#1
somebody please tell me all the modes of the harmonic minor scale i cant seem to find them anywhere although i do believe one of them is phrygian dominant
#2
look up on google the modes of harmonic minor. You should find something. oh and include guitar in the search too hahaha.
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#3
Harmonic Minor (Aeolian #7)
Locrian Natural 6
Ionian #5
Dorian #4
Spanish Phrygian/Phrygian Dominant/Phrygian #3
Lydian #2
Super Locrian b7
#4
They work the same way as the modes of the natural minor, not the same notes of course.

Phrygian dominant is the most widely used.
#6
Quote by Habs
Whats the difference between phrygian and phrygian dominant?



Phrygian dominant has a major 3rd instead of a minor 3rd.

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#9
deaththrashcore is correct, but for the record here are some alternate names I've encountered: Ionian #5 also known as Augmented major, Harmonic major, Dorian #4 is also known as the Romanian scale, super locrain b7 is also known as diminished/altered/altered dominant.
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#10
Quote by Wiegenlied
deaththrashcore is correct, but for the record here are some alternate names I've encountered: Ionian #5 also known as Augmented major, Harmonic major, Dorian #4 is also known as the Romanian scale, super locrain b7 is also known as diminished/altered/altered dominant.



True this, but I am for the modes + altered notes names (Dorian #4 etc.).

Imo it's better, cause it tells you exactly which notes are in it as opposed to "romanian scale".

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#12
Quote by Declan87
I thought Harmonic Major was R 2 3 4 5 b6 7

No, it's R 2 3 4 5 6 #7
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Nope. Scales are always compared to the major scale. Declan87 is correct.

Ahhhh, read that wrong. Thought it said harmonic minor.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I read it wrong as well...my bad. Still, though, harmonic minor does not include a #7, as #7=8=1. Harmonic minor is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7.

Wouldn't a harmonic minor be in the context of a minor key? While writing out a G harmonic minor scale you don't use a 1 sharp key signature and then flatten the B and E, you use a 2 flat key signature and sharpen the F.
#20
Natural 7th is just 7. #7 is the raised 7th. When I wrote "R 2 3 4 5 6 #7" I was referring to the harmonic minor in reference to the natural minor.
#21
That's not how it works. Your scale, with C as the root, is C D E F G A B#.

The seventh in the natural minor scale is a minor seventh, denoted by b7. In harmonic minor, it is a major seventh, a natural seventh: 7.
#22
Pwrmax, whilst you were right that when writing a key signature, you consider the harmonic minor as an alteration of a natural minor key, when using this sort of comparison R 2 3 4 5 6 7 always means the major scale and everything is compared with that. I think the continuing confusion has arisen by not realising the distinction between the two.
#23
I was referring to minor with a raised 7th, not major with a raised 7th.
#24
That's not what your notation says. If you want to write out the minor with a raised 7th - it's called a natural seventh, and that scale is called harmonic minor - it is 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7.
#25
According to my theory textbook, and every single music teacher I've had, a harmonic minor scale is a natural minor scale with a raised 7th. Never once have I heard it referred to as a major scale with a lowered 3rd and 6th. Yes, they're the same notes but looking at the picture here, which one would you say best describes a C harmonic minor scale? The 1st one being C minor with a raised 7th, and the 2nd being C major with a lowered 3rd and 6th.
Attachments:
scales.jpg
#26
What you just said does not contradict what I said.

Those first two measures represent the correct (or at least normal) way of writing C harmonic minor. You are correct about that. However, you don't write intervals that way. Intervals of a scale are ALWAYS compared to its parallel major scale. Dorian isn't written 1 2 3 4 5 #6 7; phrygian isn't written 1 b2 3 4 5 6 7; and harmonic minor isn't written 1 2 3 4 5 6 #7. The correct intervals are 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7, 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7, and 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7.
#27
Pwrmax, R 2 b3 4 5 b6 7 is the harmonic minor scale. That sort of comparison always takes R 2 3 4 5 6 7 to be the major scale, otherwise it'd be extremely confusing and not as descriptive.

The example is not relevant to what bangoodcharlote is saying. It's not about key signatures (which you have correct, and I'm sure bangoodcharlote said so earlier in the thread).
#28
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Dorian isn't written 1 2 3 4 5 #6 7; phrygian isn't written 1 b2 3 4 5 6 7; and harmonic minor isn't written 1 2 3 4 5 6 #7.

That's how it is in my book, phrygian and dorian are in context to their parallel minor. That's also how the prof taught it and unless you have a PhD in theory and composition, I'm going to have to go with his way.
#30
Damn ... I was looking at the wrong page in the book. You guys are right, my bad. The page I was looking at shows how to make a dorian or phrygian into its parallel minor, that confused me a bit.