#1
Ok i know how to form chords and how to flat or raise the intervals to get different types of chord based on the major scale.

Now on a piano this would be so easy to do but the thing i can't ever follow is how you just know where the 3rd and 5th and 7th of a chord is when playing an open chord to then raise or flat it to get the chord you want.

Another problem is i know exactly what chords are in what key and why when referring to major/minor chords but when it comes to 7th chords or dominant chords how are you supposed to know?

Also, i love jazz music and i'd love to start playing it but how am i supposed to start improvising in jazz? What is a jazz scale and what makes jazz soloing different to the standard pentatonic minor scale etc.

Some advice would be great i'm pretty pissed right now with the complications of theory.

Thanks
#2
Learn the intervals on the guitar, so you'll know where the 3rds, 5ths, 7ths, etc are.

If you understand what notes are in a key, stack thirds to form 7th chords for every scale degree.
#3
But you can't play a 3rd and a 5th on the same string and in an open chord it doesn't just go 135 over 3 strings it goes something like 131517 over 6 strings or something stupid like that. I can't find the notes on each string without literally counting from the open string then raising or flatting the note i need.
Last edited by sleazydan at Aug 29, 2009,
#4
Ummm..... alright to play chords in keys the formula is
I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-VII. so you take the notes in a key and plug them in.
Key of C: Cmajor-Dminor-Eminor-Fmajor-Gmajor-Aminor-Bdiminished
If there is a sharp or a flat note in a key it just goes into a sharp or flat chord.
Key of G: Gmajor-Aminor-Bminor-Cmajor-Dmajor-Eminor-F#diminished
Hope that helps.
#5
Quote by etni69
Ummm..... alright to play chords in keys the formula is
I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-VII. so you take the notes in a key and plug them in.
Key of C: Cmajor-Dminor-Eminor-Fmajor-Gmajor-Aminor-Bdiminished
If there is a sharp or a flat note in a key it just goes into a sharp or flat chord.
Key of G: Gmajor-Aminor-Bminor-Cmajor-Dmajor-Eminor-F#diminished
Hope that helps.


Yea i understand that, i guess my problem is deeper than the basic chord theory. I guess having thought about it more, my problem is just with 7th chords etc. How do they tie into the whole key signature thing.
Thanks for your reply
#6
Quote by etni69
Ummm..... alright to play chords in keys the formula is
I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-VII.


That's actually...

I ii iii IV V vi vii°

...for major keys, and...

i ii° III iv v VI VII

for minor.
#7
Quote by sleazydan
Yea i understand that, i guess my problem is deeper than the basic chord theory. I guess having thought about it more, my problem is just with 7th chords etc. How do they tie into the whole key signature thing.
Thanks for your reply


Well lets see...... To play in the key of G the first chord and note is G
and there are other chords you can use in its place like a Major 7th chord.
(I) G [Gmaj7, Gmaj9, Gmaj11, Gmaj13]
(ii) Am [Am7, Am9, Am11, Am6]
(iii) Bm [Bm7]
(IV) C [Cmaj7, Cmaj9, Cmaj13, Cmaj6]
(V) D [D7, D9, D11, Dsus4, D13]
(vi) Em [Em7, Em9, Em11]
(vii) F# [Fm7b5]

The Brackets are chords you can use instead.
Does that help? I'm kind of new to chord theory haha
#8
Quote by etni69
Well lets see...... To play in the key of G the first chord and note is G
and there are other chords you can use in its place like a Major 7th chord.
(I) G [Gmaj7, Gmaj9, Gmaj11, Gmaj13]
(ii) Am [Am7, Am9, Am11, Am6]
(iii) Bm [Bm7]
(IV) C [Cmaj7, Cmaj9, Cmaj13, Cmaj6]
(V) D [D7, D9, D11, Dsus4, D13]
(vi) Em [Em7, Em9, Em11]
(vii) F# [Fm7b5]

The Brackets are chords you can use instead.
Does that help? I'm kind of new to chord theory haha


Hey man ...thats really useful...thanks ..but 1 question though ...
I always tht that the I, IV and V notes on a scale can played as major or 7ths ..
for example ...on the G major scale ... you can play G C and D all as majors ...
isn't that how it goes ? ...or can you only play G and C as a major and D has to be played as D7 (or one of the chords you've written in the brackets)...

if I am right ..then does that not mean that D can also be played as Dmaj7, D maj9 etc ...?
#9
Quote by inlovewithmusic
Hey man ...thats really useful...thanks ..but 1 question though ...
I always tht that the I, IV and V notes on a scale can played as major or 7ths ..
for example ...on the G major scale ... you can play G C and D all as majors ...
isn't that how it goes ? ...or can you only play G and C as a major and D has to be played as D7 (or one of the chords you've written in the brackets)...

if I am right ..then does that not mean that D can also be played as Dmaj7, D maj9 etc ...?

D7 is a major chord. It has a dominant seventh though, as opposed to the first and fourth degrees which have a major seventh. Of course you could play it as a major 7th chord, but diatonically it's a dominant 7th.
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#10
Quote by sleazydan
Ok i know how to form chords and how to flat or raise the intervals to get different types of chord based on the major scale.

Now on a piano this would be so easy to do but the thing i can't ever follow is how you just know where the 3rd and 5th and 7th of a chord is when playing an open chord to then raise or flat it to get the chord you want.

this comes with practice and yeah it's not as easy as a piano imo just learn a bunch of chords and different voicings and you'll learn to recognize how the intervals relate to the strings

Another problem is i know exactly what chords are in what key and why when referring to major/minor chords but when it comes to 7th chords or dominant chords how are you supposed to know?

can you explain this a little more i don't think i understand
This is what i think you're trying to say
Cmaj7: C E G B - these are all all notes in Cmajor so it's a major 7
Dmin7: D F A C - the key of Dmaj contains an F# and a C# but in the chord those two tones are flat giving the chord a flat 3 (minor third) and a flat 7 (minor 7)
Emin7: E G B D - same problem as above the key of Emajor has a G# and a D# upon flattening these we get a minor third and a minor 7
Fmaj7: F A C E - all these notes are part of the F major key so we're good
Gdom7 (G7): G B D F - G major scale has an F# in this chord it's an F natural so it's flatted a half step making it a minor 7th but when you have a minor 7th WITHOUT a minor third you usually call it a dominant 7th instead
Am7: A C E G- same as previous minor chords
B half diminished: B D F A - here the D F AND the A are off as the key of Bmaj has the notes D# F# and A# so we not have a flat 3rd, flat 5 and a flat7 making it half diminished

hopefully that's right


Also, i love jazz music and i'd love to start playing it but how am i supposed to start improvising in jazz? What is a jazz scale and what makes jazz soloing different to the standard pentatonic minor scale etc.

it's complicated but basically you want to use the notes that the chords of the song are comprised of

eg.you're playing over a Cmaj9 you would want to improvise using the notes C E G B and D cause that's what the chord is made of, then the chord changes to F7 you now try to use the notes F A C Eb etc. again it's complicated p.m. me and i'll see if i can answer any more questions