#1
I've watched a video in which is explained how to play the A major shape bar chord.. He says that I should mute the low E string and the high E string.. The result seems to be some sort of power chord with an extra note added on the fifth string. What would the bar be for, then? Is a bar really needed for the A major shape bar chord?
#2
A major


E-0 - P5
B-2 -M3
G-2 -T
D-2 -P5
A-0 -T
E-x

If you knew the theory that would explain evrything but still

Major chord - 1 3 5 Or T(onic) Major third (M3) Perfect Fifth (P5)

or If you mute the high E you would get an A major chord but if you let ring the low E you would get an A major chord in second inversion
George Bernard Shaw


Hell is full of musical amateurs.
#3
for A major itself, you dont need to bar since its an open chord, however, you can move the shape around and that is when you need to bar.

you could play an A major chord like

e-5
B-5
G-6
D-7
A-7
E-5


If you mute the high E for the shape you mention then youre not really barring, but for me that bar shape has been the hardest.

B major

e-2
B-4
G-4
D-4
A-2
E-x

youd bar the A and e strings with your index in this case

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
Last edited by glenthemann at Aug 31, 2009,
#4
Quote by Aneoclassicguy
A major


E-0 - P5
B-2 -M3
G-2 -T
D-2 -P5
A-0 -T
E-x

If you knew the theory that would explain evrything but still

Major chord - 1 3 5 Or T(onic) Major third (M3) Perfect Fifth (P5)

or If you mute the high E you would get an A major chord but if you let ring the low E you would get an A major chord in second inversion
Move that up a fret to B Major, your barre is giving you the 3rd and the 5th, plus an extra tonic (on the G string) - so yes you need the barre. You mute the low E with the tip of your index, and the high e with your barring finger (as its almost impossible to sound the 5th cleanly on the top e - its easier to just mute it)
#5
That isn't what I meant. What I meant is, the A major shape bar chord has the 6th and the 1st string muted - thus leaving only four strings to fret, and thus do I really need to bar that chord?

For example:
E
B 7
G 7
D 7
A 5
E

I need to only fret 5 on the A string, and the A major shape on the next strings. When I play it, I get a good sound, but I did not bar my finger, i just fretted the 5 with my index finger, and used my other fingers to fret the A major shape. What is the bar needed for, then?
#7
Quote by KoenDercksen
That's used if you don't mute the low and high E, since it isn't needed. One could mute the low E to prevent a E in the bass, but the high E is part of the A major chord, which consists out of A-C#-E.

... What? I mute the low E and the high E when playing that chord (I checked if all the notes were there, and yes they were, because the A major shape contains A-C#-E, you don't need to add the high E), but the point is i'm not barring but fretting the notes. I use my index finger to fret the root note, and my middle, ring, and pinky finger to fret the A major shape. Why would i need to put a bar, when fretting the root note is enough? Is it a bad habit not to bar that chord?
#8
Quote by robinlint
... What? I mute the low E and the high E when playing that chord (I checked if all the notes were there, and yes they were, because the A major shape contains A-C#-E, you don't need to add the high E), but the point is i'm not barring but fretting the notes. I use my index finger to fret the root note, and my middle, ring, and pinky finger to fret the A major shape. Why would i need to put a bar, when fretting the root note is enough? Is it a bad habit not to bar that chord?

You dont NEED to fret the high e, but that gives you a fuller sound. Yes all the notes are there, but if you add in the same note from another octave it gives you a fuller sound.

Currently the way youre playing it, youre not 'barring' per say, its called a bar chord because you bar the 1st and 5th strings with your index finger

Are you telling me theyre out of dragons?
They never had dragons..
Who didnt?
The world..
GET THIS GUY OUT OF HERE, FIND ME A DRAGON
#9
Barring makes it a lot easier to switch to other chords. It's not much of a stretch going from fretting those 4 notes to somewhat barring them so you mute the E strings.
Also, as said before, the high E is a part of the A major chord, but it can still function without it. The low E doesn't really fit well since it's lower than the Tonic, making the chord an inversion
#10
Quote by robinlint
... What? I mute the low E and the high E when playing that chord (I checked if all the notes were there, and yes they were, because the A major shape contains A-C#-E, you don't need to add the high E), but the point is i'm not barring but fretting the notes. I use my index finger to fret the root note, and my middle, ring, and pinky finger to fret the A major shape. Why would i need to put a bar, when fretting the root note is enough? Is it a bad habit not to bar that chord?



A lot of people would play an open A major chord with the high E included, it generally sounds better. A lot of people would also barre that shape when they move it up the board so that they can include the fifth on the high E string.

If you're leaving out that note, you obviously don't need to barre with your index finger in order to physically play the chord. However, it's nice to be comfortable with the barre because variations of that chord will make it necessary - like playing a 7th chord.
#11
Quote by robinlint
That isn't what I meant. What I meant is, the A major shape bar chord has the 6th and the 1st string muted - thus leaving only four strings to fret, and thus do I really need to bar that chord?

For example:
E
B 7
G 7
D 7
A 5
E

I need to only fret 5 on the A string, and the A major shape on the next strings. When I play it, I get a good sound, but I did not bar my finger, i just fretted the 5 with my index finger, and used my other fingers to fret the A major shape. What is the bar needed for, then?
You could fret each individual note, but if you are switching between diffferent barre chords - for example and A shaped C Maj to an E shaped G Maj - its easier to barre it. Barring it means you don't have to squeeze all your fingers into a pretty small space too - it might be ok on lower frets, but as the frets get closer together its going to get pretty crowded if you fret each note individually. So really it depends on the circumstances - sometimes it will be better to fret each note individually, other times it will be more practical to barre it. So learn to do both
#12
Quote by zhilla
You could fret each individual note, but if you are switching between diffferent barre chords - for example and A shaped C Maj to an E shaped G Maj - its easier to barre it. Barring it means you don't have to squeeze all your fingers into a pretty small space too - it might be ok on lower frets, but as the frets get closer together its going to get pretty crowded if you fret each note individually. So really it depends on the circumstances - sometimes it will be better to fret each note individually, other times it will be more practical to barre it. So learn to do both

Thanks, this is what I needed .