#1
I've been looking at Gibson Flying V's; the Flying V and Faded Flying V.

I've compared the two, they both have similar electronics and hardware, but this is what leaves me dumbfounded...

On Musician's Friend, there's so much more to the description for the Flying V than the Faded.

Here's the Flying V
* Solid mahogany body
* Premium nitrocellulose finish
* Set neck construction
* Extended neck joint
* V-Factor X Neck profile: Hybrid '50s rounded/'60s slim taper neck
* 17 degree angled headstock
* 22 fret ebony and rosewood fretboard
* Nickel and silver alloy fret wire
* Classic dot inlays
* 496R Hot Ceramic pickup in the neck
* 500T Super Ceramic in the bridge
* 2 volume, 1 tone control
* Tune-O-Matic bridge
* Stopbar tailpiece
* Includes hardshell case

Here's the Faded...
* Mahogany body
* Mahogany neck
* Rosewood fingerboard with dot inlays
* 24-3/4" scale length
* 1-11/16" nut width
* Tune-o-matic bridge with stopbar tailpiece
* Chrome hardware
* 496R and 500T ceramic magnet pickups
* Controls: 2 volume, one tone, 3-way switch

I don't care about the angled headstock or the fact that the Flying V comes with a hardshell case and the Faded comes with a gig bag so much, but the necks.

To anyone who has experience with both of this guitars, are the necks significantly different? Is one faster or thinner than the other?

When it comes down to it all, realistically I wouldn't be paying all that much more for the Nitrocellulose Flying V because the case that comes with it costs around $200-$250. The Faded V's gig bag is probably $50.
#2
I've played a faded and the neck is pretty small.
And they both have angled headstocks.

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#3
My advice is to play both and get what feels better to you.

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#4
Both guitars have nitrocellulose finishes - that's the material (well, substance) their finishes are made from. The only differences between them is one gets an extra coat and then is sanded and buffed back to a high gloss (regular finish), while the other is given a more basic finish which is merely sanded smooth (for the faded finish) and the 'faded' finish is initially dyed, washed and painted with purposefully aged colours.

In terms of spec, they're essentially the same, it's just a question of whether you like the 'faded' look or the 'new' look of the regular V.

With Gibson Les Paul models, the 'faded' models often get lumped with the inferior pieces of wood too while the nicer wood is kept for standard models, however in the case of the more niche guitars like the Flying V, Explorer and Firebirds, I believe both standard and faded/special/studio models all get the same wood selection. So there's no need to worry really; just buy whichever guitar you prefer the look of.
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#5
I don't know about the flying V, but the faded's neck scale feels too short for me
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#6
i would switch out the pups with some '57 classics.
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#7
Quote by RHCP987123
i would switch out the pups with some '57 classics.
not a good idea, though the stock pickups are certainly fairly bad, the '57 Classics aren't good pickups either. If you're going to spend money on aftermarket pickups, go with at least a decent set of Seymour Duncan or DiMarzio pickups. If you're feeling a bit more fancy, get some Bare Knuckle, Bill Lawrence or Swineshead pups - or get some proper bespoke pickups made for you from a company like Juicy, or the Seymour Duncan Custom Shop.
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#8
I heard the pickups really aren't that bad.

Now if you want to talk about crappy pickups... 490R/490T is the best example. Most people replace the 490R with a '57 Classic and leave the 490T in the bridge.

But I think I'll hang on to the 496R and 500T in the Flying V for awhile until I think I really need to replace the pups. At $100 a crack for '57's, I think it would be better to wait.

I've tried the Faded V and I loved it. The neck was perfect. When I play my Dean, the neck almost feels like a toy. If C necks went through puberty, I think most of them would end up like a Gibby Flying V neck...
#9
Just for ****s and giggles...





Like how you shouldn't judge a book by it's cover, I shouldn't judge a guitar off of it's crappy, edited and photoshopped to hell Musician's Friend photo, but the faded (top one, if you can't tell...) looks a hell of a lot better than the standard V. And it looks almost the same in person.
Last edited by r0ckth3d34n at Aug 29, 2009,
#10
Quote by r0ckth3d34n

I've tried the Faded V and I loved it. The neck was perfect. When I play my Dean, the neck almost feels like a toy. If C necks went through puberty, I think most of them would end up like a Gibby Flying V neck...
I did the same, way back when. I thought my Epi's neck was the most perfect neck ever and I couldn't imagine anything feeling better. Then I tired an ESP neck and that felt incredible... but then I picked up a Gibson with the 50's neck profile and that was that. The ESP and Epi necks feel like Guitar Hero controllers to me now. I don't know what it is about Gibson's necks, but they've got 'em right. Lots of people complain they're too big or the finishes are sticky or whatever, but playing and owning them, I've never found any of those problems - I think more people need to give them a fair try. For all their faults, if there is one thing Gibson does well, it's comfortable, great playing necks.



And re: the pictures: the top one, which I'm assuming is the faded version, looks better to me. If I was you, I'd be going for that.
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#11
I played the Faded version. It was like sex. With my hands. And wood (no pun intended).

You seem to be a Gibby guy... any chance you'd know why the bridge pickup is really freaking high on Gibsons? I played two at a GC: the Faded V and a SG Robot. Both bridge pickups were incredibly high. The neck pickups were pretty low. Maybe 4 millimeters from the pickguard.

You can't pay me to play an Epiphone LP neck. I tried a see-through blue one at GC once. I couldn't play barre chords to save me life.
#12
I've noticed the weird pickup height problem on a lot of production Gibsons. I really couldn't give you a definitive reason why - I assume they just think people will want the most output from the bridge pickup and more clarity from their neck pickup, so they set the heights differently. For what it's worth, every Gibson Custom Shop guitar I've come across has had their pickups matched in height and output perfectly, so it seems to be just a production Gibson problem. I geuss either Gibson production have a bad idea of what a good set-up is, or they just don't spend much time on it/don't care.
It's not just Gibsons though, most production USA Fenders, Jacksons, ESPs and Gretsch guitars I've come across have poor factory set-ups too. It's not something I give much thought to anymore, I just always assume the set-up is going to need work and pickup height in particular is so easy to fix, I don't pay it much attention.
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#13
It's so great to have run into such an expert! Haha.

It's odd though, I had both pickups on 10 and they were pretty much the same volume. The bridge was slightly louder. And it didn't bother me at all so honestly, I don't think I would care. I love how it felt and the sounds that come out it....

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#14
Quote by MrFlibble
I've noticed the weird pickup height problem on a lot of production Gibsons. I really couldn't give you a definitive reason why - I assume they just think people will want the most output from the bridge pickup and more clarity from their neck pickup, so they set the heights differently. For what it's worth, every Gibson Custom Shop guitar I've come across has had their pickups matched in height and output perfectly, so it seems to be just a production Gibson problem. I geuss either Gibson production have a bad idea of what a good set-up is, or they just don't spend much time on it/don't care.
It's not just Gibsons though, most production USA Fenders, Jacksons, ESPs and Gretsch guitars I've come across have poor factory set-ups too. It's not something I give much thought to anymore, I just always assume the set-up is going to need work and pickup height in particular is so easy to fix, I don't pay it much attention.

I think most brands assume that if your going to buy there 1500 dollar guitar, than you know its purpose. So they assume your going to raise or lower the action, cut the nut, its specific tuning, things like that.
#15
I always thought of Gibson as that company that sold high quality, expensive guitars.

After I found the Faded Flying V, I realized they make high quality, moderately expensive guitars as well.

I'll probably add the Faded SG into my collection after awhile.