#1
My guitar teacher I would say is good, but to be honest I wouldn't know since I have nothing to compare him to.

Gimme a brief overview of what your teacher does with you during your be it 30min/1hr lessons, how he teaches the things... explains and everything ... it will be interesting to see the difference to my teacher.
You Are Reading A True Guitarists Signature. Stop Thinking I'm Not You Know I Am.

Quote by imdeth
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#2
I'll help get this thread started.

I usually come in, sit down, get my stuff out. We go over what he gave me to learn the previous lesson, then he either has something new from a guitarist we both like to teach me, or he asks me what I want to learn. We also dabble with improvisation and theory.

Does that cover it? :P
#3
Quote by leej11
My guitar teacher I would say is good, but to be honest I wouldn't know since I have nothing to compare him to.




Main points you should be looking for:-

Warm ups/scales & arpeggios
Basic music reading help
Basic Music theory and how it works
Ear training
Sight reading
Variety of styles and techniques pick and fingerstyle, various genres of music
Takes your music taste into account but also shows you stuff
Teacher breaks up lesson into segments for you
Teacher asks you music questions to help your understanding
Should not be aggressive if you dont get anything or impatient
Should not blindly go through tabs without asking questions relating to rhythms, theory, or other musical related things. The music you learn should contain a lot of things.
You should have some sort of relationship in terms of getting on in general

Note that it is a very personal thing, you could get tons out of a lesson from a beginner teacher than one of the best it really depends on how you connect together. There is a strange phenominan these days where pupils seem to be quick to question their teachers methods and their capabilities. I teach drums and find that the more subserviant the student is the more they progress. Ive had students who would try and do things their own way and not take any advice.

Explain what the lesson consists of.
Last edited by bellyache at Aug 30, 2009,
#4
I've been with my guitar teacher for a LONG time.

I walk in the door and I will usually have questions about one of the pieces I'm working on or about something else I've encountered in theory or whatever.

We're in exam mode at the moment so alot of it revolves around that.

My last class I went in asking why there was a tiny treble cleff in the middle of a bar of music, he answered that pretty quickly. Showing me some more examples of where that occurs. The I asked what CII meant on top of a chord in some sheet music. I asked a heap of questions and he answered them all really well.

Then we went onto my next exam piece, 'cause I was stressing out that I hadn't started my 7th piece yet. We skimmed over it and pinpointed what all the hard bits would be. We figured out the fingering for the first half of the chords, then we played through it really slowly.

Then we went back to another piece I was having trouble with and he helped me with that...

Then I talked about how I might arrange that piece for me and one other guitar. Then we talked about dynamics and feeling and stuff..

Then if we don't get too carried away and we a have a few minutes left he'll test my ear and play different notes/chords/intervals and guitar/piano and make sure I get them right.

then an hour was up. But I generally go in with a few questions up my sleeve or a pretty good idea of what I would like to cover in that class. If I don't have anything to do he will give me a new piece. after being with him for so long I have some idea of what sheet music he has, so I an generally name a song or artist to learn.


tl;dr we do a LOT
Last edited by mdwallin at Aug 31, 2009,
#5
There is nothing to compare if you don't give reference of your playing.

If your legato sucks, and he says it's fine, then he's bad.

- we can't judge this

If you know what a 7#9 chord is, but don't know what a sus chord is then he's not doing it very good (although this can be argued on)

- but we can't judge this.

I teach guitar myself, and use an approach that I can't make many errors.

What I do is not purely teach techniques, but teach someone to be an asshole towards his playing.

I make people aware to a point where they argue to me that they don't like something I play.

It's safe bet, and insures that they can learn on their selves after my teachings.

That's just my way though, and I wouldn't dare to say my approach is the all being, because a few students left because I said they are being lazy, or I found that they didn't have a talent or just took to long to grasp what I believe are simple concepts if you concentrate and practice good enough.

I know this is not the most diplomatic thing to do, but I'm not the only teacher, and that's my way.

----------

I believe it's best that you look at as many sources as you can.

Grab a lesson from the internet, or from an instruction vid, a real teacher, or even a guy you meet at a jamsession.

That way you get different views of different people, and have a more rounded perspective.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 31, 2009,
#6
Cheers guys well here's how my lessons generally speaking pan out...

