#1
So
I want to learn to use chromatic licks in a melodic shred/metal context.
An Example: the LAST lick in the Tornado of Souls solo, kinda chromatic. Is there any theoretical grounding to this?
There is one aritcle on this in John Petrucci's Wild Stringdom, but it isn't very clearly explained.
I've treid experimenting, and have come up with some nice sounding licks, but that's kinda by trial and error.
Chromatic scales have no tonal centre, so theoretically they can fit anywhere, but I cannot figure out how.

Now Let's say we have a IV V VI progression-damn common. Now I want to play a chromatic lick over it. Which notes in the scale must occur at the same time as the chord changes, so as to accent the chord change, and make it sound smooth and connected, a musical passage and NOT an exercise shoved into a song? In other words, HOW CAN IT BE MADE TO FIT into the chord progression?

Thanks,

Srinivas
#2
All you have to do is accent the notes that fit and use the ones that don't as passing notes. The notes that fit are any in the same key as the chord progression. The point of a chromatic run is to make it sound somewhat dissonant, so they are always going to sound a bit off no matter what you do for the most part.

You could also use the chromatic sections in the blues scale and the chromatic part that would result from using both the natural and sharp 7 in a minor scale.
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Last edited by Lt.DustyBanana at Aug 31, 2009,
#3
Well, IMO there's no rule to use cromatic licks, at least i don't know.

You just have to finish your lick on the right note of the scale.
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#4
Quote by Lt.DustyBanana
All you have to do is accent the notes that fit and use the ones that don't as passing notes. The notes that fit are any in the same key as the chord progression. The point of a chromatic run is to make it sound somewhat dissonant, so they are always going to sound a bit off no matter what you do for the most part.

You could also use the chromatic sections in the blues scale and the chromatic part that would result from using both the natural and sharp 7 in a minor scale.


Yes I do understand that it's gonna sound a bit dissonant, but, take the example of Tornado of souls solo again. The last lick in there,which are the passing tones and which are the ones in key? There's no distinction as such there, its one long, flowing run that fits perfectly. Another example is in the song "Carpe Diem" by Andy Timmons at around 1:54. Please explain to me HOW this type of fit can be made.
#5
um, read the petrucci column again, don't just look at the pictures... it was pretty well explained when i read it. There's sometimes no reasoning behind it other than... ooooh, fast notes, leading into each other, need to get from here to here... ah!! Chromatics it is!!

Thats it...
#6
DustBanana pretty much hit it on the head. that is only one approach though, you could choose to accent non chord tones to make it even more dissonant.
you can use this approach to make some pretty funky/jazzy blues licks as well.
edit: you could look into twelve tone licks, which were put to good face melting use in Cacophony. I've never dabbled in them, but you want to play each note of the chromatic scale once without repeating any notes. you could still use this approach and probably hit some kind of chord tone on strong beats, or dissonant tones to make it even more freaky

sorry, i'll try answer your question : The last lick in there,which are the passing tones and which are the ones in key?
break it down and look at the rhythm of the notes. if it's triplets for example, every third note is going to be accented naturally as a strong beat. then look at all those notes as a group and see how they relate to the chord underneath. If there's an F# chord underneath, and say on the accents he hits F#, Bb, C#, E, but there are a bunch of crazy notes in between, it's basically an arpeggio with passing tones. The tone you're approaching on a strong beat will generally determine what kind of passing tone you want. because C# is the fifth of F#, it might sound cool to approach it going B, C, C#. or C, D, C#. look at things like that and make licks concentrating on what note you're accenting, and you'll be able to make them up during improv with practice
Last edited by Ead at Aug 31, 2009,
#7
Friedman has some great examples of chromatics or other 'outside' licks which then resolve nicely to the key. In sweating bullets he plays the first part of the solo over an E5 riff so there is no progression there. Its a lot easier to play outside when there is few chords to consider.

Bear in mind Friedman or most other musicians wouldnt sit and work out every chromatic note, they would compose a section then if there were clashes or it sounded weird they would amend it.
#8
Quote by Ead
DustBanana pretty much hit it on the head. that is only one approach though, you could choose to accent non chord tones to make it even more dissonant.
you can use this approach to make some pretty funky/jazzy blues licks as well.
edit: you could look into twelve tone licks, which were put to good face melting use in Cacophony. I've never dabbled in them, but you want to play each note of the chromatic scale once without repeating any notes. you could still use this approach and probably hit some kind of chord tone on strong beats, or dissonant tones to make it even more freaky

sorry, i'll try answer your question : The last lick in there,which are the passing tones and which are the ones in key?
break it down and look at the rhythm of the notes. if it's triplets for example, every third note is going to be accented naturally as a strong beat. then look at all those notes as a group and see how they relate to the chord underneath. If there's an F# chord underneath, and say on the accents he hits F#, Bb, C#, E, but there are a bunch of crazy notes in between, it's basically an arpeggio with passing tones. The tone you're approaching on a strong beat will generally determine what kind of passing tone you want. because C# is the fifth of F#, it might sound cool to approach it going B, C, C#. or C, D, C#. look at things like that and make licks concentrating on what note you're accenting, and you'll be able to make them up during improv with practice


You should look into learning some more theory before posting.

F# arpeggios do not have Bb in them. An F# chord is F#, A#, C#.

The twelve tone technique is used to create atonal music. It lacks a tonal center. Playing twelve tone melodies over a chord progression would make it tonal, and five of the the notes would be accidentals.
#9
Quote by isaac_bandits
You should look into learning some more theory before posting.

F# arpeggios do not have Bb in them. An F# chord is F#, A#, C#.

The twelve tone technique is used to create atonal music. It lacks a tonal center. Playing twelve tone melodies over a chord progression would make it tonal, and five of the the notes would be accidentals.

He still answered the question though, which you may not have. If he got one note wrong and titled it the enharmonic equivalent, then no harm no foul.

"and five of the the notes would be accidentals" equates to chromaticism within a lick.... be nice
Last edited by evolucian at Sep 1, 2009,
#11
You should look into learning some more theory before posting.
QUOTE]

gee, I'm sorry. You should reply in a manner that acknowledges an attempt to help while politely pointing out details that were overlooked.
I'm perfectly aware of what a tone row is used for, that doesn't mean it can't be used to make a lick. I'm pretty sure I acknowledged that it would still be tonal by mentioning that certain beats will inevitably fall on chord tones or not, depending on what you want to do.