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#1
Alright, so my band has been playing some local shows, nothing huge, although we do have a pretty big show coming up soon, so we're trying to get ready for it. However, my other guitarist gets a bad case of stage-fright when we play. Its to the point to were he just keeps messing up. Last night, he messed up so bad he actually apologized to the audience, which is a HUGE no-no. What are somethings I can do to help him get over-stage fright? I've tried telling him my tips like going back stage and warming up or closing your eyes when you get nervous, stuff like that, but he still gets scared. He's one of my best friends, but it's starting to affect our live performance which will in turn effect our ability to get shows in the future. What should I do to help him get over it?
#3
Pour some beers in him, Tell him to hate the crowd, enough to don't give a crap about the crowd, but still be nice to the crowd.
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#4
How many gigs have you guys done? Cause I used to get stage fright too but I think I've played about 10-15 gigs now and it's very minimal. Some stage fright is not bad ofcourse cause that keeps you focused, but like that is pretty annoying. Is he a self-conscious guy?
#5
a liitle beer or weed
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#7
Quote by pawnluv
a liitle beer or weed


really? I'd say no to that... especially if he's doing backup vocals

One thing you have to remember is that you're on stage and they're not. these people are there to have a good time and they want you to succeed. They will judge but you have to remember that everybody is there to have a good time. Look up some drama warm ups for him to do before going on stage. If he introverted or extroverted, either way your personality changes on stage, and drama warm ups (preferably ones that you have to be loud and moving to do) will get him psyched up more....
... hopefully.

It takes some more time than others to get past stage fright, but sooner or later he'll come around ( :
#8
Quote by comftrblynum
really? I'd say no to that... especially if he's doing backup vocals

One thing you have to remember is that you're on stage and they're not. these people are there to have a good time and they want you to succeed. They will judge but you have to remember that everybody is there to have a good time. Look up some drama warm ups for him to do before going on stage. If he introverted or extroverted, either way your personality changes on stage, and drama warm ups (preferably ones that you have to be loud and moving to do) will get him psyched up more....
... hopefully.

It takes some more time than others to get past stage fright, but sooner or later he'll come around ( :



Key word being LITTLE, a beer or two wont affect your playing, and you'd have to be REAL high for it to mess you up at all.
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MXR Carbon Copy Delay
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#9
i had terrible stage fright when i started gigging. what i've done to help myself and still do it to this day is; i drink ice-cold water until i get brain freeze. honestly, it helps me, it might help your friend.
#10
Quote by Jehuty
How many gigs have you guys done? Cause I used to get stage fright too but I think I've played about 10-15 gigs now and it's very minimal. Some stage fright is not bad ofcourse cause that keeps you focused, but like that is pretty annoying. Is he a self-conscious guy?


He's kinda self-conscious, but he's more a pessimist than anything. I think that somehow his stage-fright is rooted in that. I get nervous right before a show, but I let go and play when I'm up there. Somehow, I've got to do the same for him
#11
Tell him some jokes or have a little fun before going onstage, but definetly get him to warm up backstage with a few scales or one of the simpler songs on the setlist on his own. That should give him a bit of confidence. Also, he should really try stretching his body to relax the muscles in case he tends to tense up onstage.

But don't care about what the crowd thinks (in a positive way). If you play extreme music, like myself, have him feel that the riffs he's playing will blow the crowds' brains out.

I honestly still get stage fright and am working on it, but it could be worse if none of the techniques were involved, right?

Does he usually become self-conscious during your band's practice sessions?
#13
give him a shot of whiskey/confidence, just enough to "loosen" him up or make him talkatative. Just dont get him wasted haha
#14
Tell him that it's most likely that he'll never see that crowd again ever so he should just have fun and play.
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#15
Have him not face the audience. Turn him towards the band, or at least have him stand next to the drums towards the back a little bit. Sometimes it's the feeling of being out in the open that's scary.
#16
He's not arrogant enough. You need to help build his confidence. He needs to go on stage with a mindset of arrogance like he's better than everybody else on the floor.
#17
i get stage fright everytime i step onto the stage, being in the limelight scares the hell out of me... I dont know really what to tell him though, Youve gotta be the kind of person that thinks the rush is worth the fear. And remember just because he can play an instrument doesnt mean that he was ever meant to be in a band, its just not for some people.

But like people are saying get a little liquid courage in him and see what happens
#18
Quote by soundgarden19
Tell him that it's most likely that he'll never see that crowd again ever so he should just have fun and play.

Which brings up a point to be made: If he'll never see that crowd again, he, as a guitarist, needs to leave his mark or a.k.a A GOOD IMPRESSION!
#19
There's lots of tricks to get over it at the start.

