#1
I tend to switch a lot between triplets and straight eighth notes. But I know this is only the tip of the barrel when it comes to rhythmic variety. For example, I don't hear a lot of syncopation in a lot of music these days. Most people try to add "complexity" by just using poly rhythms like 8 to the 5, etc.

How do you personally try to use rhythmic variety in your playing? What are some of your favorite rhythmic patterns? What are your thoughts on the saying "Rests are just as important as playing"?
#2
i think my rhythm is the worst part of my playing...i can keep it going..but i feel i lack creativity in always making the rhythm feel different...alot of time it just seems like the same progression maybe in a different key and the same old strumming pattern/rhythm
#3
To me rhythm is key... if your rhythm is crap, nothing more can be said for your soloing, which in itself... is a rhythm across another...

A solid rhythm can spark creativity with your melody. I tend to keep my rhythms constant to 8ths mostly. One thing I learned from watching Steve Morse is playing your bass note and running your melody across it at the same time (which makes it sound like more than one guitar going).
At the end of a rhythmic phrase i love adding sextuplet strumming... and depending on the tempo, a 32nd chord burst.

Other than that, i really aim at making my one track combining all the elements of a full band... its a challenge but all worth it
#4
Quote by Anteaterking
I tend to switch a lot between triplets and straight eighth notes. But I know this is only the tip of the barrel when it comes to rhythmic variety. For example, I don't hear a lot of syncopation in a lot of music these days. Most people try to add "complexity" by just using poly rhythms like 8 to the 5, etc.

How do you personally try to use rhythmic variety in your playing? What are some of your favorite rhythmic patterns? What are your thoughts on the saying "Rests are just as important as playing"?


I'd definitely say the pauses are equally important to the playing. It's exactly why a band like AC/DC can get away with writing so many songs with the same chords and the same keys.

But I love my rhythms. With a good rhythm, you can jam on a single chord if need be. You don't even need to switch from straight notes to triplets or anything like that, and to be honest that kind of thing tends to harm a good rhythm more than help it. All you really need to to is find interesting places to pause and interesting places to play.

I can't say I'm a huge fan of polyrhythm though. It's one of those things that's cool from a technical perspective but it's not something that tends to be memorable or pull people into the groove. I am a big fan of syncopated rhythms though, I tend to use that kind of thing a lot of my own playing and the songs I write. It's a shame that you don't really hear it a whole lot in modern music.
#5
One example of something cool recently that I heard was from a classical piece. One of the Grieg piano concertos, the last movement. The part was in 3/4 time with accents on every other quarter note. It was a neat effect, but boy was it hard to keep straight in your mind when you were in the band.