#1
Hi, I'm a complete beginner to the guitar world, and have managed to get myself a bit stuck. I bought a cheap guitar from a Charity Shop a few years ago - it was a spur of the moment purchase, and I didn't really know anything about the different types of guitar. It duly ended up under the bed for a couple of years, and now I've rediscovered it, and am determined to learn to play.

The problem is, I'm fairly certain that I bought a Classical Guitar. I have no interest in playing the types of music best suited to it, and I would ideally like to learn to play more popular rock/pop songs on it (i.e. Oasis, Coldplay, that sort of thing, at least to begin with). To make matters worse, the neck is too wide for my fairly small hands - fretting top and bottom strings is almost impossible. Also, three strings are nylon, and three are steel, which makes it sound unbalanced - the nylon strings are dull and muted, while the steel ones overpower them.

I really need some advice from more experienced players. Will I be able to play the style of music I want on the Classical guitar, or am I better off simply buying a regular acoustic? None of the chords sound right, most of which may be down to my poor playing, but I don't thing the different strings are helping either - or does the different style of guitar make things sound different? Is it worth simply replacing the strings with a compete set? I prefer the sound of steel, and the pain doesn't really bother me.

To make things even more complicated, money is very short. I can't afford to get proper lessons, but I should be able to teach myself the basics thanks to the internet. This means that buying a proper acoustic guitar, which I would do without hesitation if I could afford to, isn't as simple as it looks - at most, i will be able to spend about $100. If anyone thinks I will be able to get what I want to achieve from the Classical guitar, I would much rather persevere with that, at least for the time being. If it's a waste of time, though, then I'll have to spend the money. I'd really appreciate any recommendations, though.

Sorry for asking so many questions. Thanks in advance for your help, guys.
#2
you should probably save money and buy a guitar from the under 300 dollar guitar thread if you want to achieve your goals. you'll be much more satisfied and much more motivated after spending that much money.

the three strings you say are steel are really nylon. strings need to be replaced depending on how often you play and the acidity of your hands. the sounds that come out of a classical are definitely different from a steel string acoustic.
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#3
i'm 5'3" but i can play a classical neck just fine. it's all in knowing how and being used to playing - but then, you're new.

no, you can't play the music you want with a classical if you want a similar type of sound. you also can't put steel strings on a classical as the string tension is much greater and will soon damage the guitar. btw, if you use lighter steel strings, they won't hurt your fingers any more than nylon - we mostly use extra lights as we like the sound and feel.

check this out http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Rogue-Grand-Concert-Cutaway-AcousticElectric?sku=519196 - it's a REALLY cheap guitar that isn't as crappy as a first act or a mitchell. even comes with a padded gig bag. i have one of these that i use as a beater and it's surprisingly good considering. also as it's an acoustic electric, you could plug in and add effects if you wanted.
#4
I was forced to start off with a classical guitar myself, but I found it easier because of the nylon strings, which made it easier to hold down chords. However, if you really have tiny hands, I guess it's better to shift to an acoustic guitar with a smaller bridge.
#5
the classical shouldn't sound a lot different
you should be able to get at least some what the same
i don't find the classical that bad for changing chords
you just have to get used to it
#6
Quote by Xegewrath
I was forced to start off with a classical guitar myself, but I found it easier because of the nylon strings, which made it easier to hold down chords. However, if you really have tiny hands, I guess it's better to shift to an acoustic guitar with a smaller bridge.


i used to think nylon was easier on my fingers, but it turned out all the steel string guitars i played just had action that was too high. with extra lights and low action, steel is easier for me than nylon.

Quote by knightguy363
the classical shouldn't sound a lot different
you should be able to get at least some what the same
i don't find the classical that bad for changing chords
you just have to get used to it


it sounds very different to me.
#8
Those "steel strings" you're talking about are actually nylon wound with another metallic material. If you take one off and crack the bottom with some wire cutters you'll be able to unwind it.(if you're curious)


The neck is not too wide for you, you're just being a wuss! . With practice you'll get there. I play electric, steel string and nylon and the easiest to play by far is my classical. You'll get used to it.

It's logically going to sound different. These guitars are completely different. Different string material, different string tension, different bracing patterns, different overall construction, of course they aren't going to sound the same. But trust me, E major on the classical guitar will have the exact same notes and should sound frequency wise exactly the same as the steel string guitar.


I wouldn't by a new guitar just yet, learn to play on the nylon first and then move on.
#9
Thanks to everyone for all your help, I really appreciate it.

I'm going to stick with it, rather than buy a new guitar. I expected it to be difficult, it wasn't really that that was getting me down. It was more that I couldn't make anything sound the way it was supposed to, but now that I know it's going to be a little different, it's much more encouraging. The wider fretboard will help in the long run, I guess - if I can reach for chords on this, it should be a piece of cake on a regular acoustic. I'll learn the ropes with the classical, and hopefully move to a half decent steel string when I'm a little better.

Thanks for all the advice guys, it's really, really helpful.
#10
Go to a shop and ask them to teach you to string a classical guitar so you can bang on a new set of strings.
#11
it,like everything in music ,it takes time and patience to succeed,wehere it be re-stringging or to play that song you hear in your head, but always go after that sound you hear and never be afraid to try different instruments.......... good luck!!!