#1
Hey Guys

So ive been reading this article on UG about music theory for beginners:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/learning_music_theory_the_beginning.html

A real good read and i understood most it after one read. Ill reread it to reiterate the authors points. However im struggling with the Circle of Fifths. So i know the positions of the notes within the Circle and that they are separated by perfect fifths hence the name. I also fully understand applying the sharps to the right and flats to the left. So i understand why C has no flats and G major has 1 flat and D has 2 flats etc. What im having trouble to grasp conceptually is the way a major scale is constructed simply by look at the Co5.

For Eg. i know C major is C D E F G A B C but i know that more from looking on guitar pro scales and memorizing it rather than working it out on teh Co5.

So for G major i know that it has one flat, and that being F# based on this formula (F#, C#, G#, D#, A#, E#, B#). So i know that within the G major there is a F#. My question is, using the Co5, how do i find the rest of the notes in G major for eg?
#3
Quote by satriani11
So i understand why C has no flats and G major has 1 flat and D has 2 flats etc. What im having trouble to grasp conceptually is the way a major scale is constructed simply by look at the Co5.


all of those are sharps, not flats...
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#4
beyond me, but there is a pretty smooth article on the circle of fifths itself...search "lesson" and type "circle of fifths" and it will be on there...its a short list that pops up and its rated a 9.0 or better...i know that...it was pretty well organized i just need a little more before i fully understand that stuff lol
#5
Quote by satriani11
So for G major i know that it has one flat, and that being F# based on this formula (F#, C#, G#, D#, A#, E#, B#). So i know that within the G major there is a F#. My question is, using the Co5, how do i find the rest of the notes in G major for eg?

That's a sharp not flat.

You know that the F is sharp, so the rest of the notes are natural. So start on G you go G A B C D E F G, then apply sharps where needed and you have G A B C D E F# G. That's how you know what notes are in the scale, you go in order until you get back to where you started applying accidentals to the notes that need it.
#6
I don't really understand your question...if G major has only one sharp, that being F#, then the rest are just natural notes, not sharps or flats. G A B C D E F# G
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#7
Yer sorry mate i ment sharp rather than flat, was confusing myself. Ok so thats make a bit more sense. So if i wanted to know D major based on the Co5 i would start on the D and i would know that it has 2 sharps within the scale, those being F# and C#. So based on going round the 'clock' D major would be D E F# G A B C# D?

Also i know that F Major has both A and A#,why does this both A's (apart from being half step and needing that to create the major scale)? Like with the D major scale i basicilly said no to an F being there because i had the F#, why does this not apply with the F Major scale andteh A and A#? Hopefully that made sense
#8
Quote by satriani11
Yer sorry mate i ment sharp rather than flat, was confusing myself. Ok so thats make a bit more sense. So if i wanted to know D major based on the Co5 i would start on the D and i would know that it has 2 sharps within the scale, those being F# and C#. So based on going round the 'clock' D major would be D E F# G A B C# D?

Also i know that F Major has both A and A#,why does this both A's (apart from being half step and needing that to create the major scale)? Like with the D major scale i basicilly said no to an F being there because i had the F#, why does this not apply with the F Major scale andteh A and A#? Hopefully that made sense

1) Yes, that's correct

2) Technically, it would be called Bb and not A#, they're the same pitch but it's an issue of nomenclature. You have to go "round the clock" and use every letter once. That's why E# and B# exist.
#9
ahhhhhhhh i see. Thanks alot pwrmax i now understand the Co5s. Thanks for your time