Firstly, never tell the audience. You wouldn't tell a prospective boss at a job interview that you're feeling really nervous - they have no use for a nervous person. Same goes for an audience - they've come to watch an entertainer, not some nervous random. If you tell the audience, one of the biggest effects is that they'll ignore the music and remember you as "that nervous guy".

Secondly, stage-fright is usually a symptom of under-preparation. You haven't practiced the songs enough. You shouldn't be thinking about the songs while playing - they should be hardwired into your hands so you don't have to think about them. If the first song goes fine, usually the nerves will drain away, if not they'll just increase and increase affecting each unpracticed song until the whole thing falls apart. So practice the entire set at home as you'd play it live regularly, song after song with no breaks.

Thirdly, if it's the audience specifically that's putting him off, practice at home infront of a few close friends so he starts getting the idea of what it's like.
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#20
Quote by AlanHB
If the first song goes fine, usually the nerves will drain away,


+1
Choose one of your upbeat, but simpler songs for the opening song. This will get everyone clicking and settling in to all that pre-show energy.

...and gosh dang it, just plain HAVE FUN...after all this aint brain surgery...it's fricken' Rock n Roll...!!!
#21
Quote by AlanHB


Secondly, stage-fright is usually a symptom of under-preparation. You haven't practiced the songs enough. You shouldn't be thinking about the songs while playing - they should be hardwired into your hands so you don't have to think about them. If the first song goes fine, usually the nerves will drain away, if not they'll just increase and increase affecting each unpracticed song until the whole thing falls apart. So practice the entire set at home as you'd play it live regularly, song after song with no breaks.


Actually, I think this pretty much sums up his problem. He never practices. I find myself getting onto him during practice sessions for his lack of practice. But honestly, I can't help him if he doesn't want to help himself
#22
Quote by 3rdActguitarist
Actually, I think this pretty much sums up his problem. He never practices. I find myself getting onto him during practice sessions for his lack of practice. But honestly, I can't help him if he doesn't want to help himself



well either tell him to practice more, or he might be kicked out


if you see better practice sessions after u tell him that, but still stage fright
i would get some girls in there and let him have his way with them =D


or if he had a gf


other than that idk
good luck dudes!



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#23
Quote by 3rdActguitarist
Actually, I think this pretty much sums up his problem. He never practices. I find myself getting onto him during practice sessions for his lack of practice. But honestly, I can't help him if he doesn't want to help himself


This is pretty much /thread right here. I've never been worried or nervous about gigs, and this is because I've always practiced A LOT to make sure I know the songs and can play them perfectly. MAKE him practice, and if he doesn't, you need to replace him, seriously. If one of my band members f***ed up really badly and then apologised to the crowd, because he hadn't practiced , I would probably punch him, you can't let it fly if you're playing serious gigs.
Sorry if this seems harsh, but if you have a big show coming up, lack of practice should be the last thing you need to worry about...
Last edited by SilentHeaven109 at Aug 30, 2009,
#24
Quote by AlanHB
There's lots of tricks to get over it at the start.

Firstly, never tell the audience. You wouldn't tell a prospective boss at a job interview that you're feeling really nervous - they have no use for a nervous person. Same goes for an audience - they've come to watch an entertainer, not some nervous random. If you tell the audience, one of the biggest effects is that they'll ignore the music and remember you as "that nervous guy".

Secondly, stage-fright is usually a symptom of under-preparation. You haven't practiced the songs enough. You shouldn't be thinking about the songs while playing - they should be hardwired into your hands so you don't have to think about them. If the first song goes fine, usually the nerves will drain away, if not they'll just increase and increase affecting each unpracticed song until the whole thing falls apart. So practice the entire set at home as you'd play it live regularly, song after song with no breaks.

Thirdly, if it's the audience specifically that's putting him off, practice at home infront of a few close friends so he starts getting the idea of what it's like.



Alot of people find it harder to play in front of friends than strangers, i know i do
#27
Quote by dmiwshicldply
Alot of people find it harder to play in front of friends than strangers, i know i do


That's true, but by trying the harder option you'll get better at the easier one.

Looks like practice is the key again (as for everything). I personally don't tolerate members in a band who don't practice as it shows their lack of dedication, or the fact they really don't want to be in a band.
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#28
Quote by AlanHB
That's true, but by trying the harder option you'll get better at the easier one.

Looks like practice is the key again (as for everything). I personally don't tolerate members in a band who don't practice as it shows their lack of dedication, or the fact they really don't want to be in a band.


