#1
So i was looking at the megadeth song In My Darkest Hour and i was trying to work out what the intro chord was by working out the notes, however I worked out the name of the chord via the notes E Fsharp G D then B.

I could work out that was Eminor since it had an F sharp and no G sharp in there and now understand that it is Em9 after looking it up (the F sharp note making it Em9?). The other thing i couldnt work out was why it would not be called G7Madd13 because the III chord in a minor key would be major or the other alternative name could be Bm13(no7no9) as chord V is minor.

So i cant work out how to determine more complicated chords, which one they should be from different alternatives and also by sound.
Last edited by bellyache at Aug 30, 2009,
#4
It's all dependent on the chords around it. If you are in the key of E minor and you return to that chord a lot, it's probably the tonic chord. Typically, in a setting where any old chord name will do, you would also use the simplest one.

Em9- Two "variations"
G7Madd13- Three "variations"
Bm13(no 7 no 9)- Four "variations"
#5
Quote by Anteaterking
It's all dependent on the chords around it. If you are in the key of E minor and you return to that chord a lot, it's probably the tonic chord. Typically, in a setting where any old chord name will do, you would also use the simplest one.

Em9- Two "variations"
G7Madd13- Three "variations"
Bm13(no 7 no 9)- Four "variations"



okay thanks. could you explain what you mean by the variations?
#6
A fairly simple way to tell is by looking at the bass. Generally speaking the lowest note heard will be the root note.

It's mostly a matter of using your ears though. Listen to the chord and ask yourself if it sounds major or minor. It certainly sounds minor to me. Then look at the other instruments. The second guitar is playing an E5 chord, while the bass is playing an E note. All of that goes to support the Em9 chord.
#7
Quote by icronic
A fairly simple way to tell is by looking at the bass. Generally speaking the lowest note heard will be the root note.

It's mostly a matter of using your ears though. Listen to the chord and ask yourself if it sounds major or minor. It certainly sounds minor to me. Then look at the other instruments. The second guitar is playing an E5 chord, while the bass is playing an E note. All of that goes to support the Em9 chord.



but that isnt always the case, hence the post
#8
well then all you have to do is figure out the root. And there's plenty of threads on that.
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#9
Quote by Ribcage
well then all you have to do is figure out the root. And there's plenty of threads on that.



but what about in cases of inversions, or if it is a first inversion but the chord is not prominant and or is not the name of the key like discussed above
#10
Quote by bellyache
but what about in cases of inversions, or if it is a first inversion but the chord is not prominant and or is not the name of the key like discussed above


I've already told you. Look at the bass, look at any other instruments, and simply listen.

In the case of your song the only possibilities are Em9 or GM7add13 (BM7Add13- just doesn't make sense). Listen to the chord, if it sounds like a minor it's a minor, if it sounds major, you guessed it... It's major. In the case of your song, it's obviously minor. Thus, Em9.

Now if for some reason you're dealing with inversions and have no other instruments to use as a reference point then you basically have to look at the chords that surround the one in question, and figure out what kind of progression makes the most sense.

To be perfectly honest with you, you're completely over complicating something that's relatively simple. Unless you're dealing with incredibly complex jazz or something the answer is always going to be fairly obvious.