Usually I walk in the door and sometimes have little things/questions on some music/theory which I start the lesson with. From there sometimes it can take a good chunk of the hour lesson orientated on that question depending on what it is.

For example when I was struggling with a 16th note riff in one the the grade pieces we went over with metronome as you do with bursts etc. etc. On the other hand it could be a simple why is there umm... a dot under/above the note and he would simply explain in a matter of minutes.

Other than that, I would say the lessons are largely driven by the Grading books... (Rockschool Grade 5) and we go over the stuff needed to learn for that. Legato, arpegios, chords, songs, ear training.

Also Sight reading is incorparated which I think he does a good job of teaching me Just not so fun practicing at home haha

The one thing I don't see him doing which a lot of you guys do and what I would actually like is to learn songs like pff sweet child o mine or something for example.

Although he said last lesson to buy "Jam with Joe Satriani" book/cd as he teaches some songs from there after I've got down grade 5 which I pretty much have

Hmm I reckon I do have a good teacher but maybe from understanding what you guys have said he goes slightly more to "his plan" than lets say "what would you like to learn?"

Cheers guys and please do post more about how your lessons go... maybe we can make some official "guitar teachers/lesson thread" haha
You Are Reading A True Guitarists Signature. Stop Thinking I'm Not You Know I Am.

Quote by imdeth
Eblast over her face and tell her you need your privacy.
#7
Quote by leej11
My guitar teacher I would say is good, but to be honest I wouldn't know since I have nothing to compare him to.

Gimme a brief overview of what your teacher does with you during your be it 30min/1hr lessons, how he teaches the things... explains and everything ... it will be interesting to see the difference to my teacher.



This really isn't a fair way to judge your teacher. Good teachers will cater to each individual students needs. What one persons teacher shows them, might not be appropriate for you at this time. Now, there are bad teachers out there, but in general you should trust that your teacher is qualified and has your best interest in mind when instructing you.

Keep in mind that the benefits of lessons are realized over many lessons, not just that one 1/2 hour.

I would put more focus into questioning your own efforts, so you can get the most out of your lessons, rather then rating your teacher.


Quote by xxdarrenxx
What I do is not purely teach techniques, but teach someone to be an asshole towards his playing.


What ??????
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 31, 2009,
#8
Listen to Munky.

And I think darren means he encourages his students to be self-critical, so they listen to what they are playing and pick up on thier own mistakes and weaknesses?
#9
Quote by zhilla
Listen to Munky.

And I think darren means he encourages his students to be self-critical, so they listen to what they are playing and pick up on thier own mistakes and weaknesses?


hehe, yeah I know what he meant. I just thought that was a funny way to put it, and wanted to see what he'd say.

I have to say I take the opposite approach. I teach critical listening, which ofcourse includes being aware of mistakes or weaknesses, but I don't want the students to be so critical of their own playing as to take the enjoyment out of it, or to be discouraging. (that's kinda the vibe I got from his statement, though I have a feeling that it just wasn't worded all that well)

The best teachers I've had were the ones that made me feel like I had potential as well as make me aware of the things I need to work on.

I guess I'm saying a good balance between the 2 is what I think is best.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 31, 2009,
#10
My teacher just looks so sad when I screw up that guilt makes me try and focus on my weaknesses and fix them lol
#11
sigh... i never had a teacher... munky, be my teacher, you sound nice. Darren wont be a nice teacher for me cos I'm too much of an ass as it is
#12
Quote by zhilla
My teacher just looks so sad when I screw up that guilt makes me try and focus on my weaknesses and fix them lol


LOL yeah, that can be effective.

Quote by evolucian
sigh... i never had a teacher... munky, be my teacher, you sound nice. Darren wont be a nice teacher for me cos I'm too much of an ass as it is


shred is gaudy music
#13
^And now i'm being laughed at... sigh.

I guess i'll search for that holy grail of teachers elsewhere.... sigh.

