#1
I play guitar but i'm going to take up violin. For people who have played the violin and guitar, i was wondering if you could give me any tips?
#2
Get lessons lol. Even if only for long enough to teach you the basics like how to hold the violin and the bow correctly. And get anyone you live with some earplugs. And warn them you are not actually torturing their pet cat, you're just learning violin
#3
Quote by zhilla
Get lessons lol. Even if only for long enough to teach you the basics like how to hold the violin and the bow correctly. And get anyone you live with some earplugs. And warn them you are not actually torturing their pet cat, you're just learning violin


This. You're going to sound like **** for a while. It's much harder to get a good sound out of a violin than a guitar.
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#4
Quote by zhilla
And get anyone you live with some earplugs. And warn them you are not actually torturing their pet cat, you're just learning violin
This. And you're gonna need to have loads of patience
#6
I've played violin since I was 6. That'd be....29 years

Edit: Its a great instrument, and very rewarding once you get vaguely competent, but beginners always sound like they are torturing a bag of cats. I don't think there's any way round it - everyone goes through that stage. You can minimise it by sticking to pizzicato til you've got your intonation sorted, but it'll still be painful for a while when you start bowing
Last edited by zhilla at Aug 31, 2009,
#7
Quote by SaturationPoint
So i'm guessing none of you play the violin? Why do you think you know what you're talking about?


I've been playing about 4 years. I still sound like ****. But I don't play as much as I do guitar or piano.
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#8
Quote by SaturationPoint
So i'm guessing none of you play the violin? Why do you think you know what you're talking about?

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com
Clue is in the name.

You asked for tips, people gave you the most important one: get a teacher.
#9
Quote by Artemis Entreri
This. You're going to sound like **** for a while. It's much harder to get a good sound out of a violin than a guitar.



Not really. My friend is an amazing player, but his old violin was terrible. It was $250 I think with a bow and some rosin. It sounded like **** no matter what he played, and ever since he got his new one anything that previously sounded bad sounded great.


It's a lot harder to PLAY violin than guitar.
Quote by satchgear
I tried it out in store.

Great neck, nice n light, good tuning stability. Overall a good guitar. I didn't but it cause I generally only buy guitars over a grand now.
#10
Quote by V.U.K
Not really. My friend is an amazing player, but his old violin was terrible. It was $250 I think with a bow and some rosin. It sounded like **** no matter what he played, and ever since he got his new one anything that previously sounded bad sounded great.


It's a lot harder to PLAY violin than guitar.
Cheap violins can sound pretty crappy, but beginnner violinists sound evil whatever they play on, and assuming the quality of good old cheapy chinese violins hasn't reduced dramatically in the last few years they are plenty good enough to learn on.
#11
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I've been playing about 4 years. I still sound like ****. But I don't play as much as I do guitar or piano.



Do you take lessons? What kind of stuff can u play?
#12
Quote by SaturationPoint
Do you take lessons? What kind of stuff can u play?

I took about 10 lessons to learn how to actually hold the bow and violin from my teacher. Other than that, I've just been fiddling, no pun intended, around. The Lord of the Rings music, October Sky, that kind of stuff.
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#13
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I took about 10 lessons to learn how to actually hold the bow and violin from my teacher. Other than that, I've just been fiddling, no pun intended, around. The Lord of the Rings music, October Sky, that kind of stuff.


Did you lose interest then or did you just want to learn the basics?
#14
Quote by SaturationPoint
Did you lose interest then or did you just want to learn the basics?

I've never lost interest, I just get frustrated. I tend to really focus on piano and guitar whereas violin is just a hobby.
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#15
Quote by Artemis Entreri
I've never lost interest, I just get frustrated. I tend to really focus on piano and guitar whereas violin is just a hobby.



Can u read music? What's the most frustrating thing about the violin?
#16
Quote by SaturationPoint
Can u read music? What's the most frustrating thing about the violin?


I learned to read after music theory, but before I mostly did it by ear. Although I did memorize a few of the notes for "violin music."

The most frustrating part was how hard it was for me to get a good tone. I got to a point where I could competently "play" things from October Sky or Lord of the Rings but they usually had screeches or I would be a little sharp sometimes. Stuff like that. I've been playing guitar that long and I can play some of the pieces I have worked on nearly flawlessly. I do practice guitar much more than violin though.
It was kind of a comparison thing. I was much better at piano and guitar.
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#17
Quote by zhilla
I've played violin since I was 6. That'd be....29 years

Edit: Its a great instrument, and very rewarding once you get vaguely competent, but beginners always sound like they are torturing a bag of cats. I don't think there's any way round it - everyone goes through that stage. You can minimise it by sticking to pizzicato til you've got your intonation sorted, but it'll still be painful for a while when you start bowing

ive played my friends violin a few times and she said i actually sounded pretty good, she was surprised.
#18
What's the most frustrating thing about the violin?