I kinda feel the same way. We've been in contact with a record label lately and they're putting us on itunes here in a bit (Sept 14 I think). They're told us that if we really work at it and impress them like we have, they'll sign us. I've been practicing and writing new material like crazy, same goes for my drummer and vocalist. Guitar #2 is one of my best friends (I'm not gonna embarrass him by using his name) but he just never really puts any real effort into his playing or writing, in fact, the only thing he really puts effort into is promoting. He promotes the sh*t out our stuff lol. Like 90% of our local fan-base that comes to our shows are either his friends or friends of his friends lol. I really really don't want to kick him out, that'd be overly harsh on my part I think. But I will lay down the law with him and tell him either he practices or I'll be left with no choice in the matter
#29
I don't know all that's been said, but stage experience helps. Even if it isn't with the band, it helps you be more comfortable. Giving speeches in school, joining choir or band, being in a play, anything that gets you in front of large groups of people helps. Lots of times it is a confidence issue that only experience can cure.
#30
1. He needs to practice. If he's not confident off stage, he'll never be confident on stage.
2. Get him to do some open mic nights by himself or just him and a singer.

But, there's really nothing you can do for him if he doesn't want to help himself.
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#31
Quote by 3rdActguitarist
I kinda feel the same way. We've been in contact with a record label lately and they're putting us on itunes here in a bit (Sept 14 I think). They're told us that if we really work at it and impress them like we have, they'll sign us. I've been practicing and writing new material like crazy, same goes for my drummer and vocalist. Guitar #2 is one of my best friends (I'm not gonna embarrass him by using his name) but he just never really puts any real effort into his playing or writing, in fact, the only thing he really puts effort into is promoting. He promotes the sh*t out our stuff lol. Like 90% of our local fan-base that comes to our shows are either his friends or friends of his friends lol. I really really don't want to kick him out, that'd be overly harsh on my part I think. But I will lay down the law with him and tell him either he practices or I'll be left with no choice in the matter


Actually the promotional guy is far more useful than a quiet virtuoso. He does need to practice more, but in advising so you should tell him that you recognise his effort, and that "he's getting the fans there, we just need to ALL practice more so we can get really tight and keep them". Or something to that effect.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#32
Quote by 3rdActguitarist
I kinda feel the same way. We've been in contact with a record label lately and they're putting us on itunes here in a bit (Sept 14 I think). They're told us that if we really work at it and impress them like we have, they'll sign us. I've been practicing and writing new material like crazy, same goes for my drummer and vocalist. Guitar #2 is one of my best friends (I'm not gonna embarrass him by using his name) but he just never really puts any real effort into his playing or writing, in fact, the only thing he really puts effort into is promoting. He promotes the sh*t out our stuff lol. Like 90% of our local fan-base that comes to our shows are either his friends or friends of his friends lol. I really really don't want to kick him out, that'd be overly harsh on my part I think. But I will lay down the law with him and tell him either he practices or I'll be left with no choice in the matter



Maybe you'd be better off getting him to help manage your band, and just be a secondary guitarist- either get someone else to do guitar with you or do it all yourself. Then if you reallly need someone for a show, he could play for you.
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#33
Tell him to not give a **** about the crowd and just play
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#34
Something that hasn't been said is that you guys should probably jam together more.

Getting a song 100 percent right is not as good as having great band chemistry and making the audience feel like you aren't just a coverband or a bunch of wannabe musicians. If you jam together often you'll develop dynamics to help each other out, if he fudges up a solo he'll learn just the right lick to bring it all back, if the drummer goes off beat, he'll know the right breakdown to get everything back together etc.

When you are able to make music on the spot and make your original music really dynamic and malleable, you will be unable to screw up a show unless massively drunk or high.
#35
Terrible advice all through this thread. Just get it through to him that nobody knows your music as well you guys do and no one notices if you mess up. Unless, you give them a reason to notice like make a really obvious face or apologize.
#36
i'd say get your hands on an electroshok collar and throw it around his neck. everytime he messes up, ZAP! just a quick jolt though, you don't want to cause any lasting damage.
#37
Quote by Zycho
Terrible advice all through this thread. Just get it through to him that nobody knows your music as well you guys do and no one notices if you mess up. Unless, you give them a reason to notice like make a really obvious face or apologize.


Of course this thread was resolved 2 months ago.

The problem was that he hadn't practiced enough. Your comment would not be relevant to someone who didn't know his parts, and especially not relevant to a cover band where the audience would know the music just as well as the band.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#39
Quote by dmiwshicldply
i get stage fright everytime i step onto the stage, being in the limelight scares the hell out of me... I dont know really what to tell him though, Youve gotta be the kind of person that thinks the rush is worth the fear. And remember just because he can play an instrument doesnt mean that he was ever meant to be in a band, its just not for some people.

But like people are saying get a little liquid courage in him and see what happens


I hope this was intentional.
#40
Quote by GrisKy
i'd say get your hands on an electroshok collar and throw it around his neck. everytime he messes up, ZAP! just a quick jolt though, you don't want to cause any lasting damage.


I really hope that was a joke, you just can't tell sarcasm on the internet.
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