Maybe I can find one who can make me tea and offer a foot massage too... ooooooh, now that'll be killer.

lee, your teacher is doing a great job... you are on grade 5 already which is cool... I dont have any grades. You gettin a good ejewmacation der. And if he answers yr queries fully... then there's no need to judge him. The only time you'll need to leave him is when you oneday question the higher complexities of music within styles and note choice and the great beyond. Not all teachers know the great beyond as its a level of understanding what a person wants to play from inside. A lot of players say you have to find it for yourself, but thats not quite true. You find it in others... and i think i may be confusing people right now... stay with yr teacher. And when you ready, search munky out.... he's good and solid.
#14
Quote by evolucian
^And now i'm being laughed at... sigh.

I guess i'll search for that holy grail of teachers elsewhere.... sigh.

Maybe I can find one who can make me tea and offer a foot massage too... ooooooh, now that'll be killer.

lee, your teacher is doing a great job... you are on grade 5 already which is cool... I dont have any grades. You gettin a good ejewmacation der. And if he answers yr queries fully... then there's no need to judge him. The only time you'll need to leave him is when you oneday question the higher complexities of music within styles and note choice and the great beyond. Not all teachers know the great beyond as its a level of understanding what a person wants to play from inside. A lot of players say you have to find it for yourself, but thats not quite true. You find it in others... and i think i may be confusing people right now... stay with yr teacher. And when you ready, search munky out.... he's good and solid.


Na, not laughing at you. I'm experienced, but no holy grail. I would be glad to help if you ever need it and I do actually teach online (webcam lessons). No foot massages though
shred is gaudy music
#15
Lolz;

My apologies for not excelling in the art of semantics.

I meant self critical indeed.

I have noticed that people who don't look critical towards their playing, but do want to learn on the guitar, and not just play the odd campfire song (sorta speak) get stuck in a rut.

They don't know what to learn, and always want to find the fastest/flashiest licks etc. until they get bored and stuck in a rut.

I found my students enjoying details more, and therefore also gain more respect for the "better" guitarplaying, and looking in a broader way.

They usually also get to enjoy music overall more, because they listen "better"to details in a song and often get a better understanding of what the artist wants to portray.

The only students that got discouraged by my critical attitude, are the ones that were to lazy to learn.

If you play guitar pure for your enjoyment, that's fine.

I however teach people how to play guitar, and not how to enjoy themselves. (Albeit it being a bi-product if you get more self critical).

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 31, 2009,
#16
the first day that i went to my guitar instructor he told me to play w/e i wanted for him and from there he pointed out technique flaws and pretty much everything else. after that he asked me what i want to do with guitar playing and i said i want to be a musician so for the past 2 years he's been teaching me jazz standards and pretty much everything that i should know to help me get on the road to become a musician.
#17
hehe, just testing your ego... you failed... I had the Throne for you and all... you ruined the friendship... Lunch bar, the mooch moor etc etc..

Cool man, ta for the offer. Busy working thru the Jerry Bergonzi series at the mo. Its an interesting take on improv. But damn do you have to think fast, ugh... its like I can't be an average guitarist anymore... have to wipe away the drool (or have a big bibb)
#18
Quote by xxdarrenxx
Lolz;

My apologies for not excelling in the art of semantics.

I meant self critical indeed.

I have noticed that people who don't look critical towards their playing, but do want to learn on the guitar, and not just play the odd campfire song (sorta speak) get stuck in a rut.

They don't know what to learn, and always want to find the fastest/flashiest licks etc. until they get bored and stuck in a rut.

I found my students enjoying details more, and therefore also gain more respect for the "better" guitarplaying, and looking in a broader way.

They usually also get to enjoy music overall more, because they listen "better"to details in a song and often get a better understanding of what the artist wants to portray.

The only students that got discouraged by my critical attitude, are the ones that were to lazy to learn.

If you play guitar pure for your enjoyment, that's fine.

I however teach people how to play guitar, and not how to enjoy themselves. (Albeit it being a bi-product if you get more self critical).


Well, everyones into it for different reasons and at different levels. I don't require that all students be on the same level in terms of seriousness. I don't see that as a realistic approach.
I also realize that more of the students that are apt to be serious, already are..... I just have to guide them. If I hear something that I think they should be aware of, I point it out. But it's not like I'm saying "you screwed that up". it's more like "focus on your timing for this section ..... this is what you're after...(gives example).."

Quote by xxdarrenxx


I however teach people how to play guitar, and not how to enjoy themselves. (Albeit it being a bi-product if you get more self critical).