I second the remark on tone production. Intonation is a rather simple affair compared to bowing. Just remember to place all fingers down when fretting a note. For example, if you were to play a D on the A string, which would be the third finger (ring finger), make sure you place also the index and middle behind it as well so that you have a 'skeleton' for your intonation. My teacher calls it stacking. Always stack...always! But tone production and articulation is far far more sophisticated manner. It will probably take you a long while to acquire a tone which even you will consider listenable, and that's even without complications like spiccato. Good luck.
Last edited by Erc at Sep 1, 2009,
#19
I was too young to really care how bad I sounded when I was sorting my bowing out, but I remember learning vibrato was a pig. It felt like I spent hours with my scroll pressed against the wall trying to get vibrato down
#20
I play both violin and guitar (and piano too... like Artemis Enteri apparently xD)

Yes the tone thing is really hard in violin =S at least with my ****ty $100 violin T.T
and the intonation is also a bitch, specially higher on the neck.

Remember to move your bow a lot.


BTW: I was playing the other day and got a magical boost, I started sounding better, having better intonation and playing faster! ^^
I started learning Vivaldi's Spring last friday, hard stuff =O
for me at least, I've only played like an year or less
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#21
a decent instructor will tell you in 5 minutes if you will ever be a decent violin player so the best thing would be to visit a school and speak with a violin instructor
#22
^^ thats not true anyone can be a decent violin player if they practice, just like any other instrument...

my advice is get a teacher: violin is very hard to learn without one
#23
Quote by Erc
I second the remark on tone production. Intonation is a rather simple affair compared to bowing. Just remember to place all fingers down when fretting a note. For example, if you were to play a D on the A string, which would be the third finger (ring finger), make sure you place also the index and middle behind it as well so that you have a 'skeleton' for your intonation. My teacher calls it stacking. Always stack...always! But tone production and articulation is far far more sophisticated manner. It will probably take you a long while to acquire a tone which even you will consider listenable, and that's even without complications like spiccato. Good luck.


Always stacking is a bad idea. Particularly for fast passages where you're crossing strings a lot. It complicates extensions, too. Plus, if you want a nice fat vibrato on a note, I find it better to only put down the finger that's stopping the note. And its not a guarantee of playing in tune, either.
I don't think intonation is simple compared to bowing. I've been playing for 10 years, and without sounding like a prick, I'd say I'm pretty damn good. Maybe developing a rough sense of intonation is simple compared to bowing, but I remember I went through a phase a coulpe of years ago of not being able to play anything in tune. Bowing, however, once you've become procifient, gets easier, as long as you remain careful not to develop bad habits.

EDIT: you must, must get a teacher. I'm still having lessons now.
Last edited by National_Anthem at Sep 2, 2009,
#24
Quote by National_Anthem
Always stacking is a bad idea. Particularly for fast passages where you're crossing strings a lot. It complicates extensions, too. Plus, if you want a nice fat vibrato on a note, I find it better to only put down the finger that's stopping the note. And its not a guarantee of playing in tune, either.
I don't think intonation is simple compared to bowing. I've been playing for 10 years, and without sounding like a prick, I'd say I'm pretty damn good. Maybe developing a rough sense of intonation is simple compared to bowing, but I remember I went through a phase a coulpe of years ago of not being able to play anything in tune. Bowing, however, once you've become procifient, gets easier, as long as you remain careful not to develop bad habits.

EDIT: you must, must get a teacher. I'm still having lessons now.
What he said (although I wouldn't say I'm any good lol - I used to be decent though)! Even if you think you've got your intonation sorted in 1st position, as soon as you start changing positions it becomes a whole new ball game.
#25
Quote by SaturationPoint
So i'm guessing none of you play the violin? Why do you think you know what you're talking about?



YOU were the one who came here for help.

The restrain I'm demonstrating to stop myself insulting you left right and centre is astounding myself...

I will remind you that you are on a guitar website.
Get lessons, that is all.

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#26

Always stacking is a bad idea.


My Julliard trained teacher disagrees. Simple as that. She's the concertmaster of the SC philharmonic and the principal violinist of the Greenville philharmonic. Forgive me for suggesting that she might know a little more than you about playing the violin.

She's really quite good, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-msGOzY53_w

Maybe 'always' is poor word choice, but having your fingers contorted into only god knows what sort of hand position over the fingerboard at anytime is a bad idea. 'Always' is exactly the word a beginner needs to hear because always stacking is entirely about building a good foundation. I don't consider myself to be a particularly great player, but that's what she tells me, so I take it on good faith given that she's super-virtuosic.
#27
Carl Flesch disagrees. And I trust I don't have to tell you who he is.
By not keeping all of your fingers pressed down on the string behind the note you are stopping, you shouldn't have to contort your hand at all.
#28
Touche, but I'll continue to respectfully disagree, especially regarding the context here. I just think that telling an absolute beginner not to stack is pedagogically unsound considering it's the easiest and most natural way of acquiring a consistency of intonation and hand formation.
#29
Quote by Erc
Touche, but I'll continue to respectfully disagree, especially regarding the context here. I just think that telling an absolute beginner not to stack is pedagogically unsound considering it's the easiest and most natural way of acquiring a consistency of intonation and hand formation.


Ok, I think maybe we can agree on that.
But as soon as you start playing fast, it becomes infeasible and inefficient.
And as soon as you come across something like this, its actually impossible. But this is all for the sake of argument, I think I may be getting a little ahead of myself

And I think I may have misunderstood your argument, actually. Do you mean that the fingers behind the note that you are stopping must remained pressed on the string, or that your hand must always retain the shape as if the fingers were pressed? If it's the latter, then of course this is true 99% of the time, and all the time as far as beginners/intermediates are concerned.