#1
Which is the stronger/nicer wood for a strat neck?
Rosewood or Maple?
"Notes are expensive, so spend them wisely." BB King
#2
Maple, i wouldn't recommend making any major body parts of Rosewood other than fretboards
#3
It doesn't matter which one is stronger, because the load is on the truss rod.


Maple is snappier, brighter and great for indie, country, punk etc.

Rosewood is warmer and better imo for blues and general rock (though Iron Maiden have done well with both, so you might as well make your own mind up on that).
#4
Quote by willT08
Maple, i wouldn't recommend making any major body parts of Rosewood other than fretboards

I think Fender makes a Tele with a rosewood body, but i may be wrong. It's a very dark wood, comparable to mahogany if i'm not mistaken.

Warmoth makes laminate tops, bodies, necks, and fretboards out of rosewood so it should be fine.
#5
Stronger; probably maple since most maple necks are one-piecce and, in my experience, it's a harder wood. Nice is your call. Personally I love both and if I had the money I'd already have a rosewood-fretboard strat too. Rosewood's softer with a darker and rounder sound and is easier to play on, maple is slicker but can be sticky, has a snappier, clearer sound, and if you find the right finish for your taste, IMO can be as easy as rosewood.
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#6
Quote by necrosis1193
Stronger; probably maple since most maple necks are one-piecce and, in my experience, it's a harder wood. Nice is your call. Personally I love both and if I had the money I'd already have a rosewood-fretboard strat too. Rosewood's softer with a darker and rounder sound and is easier to play on, maple is slicker but can be sticky, has a snappier, clearer sound, and if you find the right finish for your taste, IMO can be as easy as rosewood.


I always thought maple was easier!
#7
Well I play SRV and classic rock and currently have an SX strat with a maple neck. Should I switch to rosewood?
"Notes are expensive, so spend them wisely." BB King
#8
Maple has to have some kind of finish to protect it from moisture, rosewood can be left untreated. But like blue_strat said, the load is on the truss rod.
Quote by IbanezGRX40man
Well I play SRV and classic rock and currently have an SX strat with a maple neck. Should I switch to rosewood?

The neck itself will be maple unless you order a custom solid rosewood neck. Your thinking of the fretboard, which doesnt make much fo a difference in the sound fo the guitar.
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Last edited by Metalfan41 at Aug 30, 2009,
#9
Quote by Guitarfailwin
I always thought maple was easier!


Well, I suppose to each his own, but my first strat was a copy with rosewood, so I guess learning on that I wasn't expecting my maple fretboard strat's feel.

Quote by Metalfan41
The neck itself will be maple unless you order a custom solid rosewood neck. Your thinking of the fretboard, which doesnt make much fo a difference in the sound fo the guitar.


No. It doens't make a huge difference, but it's there;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcWqheA-gZg&feature=related
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#10
I always thought rosewood was a stronger wood than maple.... I could be wrong, though. But strength doesn't matter.
#11
Quote by mamosa
I always thought rosewood was a stronger wood than maple.... I could be wrong, though. But strength doesn't matter.

Its denser but might not have as much tensile strenght, I though it was a stronger wood too.
Quote by necrosis1193
Well, I suppose to each his own, but my first strat was a copy with rosewood, so I guess learning on that I wasn't expecting my maple fretboard strat's feel.


No. It doens't make a huge difference, but it's there;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UcWqheA-gZg&feature=related

Its deffinatly warmer, and as similar as they are the individual woods themselves in each guitar are, they play a big roll in the tone too; but I have a feeling if you just replace the neck it will change the tone somewhat.

To the TS, an if you haev an SX, I would consider just buying a new guitar rather than getting a neck that costs as much as the guitar itself.
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Quote by reeses
heed this man's suggestion, for he is wise.

Aww shucks...

Quote by Tom 1.0
Oh and wait for the Schecter fan boys, if you listen real hard you can already hear them coming.
#12
the difference in being "easier" to play on really has to do with the finish. maple requires a finish, like a strat neck with a heavy clear coat on it. rosewood does not. i LOVE exotic wood necks because of the fact that i can play it without a finish on it. i'd take a rosewood neck over a maple one any day. if your hands sweat then you'll probably like the unfinished neck like i do. a clear coated neck can get sticky and gross or just plain slippery if your hands sweat too much.

not fun

EDIT: and go with a whole new guitar not what you're looking for, but a rosewood strat neck can cost $250 and up (250 being a pretty low number to start at). unless everything about your guitar is perfect except the neck i'd save for a new guitar.

EDIT EDIT: i wasn't talking about fretboards. i meant a whole rosewood neck i realized this discussion turned into a fretboard discussion, not a neck. sorry!
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Last edited by LifeIsABullet16 at Aug 31, 2009,
#13
A rosewood neck would be MUCH stiffer than a maple neck...much more mechanical sustain ( all other things being equal ) than a maple neck, and most likely a bit darker in tone. And I'm speaking of whole neck construction, not fretboards.

Rosewood is a heck of a lot harder than maple, and heavier. Which is "nicer/better"? Personal preference, as it's very subjective. Depends on what you're after really.
#14
When the 70 or so Pack Leader guitars were made, about 50 were Walnut thru-neck and the rest Rosewood thru-neck. All used Ebony fretboards which would brighten the sound just a bit as both woods are less dark than Mahogany. Getting the sound balance right is more important than 'better' or 'stronger' woods. In my experience, a Mahogany only body is improved by the brightness of a maple neck but a maple capped body, like a Les Paul is best with the darker Mahogany neck. Alder and Ash bodies seem to be best with Maple necks but a Maple fretboard as well would reduce the fullness a lot and give a naturally twangy sound.
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#15
Quote by Pac_man0123
I think Fender makes a Tele with a rosewood body, but i may be wrong. It's a very dark wood, comparable to mahogany if i'm not mistaken.

Warmoth makes laminate tops, bodies, necks, and fretboards out of rosewood so it should be fine.


He did say he doesn't RECOMMEND that you build the main parts with rosewood, not that it can't be done.
Just because a main guitar company does something, doesn't mean it's good.
However, there's nothing stopping people from doing it, and if it works for them, why not.

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#16
To those talking about Maple necks being harder to play on, my Fender Lite Ash Strat has a very smooth finish [ie, not sticky, and not shiny at all]. It's a satin finish, as opposed to gloss finishes which can be a bit sticky [ie. my Telecaster Deluxe].

Therefore, when it comes to [modern] maple, it's all about the finish applied!
A satin urethane finish feels nice and is nearly bullet proof [or so they say, but tell that that to a small chip near one of my fretwire!].
A gloss urethane finish is the typical finish associated with maple.
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Last edited by Simsimius at Sep 1, 2009,