#1
I haven't bee writing songs for very long but when I do I find it very difficult to come up with any kind of refrain or chorus.

So, any advice?

Should it be a general summary of the song, or maybe a single element?

Should each chorus vary slightly?

Could one verse I like most be 'promoted' to chorus?

Should it make the song clearer or should it be more cryptic and metaphorical so it will stand the test of being hear several times in the song?

Thanks, I'd appreciate any answers so much.
#2
So, any advice?
Yes. Now I'm no writing guru(especially not in the lyrics department), but I can tell you what I personally do when I write songs every once in a while.

Should it be a general summary of the song, or maybe a single element?

Generally, when I write choruses, they encompass the feeling of the song. It is the point that you want the listener to understand, which is why you hammer it at them about 3-4 times a song(hence, making it the chorus). It's where you shine, where that one really cool line or rhyme goes so everyone can hear it. The verses are-I don't want to say this because they shouldn't really be-fillers. Of course, it shouldn't just be meaningless words, but the verses are where you don't have to rhyme as much and it doesn't have to be - actually shouldn't be - catchy at all. Too much catchiness can ruin a song.

Should each chorus vary slightly?

In my personal opinion, no. The chorus should be the same every time. Some people write varying choruses, but I think the point of the chorus is that it's the hook, the thing you want people to remember and sing when they're bored at work. How can they remember it if it changes every time?

Could one verse I like most be 'promoted' to chorus?
This is what I personally do to write a chorus when I can't think of one. This doesn't mean do it all the time but if you are seriously at a complete loss for a chorus, then you can do this.

Should it make the song clearer or should it be more cryptic and metaphorical so it will stand the test of being hear several times in the song?

This isn't why you make it cryptic and metaphorical. It seems like alot of people misunderstand the purpose of metaphors for some reason. The purpose of a metaphor is to give the reader or listener something to relate the situation to, and help paint a more vivid picture in their head. Or to get the emotions across more. It shouldn't be so "cryptic" that nobody knows what the hell you're talking about, but not so obvious that people know right away. This is, of course, if you are using a metaphor. I mean, look at the chorus of any popular rock song.


For example, let's use Pain by Three Days Grace. I know 3DG doesn't exactly have the deepest lyrics most of the time, but it's still a good example.

Pain, without love
Pain, I can't get enough
Pain, I like rough
'Cause I'd rather feel pain than nothing at all
Pain, without love


I mean, this was a very popular song when it was first released, and look at the chorus. That's about as blunt and straight forward as you can get, and it "withstands the test of being heard several times in the song"

So no, you don't really need to. But if you do, do it right.


I think that should cover it. Also, read the Writing a Chorus section in the lyrics tips thread. It probably repeats most of the things I just told you, but I'm sure there's other little nuggets of wisdom hidden in there.

Good luck, keep writing.

Today I feel electric grey
I hope tomorrow, neon black