier to sound tight even if you're not playing at a steady bpm...


nothing you can except practice dude, don't let it get to you and don't stress out... just play the riffs over and over to a metronome till you can do it perfect every time...
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#4
Normally the drummer will put their part down first, so you have a reference. Some riffs are really hard to a play to a click cause you normally just time them by "feel"
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#5
Is your metronome a digital clicky beepy one, or is it one with a pendulum?

I find the pendulum ones easier to keep time with: when it's just a digital click or beep I feel a bit left in the dark between beats, whereas with the pendulum one I can watch it swing and feel when the beat is about to arrive.

You might find something similar is going on when you play live (you can watch your bandmates grooving along, you can see the rise and fall of the drummer's sticks, etc) -- there's visual feedback, which helps to keep you from getting disoriented between beats.
#6
Quote by ascend
Is your metronome a digital clicky beepy one, or is it one with a pendulum?

I find the pendulum ones easier to keep time with: when it's just a digital click or beep I feel a bit left in the dark between beats, whereas with the pendulum one I can watch it swing and feel when the beat is about to arrive.


Good advice, but that is not always appropriate for recording - the click from the metronome would also be recorded if you are mic-ing an amp.

If you're drastically out of time, I'd assume that you were out of time on stage too. The only thing you can do is continue practicing.
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#7
Practice, pay attention, listen hard. When you're with a band the drummer and other musicians can adjust for your mistakes. A metronome can't and won't. It's pretty shocking the first time but if you put in the work you'll be beastly tight and proud of your progress.
#8
Thank you so much guys, for the advice...I watched my videos again, and it was REALLY tight. somehow it's a lot tougher to play with a click track. So is it only practice? Or are there any other nuances that need to be worked on first?
#9
I always play better when nobody is watching and when I'm NOT trying to record myself. When I want to play something for somebody, it's always worse than when I'm playing it by myself. When I try to record something, I ALWAYS mess up the first couple of times, because I pressure myself to do it well. I do not have this in my band, because there is no real "pressure" on you, because we're just making music with each other. On stage I don't have this either, probably because I'm not playing for just one person and I can't see half the crowd anyway..
#11
I'm still wondering, are you literally just laying down your part with nothing but a click track recorded first? Cause, unless your doing a really simple song thats gonna be hard. Thats not how its normally done professionaly
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#12
Yes, I'm just playing guitar to aclick track. The song isn't simple, but it's not tough either. A very Judas Priest like groove with accents played with a slightly off-beat feel, like, exactly between 2 metronome clicks.
#13
Quote by TubeAmp89
Thank you so much guys, for the advice...I watched my videos again, and it was REALLY tight. somehow it's a lot tougher to play with a click track. So is it only practice? Or are there any other nuances that need to be worked on first?


Again - live musicians can cover each others mistakes and adjust. There's also the simple possibility that you aren't actually that good at perceiving "tightness" and it's an ego thing - don't get me wrong, a click track doesn't provide groove or accent the 2 and 4 like a drummer - but it's the only infallible part of this equation.

And yes, it's basically just practice.
#15
Why are you recording to JUST a click track? You should already have the drums, bass and other guitar (if you have one and that helps) recorded and you can play to that.
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#16
yeah, but someone's gotta play with only the click track I guess, normally this task is easier for the drummer. There may be the odd situation where you lay down the guitars first, such as the drummer not being available for the sessio etc.
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#17
Quote by TubeAmp89
Hey, instead of using a click track, if I use a drum loop, will it work?


Yep, this is what I do, cause I have trouble with click tracks. Just lay down a basic four bar drum track in midi at the tempo you want, loop it for aaages (to give you time to get settled at your guitar after hitting record on the computer), and then record along to that.

If you make the midi loop long enough you can potentially even record a bunch of takes in one long go (without getting up and down in between) and chop out the crap later.