#1
Okay, so I know the scale boxes for pent. minor in the key of A. I was wondering if anyone could give some tips on learning how to use them in different keys so I could change key halfway through a solo and know what notes to use.
#2
Don't think of the boxes, just think of the sound you want to achieve - at the end of the day there's only 5 notes there, they just repeating. Where you play them is little more than a matter of convenience.

If you want to play in a different key then just transpose the pattern accordingly, but you wouldn't ordinarily change key mid-solo, you should continue to follow the backing. YOu'd only change the scale you were soloing in if the song itself likewise changed key.
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#3
Just change the root note to the key you want to play in and go from there
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#4
Quote by steven seagull
Don't think of the boxes, just think of the sound you want to achieve - at the end of the day there's only 5 notes there, they just repeating. Where you play them is little more than a matter of convenience.

If you want to play in a different key then just transpose the pattern accordingly, but you wouldn't ordinarily change key mid-solo, you should continue to follow the backing. YOu'd only change the scale you were soloing in if the song itself likewise changed key.


Yeah I mean, if the backing chords changed and I was improvising then I don't exactly want to learn the pentatonic minor in 12 different keys. I just thought that if I could transpose the boxes into another key then it'd be alot easier to solo and such on the spot.
#5

then that would still be "learning the pentatonic minor in 12 different keys"
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#6
Quote by steven seagull

then that would still be "learning the pentatonic minor in 12 different keys"


No because I wouldn't have to know the notes of the pentatonic minor in 12 different keys off by head. I'm assuming the scales patterns are still the same regardless of the key. If that was so I'd be able to change key alot easier than memorising the notes in every key.
#7
Part of learning the pentatonic shapes is learning where the roots, fifths, thirds, etc. are in the box shapes, for major and minor pentatonic shapes.

The R's on the shape below correspond to the root and, therefore, the key of the scale. Thus if you move the shape up or down the fretboard you change the key accordingly.

 Minor pentatonic pattern
|-R-|---|---|-o-|
|-o-|---|---|-o-|
|-o-|---|-o-|---|
|-o-|---|-R-|---|
|-o-|---|-o-|---|
|-R-|---|---|-o-|


Hope that helps.
#8
Quote by Sewe Dae
Part of learning the pentatonic shapes is learning where the roots, fifths, thirds, etc. are in the box shapes, for major and minor pentatonic shapes.

The R's on the shape below correspond to the root and, therefore, the key of the scale. Thus if you move the shape up or down the fretboard you change the key accordingly.

 Minor pentatonic pattern
|-R-|---|---|-o-|
|-o-|---|---|-o-|
|-o-|---|-o-|---|
|-o-|---|-R-|---|
|-o-|---|-o-|---|
|-R-|---|---|-o-|


Hope that helps.


Say the root was A. I shift that pattern up a tone and the root is G. However then I'd be confined to that box because I wouldn't know the other patterns that allow you to move up and down the fretboard while still maintaining the same key.
#9
You'll shift the pattern DOWN a tone to get to G (thus the root goes from 5th fret to 3rd fret), and all the other patterns move along with it.

The pentatonic box shapes fit nicely next to one another in a series. In the OP you said you know all the scale boxes in A minor; so now you're moving everything down two frets to make the key G minor.

That make sense?
#10
Quote by Sewe Dae
You'll shift the pattern DOWN a tone to get to G (thus the root goes from 5th fret to 3rd fret), and all the other patterns move along with it.

The pentatonic box shapes fit nicely next to one another in a series. In the OP you said you know all the scale boxes in A minor; so now you're moving everything down two frets to make the key G minor.

That make sense?


Oh. Yes that makes alot of sense actually.

Thank you!
#11
Quote by steven seagull
Don't think of the boxes, just think of the sound you want to achieve - at the end of the day there's only 5 notes there, they just repeating. Where you play them is little more than a matter of convenience.

If you want to play in a different key then just transpose the pattern accordingly.


which is easily done by playing the box shape from a different root note.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 29, 2009,