#1
Hey guys, I'm a bit confused on some chord progressions.
I understand that this progession works on any major key: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - vii(diminished, which I was told could be played as a minor?)

so for the C major scale, we would get this:

C - Dm - Em - F - G - Am - Bm

Now, what if a song is played in the key of Am? What pattern do I use? Do I use the same one as above? so that it becomes:

Am - Bm - Cm - D - E - Fm - Gm

Is that correct?

Also, is there any other chord progression pattern for a major key? Thanks a lot.
#2
Am is just the relative minor. You could start on any different chord you wanted.
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#3
Just work it out yourself.... Don't be using just tricks, they're just tools. Understand them.

Am scale: A-B-C-D-E-F-G

I = 1-3-5 = A-C-E = Am
II = 2-4-6 = B-D-F = Bdim
III = 3-5-7 = C-E-G = Cmaj
IV = 4-6-1 = D-F-A = Dm
V = 5-7-2 = E-G-B = Em
VI = 6-1-3 = F-A-D = Fmaj
VII = 7-2-4 = G-B-D = Gmaj

If you don't understand WHY for example B-D-F is Bdim, I suggest you either study some more or ask me (either here or PM) to explain.

This works for EVERY SINGLE key, now in your example you used Am which is the relative minor of C major, so that's easier since it will contain the same chords as C major. Try figuring it out for, for example, the key of Bb. If you have it done, post back here.

Good luck.
Last edited by KoenDercksen at Aug 29, 2009,
#4
those are not progressions exactly.. those would be better defined as the chords of the key. A chord progression is an arrangement of the chords of the key (eg. I - IV - V - IV)

the chords of a major scale would be written like you have above, for minor it would be i, iiº, III, iv, v, VI, VII. If you are in harmonic minor you would make the V chord major.

with the roman numerals, capitals = major chord (eg I, IV, V) and lower-case = minor chord
#5
it goes

i-iio-III-iv-v-VI-VII
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Last edited by selkies at Aug 29, 2009,
#7
the chords for the minor key would be exactly the same as the major key, except the V of the minor will be major... so
Am= Am, Bm, C, Dm, E, F, G
and u can also make E E7- the five can always be a dominant seventh
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#8
Quote by punkrock4all
the chords for the minor key would be exactly the same as the major key, except the V of the minor will be major... so
Am= Am, Bm, C, Dm, E, F, G
and u can also make E E7- the five can always be a dominant seventh


An E major chord does NOT fit into the Am scale. E major = E-G#-B

Do you see a G# ANYWHERE in the Am scale??? I don't.
#9
Quote by KoenDercksen
Just work it out yourself.... Don't be using just tricks, they're just tools. Understand them.

Am scale: A-B-C-D-E-F-G

I = 1-3-5 = A-C-E = Am
II = 2-4-6 = B-D-F = Bdim
III = 3-5-7 = C-E-G = Cmaj
IV = 4-6-1 = D-F-A = Dm
V = 5-7-2 = E-G-B = Em
VI = 6-1-3 = F-A-D = Fmaj
VII = 7-2-4 = G-B-D = Gmaj

If you don't understand WHY for example B-D-F is Bdim, I suggest you either study some more or ask me (either here or PM) to explain.

This works for EVERY SINGLE key, now in your example you used Am which is the relative minor of C major, so that's easier since it will contain the same chords as C major. Try figuring it out for, for example, the key of Bb. If you have it done, post back here.

Good luck.

In your example, can I make Em (the fifth chord) a dominant 7?
#10
Quote by Bestmiler
In your example, can I make Em (the fifth chord) a dominant 7?


yup, the G# will resolve strongly to A

So this is not true:

Quote by KoenDercksen
An E major chord does NOT fit into the Am scale. E major = E-G#-B

Do you see a G# ANYWHERE in the Am scale??? I don't.


You're right that the G# is not in the A natural minor scale, but the V instead of the v (E instead of Em) is often used to resolve stronger to the tonic. From wiki:

Perfect authentic cadence (PAC): The chords are in root position; that is, the roots of both chords are in the bass, and the tonic (the same pitch as root of the final chord) is in the highest voice. A PAC is a progression from V to I in major keys, and V to i in minor keys. This is generally the strongest type of cadence.


Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadence_(music)
Last edited by deHufter at Aug 29, 2009,
#11
Quote by KoenDercksen
An E major chord does NOT fit into the Am scale. E major = E-G#-B

Do you see a G# ANYWHERE in the Am scale??? I don't.



Raised 7th degree=harmonic minor scale.

Used to create a major V chord.
#13
Quote by Bestmiler
In the key of C, is the Bdim usually played as a Bmajor or Bminor?


Its usually played as B°. Its more common to find it altered to be B♭ (borrowed from the parallel minor, and can be thought of as a B° chord with a lowered root), than to find a B or a Bm chord in the key of C.
#14
Quote by Bestmiler
In your example, can I make Em (the fifth chord) a dominant 7?
The fifth chord of a minor key is often made into a major triad or dom7 as that gives you a strong leading tone - G# leads a lot more strongly into A than G does. BUT - if you do that and you are writing a lead line over the top of it be careful what notes you use, as you'd want to use the harmonic minor over that particular chord and nat minor over all the others.
#15
Quote by zhilla
The fifth chord of a minor key is often made into a major triad or dom7 as that gives you a strong leading tone - G# leads a lot more strongly into A than G does. BUT - if you do that and you are writing a lead line over the top of it be careful what notes you use, as you'd want to use the harmonic minor [or melodic minor] over that particular chord and nat minor over all the others.
^
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#16
Quote by Bestmiler
In the key of C, is the Bdim usually played as a Bmajor or Bminor?


I think what you are referring to, when you are confused by "minor" is that the last chord can be called a B minor 7 b5

Sometimes in the key of C the 7th is reduced by a half step and converted to a major - i.e. Bb