Of-course, but you don't want to make people so critical of every note they make, that they can't even enjoy the act of playing their guitar.


I guess I would rather teach a person to listen critically as opposed to being critical of themselves.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 31, 2009,
#19
My students write a song for me every week.... cos they love me... apart from that, its their homework. So I help them construct the perfect formulaic song if you wish.

Before anyone questions it... its the reason they came to me in the first place
#20
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, everyones into it for different reasons and at different levels. I don't require that all students be on the same level in terms of seriousness. I don't see that as a realistic approach.
I also realize that more of the students that are apt to be serious, already are..... I just have to guide them. If I hear something that I think they should be aware of, I point it out. But it's not like I'm saying "you screwed that up". it's more like "focus on your timing for this section ..... this is what you're after...(gives example).."


Of-course, but you don't want to make people so critical of every note they make, that they can't even enjoy the act of playing their guitar.


I guess I would rather teach a person to listen critically as opposed to being critical of themselves.



True, but my teaching is not a full time/main job, and I do teach mainly to guide the eager-to-learn players, who want to learn, but might get caught in the immensity of all the aspects involved.

I just help them to map it out more, and stay at 1 thing at a time, and make sure that all the things get a balanced ?input?.

It's not that I have a standard scheme for all players, but I do teach only if people really want to learn to play it.

If I hear something that I think they should be aware of, I point it out. But it's not like I'm saying "you screwed that up". it's more like "focus on your timing for this section ..... this is what you're after...(gives example).."


I just used general terms, off course I'm not saying "you screwed up, give me 20" or w/e.

I am for the "think about it" approach.

An example:

You can say this;

You should improve your timing on that, you should play that more aggresive

I however, would say this;

What of what you just played felt "Right", or what do you think you played well, and do you feel there's something missing.


Off course, if they do not see their errors I point it out.

If you say the first thing, then subconsciously you already look for errors, and your basically "Helping someone".

My approach totally depends on own initiative, cause if one plays something perfect, I will still ask the same question.

Like I said, if one doesn't spot something, I will still tell them, but I found that this subtle difference of "Questioning" somehow does something in one's brain to get a more intuitive and more mature (if you will) view towards their playing.


I teach people to match their feelings with the output on the guitar.

Whether it be technical, a note choice question or a feel (ie. to energetic, try to "pull the rhythm" more) depends on the situation.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 31, 2009,
#21
so your saying that the subtle difference is this...

instead of showing people what they should work on, you ask them to recognize it instead?


If it's something we've went over already I may take a similar approach, but not on new material.


I think the only subtle difference in your point here has to do with particular situations. And it's a common approach actually. You teach someone something, then you test their ability to recognize it after they've had time to take it in.

Anyway, I don't think your approach is bad (or any different to mine actually), I think it's just how you originally worded it that gave me the wrong idea.

I don't want my students to be assholes to themselves, (which I take to mean overly -self critical). Id rather they be reasonable & realistic in their criticism of themselves or others.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 31, 2009,
#22
Quote by GuitarMunky
so your saying that the subtle difference is this...

instead of showing people what they should work on, you ask them what it is?


If it's something we've went over I may take a similar approach, but not on new material.

Anyway, I don't think your approach is bad (or any different to mine actually), I think it's just how you originally worded it that gave me the wrong idea.



Yes;

It's quite a simple psychological thing;

If you tell them this and this is wrong, they depend on you, and might develop a sense of that if their teacher doesn't point something out, it's good.

This also means, that if you on the odd occasion wouldn't spot a mistake, that they will still assume it is right, because their brain will have learned to "think critical"if impulse = teacher to say it very robotic.

I actually had a student tell me that a riff that I was playing at the time, would sound better if I palm mute it more.

Dude was totally into metal, and I was a bit out of it, so I didn't notice it.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Aug 31, 2009,
#23
I was wondering the same thing with my teacher. Mt teacher has a Master's Degree in Jazz Guitar at Berklee and has shown me all 1000 and something chords, he knows em by memory. We go over this instruction book, he has a book he writes in, we go over theory and notation, I ask any questions and stuff. Also, what works really great for me is that if you are home practicing, and get stumped, just write down your questions and ask em when you have the lessons. Helps me not to forget them. Half hour lessons are too short, hour lessons are ok, but 45 minute lessons would rock!